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Learn New Words

Time Frame:
1 class period that runs 15 minutes.

Group Size:
Large Groups


 

Summary:
This is a sample lesson that can be applied to any book to help students learn new vocabulary words.

Main Curriculum Tie:
English Language Arts Grade 2
Language Standard 4 a.

Use sentence-level context as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.

Materials:

  • Penquin Post, by Debi Gliori
  • Individual Student Word Log

Background For Teachers:
This lesson can be adapted to any story. Here is a basic sequence of the lesson:

  1. Read the story.
  2. Help the students understand the meaning of 3 or 4 unfamiliar words in the story context.

    Repeat steps 3-7 for each word:

  3. Have the student repeat the word.
  4. Explain the word in student-friendly language.
  5. Present the word in contexts that are different than the story context.
  6. Have the students say the word again.
  7. Have them write the word in their word log and write or draw a definition so that they will remember the word.

Intended Learning Outcomes:

  1. Develop vocabulary
  2. Share ideas using communication skills
  3. Listen attentively and respond to communication

Instructional Procedures:
This lesson can be used with any book, but we have chosen Penguin Post, by Debi Gliori.

  1. Read the book to your students.

  2. After the reading, go back into the book to emphasize three words. We choose expedition, parcel, and peculiar as examples for this lesson.

  3. The teacher would say, "In the story the mother was going out on a food finding expedition. That means that the mother was going on a long trip to find food. Let's think about what expedition means. If I said that our class was going on a expedition to Africa to take pictures - what does that mean? If I said the explorer went on an expedition to Antarctica to study penguins - what would that mean?

    Now see if you can say a sentence to answer my questions about expedition. What would you take on an expedition to the South Pole? (Have the students start their sentence with "If I went on an expedition to the South Pole, I would need to take... so that I could..."

    What would I be doing on an expedition to the moon? (Have the students start their sentence with "If I went on an expedition to the moon I would..."

    Ask then, what is our word?

  4. Now have the students write their word in their word log and have them write or draw a definition for expedition.

  5. The teacher would say, "In the story Milo watched as Mrs. Major opened her parcel. That means that Mrs. Major opening a package or bundle. Let's think about what parcel means. If I said that our class received a parcel in the mail - what does that mean?

    If I said that the young boy received a parcel from his grandmother for his birthday - what would that mean?

    Now see if you can say a sentence to answer my questions about the word parcel. What could you send in a parcel? (Have the students start their sentence with "In a parcel, I could send...")

    If our class received a parcel, what could we be receiving? (Have the students start their sentence with "In the class parcel, we could receive..." Ask then, what is our word?

  6. Now have the students write their word in their word log and have them write or draw a definition for parcel.

  7. The teacher would say, "In the story Milo delivered a peculiar shaped parcel. That means that Milo had a package that was a different shape or not a normal shape (like square or rectangular).

    Let's think about what peculiar means. If I said that the dog was acting peculiar - what does that mean?

    If I said that there was a peculiar smell coming from the lunch room - what would that mean? Now see if you can say a sentence to answer my questions about the word peculiar.

    How would a fish act if it was acting peculiar? (Have the students start their sentence with "A fish that was acting peculiar would be...")

    If your dad built a tree house and it looked peculiar, what would it look like? (Have the students start their sentence with "The peculiar looking tree house was..."

    Ask then, what is our word?

  8. Now have the students write their word in their word log and have them write or draw a definition for peculiar.


Strategies For Diverse Learners:
This same activity can be done in a small group setting - guided reading.

Extensions:
You can extend this lesson, by asking the students further questions. For example:

  • How is an expedition different than a vacation?
  • Which is more likely to come in a parcel: a goldfish, a toy train, or a refrigerator?
  • Which is more peculiar, a horse walking down main street or an elephant walking down main street?

Assessment Plan:
Teacher will assess the student knowledge of the words by the student oral responses to the questions and their written definitions of the words.

Bibliography:
Penquin Post, by Debi Gliori ISBN 0-15-216765-X

Lesson adapted from Bringing Words to Life, by Isabel L. Beck, Margaret G. McKeown, and Linda Kucan.
(An excellent teacher resource for teaching vocabulary.)

Author:
Karen Lowry
Karma Bonner
Grace Wayman

Created Date :
Aug 02 2005 09:43 AM

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