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Decision Making and Assertiveness

Life Skills:

  • Thinking & Reasoning
  • Communication
  • Social & Civic Responsibility
  • Employability

Curriculum Tie:

Time Frame:
2 class periods that run 45 minutes each.

Group Size:
Large Groups


 

Summary:
Students will identify a problem and write a persuasive essay, to the appropriate audience, to correct the problem.

Main Curriculum Tie:
Health Education - 4th Grade
Standard 1 Objective 1

Demonstrate effective decision making based on positive self-worth. *PD

Career Connections:

  • Guidance Counselor
  • Politician
  • Administration
  • Advertising

Materials:

  • Reading text
  • Writing paper

Background For Teachers:

Web Sites

Student Prior Knowledge:
How to write a paragraph: indent, main idea, examples, summary statement, etc.

Intended Learning Outcomes:
Students will identify a problem, an appropriate solution, and the appropriate audience to address their solution to.

Instructional Procedures:
Read a selection from the reading text in Open Court or Houghton Mifflin (refer to the bibliography below.)

Discuss how the characters felt about themselves, their goals, the opposition they faced, and what they did to overcome the opposition. Have students give examples of their responses.

In small groups, have students read examples of persuasive writing from: political pamphlets, advertising, book or film reviews, letters to the editor, or papers collected from previous students.

Discuss how the writers in the examples felt about themselves. How can you tell?

What were the goals of the writers? Make a list of ideas they used to persuade you to accept their goals.

How did the writer organize the piece? How did that help make their point?

How did their use of voice in the various pieces influence you?

Think about something that you would like to change. It could be at school, at home, or in the world. Who would you need to talk to in order to change it? (Audience) Write three paragraphs to your audience to persuade them to help you make this change.


Strategies For Diverse Learners:
Allow English Language Learners to write in their native language with the expectation that if proficient enough, they will then work to translate their piece into English. They can then read or share their piece in both languages.

Not all writing pieces need to go through the entire writing process. However, adept writers who finish quickly, could be encouraged to work together to peer review, revise, and publish.

Students who have a difficult time choosing a topic could be assigned to write an essay from the point of view of the character in the reading text. Again, they need to consider who the audience of that character would be.

Extensions:
Students could email their pieces to another prearranged fourth grade class for peer review, using the rubric.

Finished pieces could be sent to their intended audience.

Finished pieces could be published on the Internet or in a school publication.

Finished pieces could be submitted to the Writing Festival, Reflections Contest, or other writing contests.

Role play persuading someone to your point of view.

Hold a debate.


Assessment Plan:
Students can peer review each otherís writing pieces using the rubric.

Students can peer review each otherís writing by drawing a smile next to phrases or sentences using strong ideas or voice. Students are likely to remember what they did well and use it again.

Rubric:

Bibliography:
Houghton Mifflin:
Cameron, Ann. “Julian Secret Agent.” Imagine, Invitations to Literacy. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1996. p. 265.
Cavan, Seamus. “Thurgood Marshal and Equal Rights.” Imagine, Invitations to Literacy. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1996. p. 265.
p. 427.

Open Court:
Alexander, Lloyd. “The King’s Fountain.” Collections For Young Scholars. Chicago: Open Court Publishing, 1995. Vol. 4(1).
Pearce, Carol Ann. “Amelia Earhart, Fly On.” from Collections For Young Scholars. (1995) Collections For Young Scholars. Chicago: Open Court Publishing, 1995. Vol. 4(1).
Freedman, Florence B. “Two Tickets To Freedom.” Collections For Young Scholars. Chicago: Open Court Publishing, 1995. Vol. 4(1).
Miklowitz, Gloria D. and Yates, Madeleine. “Gregg Nevarez, Young Tycoon.” Collections For Young Scholars. Chicago: Open Court Publishing, 1995. Vol. 4(1).
Paris-Chitanvis, Jacquelin. “Dorothy Brunson: the Making of an Entrepreneur.” Collections For Young Scholars. Chicago: Open Court Publishing, 1995. Vol. 4(1).
Brown, Marion Marsh. “The Story of Susan La Flesche Picotte.” Collections For Young Scholars. Chicago: Open Court Publishing, 1995. Vol. 4(1).
Patterson, Lillie. “Sewed Up His Heart.” Collections For Young Scholars. Chicago: Open Court Publishing, 1995. Vol. 4(1).
Wiley. “Music and Slavery.” Collections For Young Scholars. Chicago: Open Court Publishing, 1995. Vol. 4(2).
Wymer, Norman. “George Stephenson.” Collections For Young Scholars. Chicago: Open Court Publishing, 1995. Vol. 4(2).
Fradin, Dennis B. “Pocahontas.” Collections For Young Scholars. Chicago: Open Court Publishing, 1995. Vol. 4(2).
Sapp, Karen. “Paul Cuffe.” Collections For Young Scholars. Chicago: Open Court Publishing, 1995. Vol. 4(2).
Hughes, Langston. “Freedom.” Collections For Young Scholars. Chicago: Open Court Publishing, 1995. Vol. 4(2).

Open Court Intervention Guide:
Searl, Duncan. “Rosa Parks Makes History.” Intervention Guide, Open Court Reading. Columbus: SRA/McGraw Hill, 2000. p. 46.
Dalin, Joan. “A Peaceful Warrior.” Intervention Guide, Open Court Reading. Columbus: SRA/McGraw Hill, 2000. p.54.
Russo, Frank. “The First Woman Doctor.” Intervention Guide, Open Court Reading. Columbus: SRA/McGraw Hill, 2000. p.162.
Reese, Morgan. “The Hiding Place.” Intervention Guide, Open Court Reading. Columbus: SRA/McGraw Hill, 2000. p.220.
Howell, Rob. “Sequoya’s New Alphabet.” Intervention Guide, Open Court Reading. Columbus: SRA/McGraw Hill, 2000. p. 246.

Author:
MARIANNE AMATANGELO

Created Date :
Jul 13 2002 13:43 PM

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