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Language Arts - Elementary Curriculum
Language Arts - 3rd Grade
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Lesson Plans  
 
Standard 8
(Writing): Students write daily to communicate effectively for a variety of purposes and audiences.
 
USOE-Approved Lesson Plans   USOE-Approved Lesson Plans
 
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  • Can You Convince Me?: Persuasive Writing
    In this ReadWriteThink lesson, students are introduced to the basic concepts of lobbying for something that is important to them and making persuasive arguments. Through a classroom game and resource handouts, students become aware of the techniques used in persuasive oral arguments and apply them to independent persuasive writing activities.
  • Can You Haiku?
    Haiku show us the world in a water drop, providing a tiny lens through which to glimpse the miracle and mystery of life. Combining close observation with a moment of reflection, this simple yet highly sophisticated form of poetry can help sharpen students' response to language and enhance their powers of self-expression. In this lesson, students learn the rules and conventions of haiku, study examples by Japanese masters, and create haiku of their own.
  • Dr. King's Dream
    In this lesson, students will learn about the life and work of civil rights leader Martin Luther King, Jr. Students will listen to a brief biography, view photographs of the March on Washington, hear a portion of King's 'I Have a Dream' speech, and discuss what King's words mean to them. Finally, they will create picture books about their own dreams of freedom for Americans today.
  • Fairy Tales, Then and Now
    In this lesson, students read an old fairy tale or story and list the geographical features and characters described in the story. They'll then think about how the story might be updated to reflect their own modern setting and culture and will conclude by performing an updated version of the story. This lesson is found on the Xpeditions website from National Geographic.
  • Fleas!
    One parasite most students will have heard of and many will have seen is the common cat flea. That's the one that pesters our cats and dogs in the United States (the dog flea harasses European pets). In this lesson, students will learn about the flea's life cycle and the reasons fleas are so attracted to our pets. They'll conclude by writing a story from the flea's perspective.
  • I'm Gonna Sit Right Down & Write Someone a Letter
    Use these fascinating letters as a starting point for discussion of and practice in the conventions and purposes of letter writing. After completing the lessons in this unit your students will be able to answer the following questions: What are the conventions of letter-writing? How is letter-writing used for various types of communication?
  • Lewis and Clark: Prized Possessions
    In this lesson, students explore this Native American craft and design and create their own belts.
  • Numbers and Language
    In the following lesson, students participate in activities in which they focus on the role of numbers and language in real-world situations. Students are asked to discuss, describe, read and write about numbers they find in familiar real-world situations. The emphasis on using components of language helps students build a broader vocabulary of numbers than the traditional symbolic representation of numbers. The activities also help develop good number sense. These lessons include an individual activity for four different levels plus one for parents to complete with their child at home. The grade levels for the four activities are: K-2, 3-4, 5-6, and 7-8.
  • Peace Poems and Picasso Doves
    This lesson, from ReadWriteThink, supports third-grade students as they apply think-aloud strategies to reading, as well as to the composition of artwork and poetry. Activities include collaborative as well as individual work. Technology tools are integrated as students research symbols of peace and as they prewrite, compose, and publish their poetry.
  • Playing with Prepositions Through Poetry
    In this lesson from ReadWriteThink, students have the opportunity to play with language, particularly prepositions, through the literature of Ruth Heller. Taking those experiences as a reader, they are asked to continue to play with the language in poetry.
  • Shape Poems: Writing Extraordinary Poems About Ordinary Objects
    Students will recognize the characteristics and format of a shape poem; compile a list of content area terms and sensory images (collaboratively as a class and also independently) that relate to a shape or object, as part of the process of brainstorming a word bank for their shape poem; apply spelling knowledge and strategies when brainstorming words for the word bank and writing and revising their shape poem.
  • The Story of Jack and the Bank Stalk
    In this lesson, the story of "'Jack and the Bean Stalk" is used as vehicle for the understanding of money. Fairy tales have always been used to give lessons about life. The story of "Jack and the Bean Stalk" is a good lesson about the importance of knowing about money and banks. The story of Jack asks the question, "What is money?"
  • Using Picture Books to Teach Characterization
    This ReadWriteThink lesson invites students to examine the craft of developing characters through focused experiences with pictures books. Through the careful analysis of character portrayal using the text and illustrations as cues, and online tools such as the ReadWriteThink Story Map, students have the opportunity to build bridges from their own experiences as readers to those skills needed as writers.
  • Weather Complaints
    This lesson asks students to consider the weather and climate in their home region and to think about the ways in which people complain about the weather. Students will refer to a climate map to predict what the climate might be like in specified United States cities. They will then find out the average temperatures and precipitation for those cities by using a weather website. As a final project, students will write statements that people in these cities might make to describe their weather and climate.
  • Where Do Your Belongings Come From?
    This lesson asks students to figure out where their belongings came from and to consider the reasons why many items are imported from other countries. They will list the locations of origin for the items they use on a typical morning. They will conclude by researching the export industries of an East Asian country and writing paragraphs describing this country's exports to the United States.
  • Who's Got Mail? Authentic Letter Writing
    This lesson, from ReadWriteThink, uses literature and shared writing to teach letter-writing format and promote authentic letter writing. Students listen to and talk about stories dealing with correspondence, then participate in a collaborative, whole-group letter-writing activity. They go on to write their own letters to deliver or mail to adult school helpers, family, or friends.
  • Writing Poetry Like Pros
    This set of 4 lesson plans from EDSITEment utilizes poetry to serve as the inspiration for some terrific writing. Using poems available through EDSITEment resources, educators can make poetry an exciting teaching and learning tool in the classroom.
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