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Language Arts - Elementary Curriculum
Language Arts - 5th Grade
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Lesson Plans  
 
Standard 7
(Comprehension): Students understand, interpret, and analyze narrative and informational grade level text.
 
USOE-Approved Lesson Plans   USOE-Approved Lesson Plans
  • Magnetic Hangman
    After hanging horseshoe magnets, students will predict what will happen when the north end of their bar magnets are placed near the north end of their hanging magnets.
  • Magnets in a Bag
    Students will compare and contrast the patterns that they create using iron fillings and different types of magnets.
  • Understanding Geological Time
    Students will understand the timeline of the earth’s geological features.
  • Where's Up?
    Students will use a needle and a magnet to create a compass
 
Thinkfinity Lesson Plans   Lesson Plans
  • A Trip to Wonderland
    This unit explores Lewis Carroll's adaptation for younger readers of his beloved classic, 'Alice's Adventures in Wonderland'. After sharing their concepts about Wonderland, students listen to the opening chapters of the story and view Sir John Tenniel's illustrations from the original edition. Using images of 'big' and 'small' from Alice's experiences, students develop these concepts in their own drawings. Students then compare Carroll's fantastic animals with creatures from other children's stories and use computers to craft images of their own fantasy creatures.
  • Aesop and Ananse: Animal Fables and Trickster Tale
    In this lesson from EDSITEment, students will become familiar with fables and trickster tales from different cultural traditions. They will explore how folktales employ animals in different ways to portray human strengths and weaknesses and how this wisdom is passed down from one generation to the next. These lessons introduce students to the world of folklore and explore how folktales convey the perspectives of world cultures.
  • All Together Now: Collaborations in Poetry Writing
    This set of 3 lesson plans from EDSITEment makes poetry exciting for students as they listen to, write, and recite poems that are sure to please. By the end of these lessons, students should be able to create lines of poetry in response to poems read aloud, identify musical elements of literary language, and recite short poems or excerpts.
  • Ancient Flood Stories
    In this lesson, from Xpeditions, students will discuss ancient flood stories, including the story of Noah's Ark. They will also discuss the evidence of a flood that's been found in the Black Sea. Students will then write stories about what it might have been like immediately before and during this flood.
  • Balancing Three Branches at Once
    This page contains 4 EDSITEment lessons in which students use primary source documents to investigate of how the three branches of the American government can check each other.
  • Can You Haiku?
    Haiku show us the world in a water drop, providing a tiny lens through which to glimpse the miracle and mystery of life. Combining close observation with a moment of reflection, this simple yet highly sophisticated form of poetry can help sharpen students' response to language and enhance their powers of self-expression. In this lesson, students learn the rules and conventions of haiku, study examples by Japanese masters, and create haiku of their own.
  • Count on Mathematics for Number Sense
    This journal-based lesson plan helps children to develop number sense through activities involving collection, representation, and analysis of data. In addition, children practice reading and writing large numbers and use estimation to arrive at appropriate answers. There are two different activities, one for grades 3-4 and one for grades 5-6.
  • Developing a Definition of Reading
    This lesson from ReadWriteThink invites students to interact with a variety of different texts as they uncover the meaning of reading. Each student will brainstorm what it means to be a successful reader. Based upon shared findings and discussions, students will create a living definition of reading.
  • Egyptian Symbols and Figures: Hieroglyphs
    This lesson plan from EDSITEment introduces students to the writing, art, and religious beliefs of ancient Egypt through hieroglyphs, one of the oldest writing systems in the world, and through tomb paintings. The lesson plan is in two parts. In this first lesson, the class creates a pictorial alphabet of its own and then learns and uses the symbols of the Egyptian hieroglyphic alphabet. In the second lesson, Egyptian Symbols and Figures: Scroll Painting, students identify and represent in their own drawings figures from the Book of the Dead, a funeral text written on papyrus and carved on the walls of tombs to help guide the deceased through the afterlife.
  • Egyptian Symbols and Figures: Scroll Paintings
    This lesson plan from EDSITEment introduces students to the writing, art, and religious beliefs of ancient Egypt through hieroglyphs, one of the oldest writing systems in the world, and through tomb paintings. The lesson plan is in two parts. In this second lesson, students identify and represent in their own drawings figures from the Book of the Dead, a funeral text written on papyrus and carved on the walls of tombs to help guide the deceased through the afterlife. In the first lesson, Egyptian Symbols and Figures: Hieroglyphs, the class creates a pictorial alphabet of its own and then learns and uses the symbols of the Egyptian hieroglyphic alphabet.
  • Engaging Students in a Collaborative Exploration of the Gettysburg Address
    This lesson plan invites groups of students to learn more about the historical significance of President Abraham Lincoln's famous speech as well as the time period and people involved. Students will work together, participating in inquiry projects based on the speech, using the words and phrases of the speech itself.
  • Escaping Slavery: Sweet Clara & the Freedom Quilt
    This lesson, from ReadWriteThink, uses the picture book "Sweet Clara and the Freedom Quilt" by Deborah Hopkinson and an interactive website to enhance students' understanding of the Underground Railroad and slavery. They will create a problems/solutions/events chart to help them understand the relationships between Clara's problems and how she solves them. Similar to Clara's map that shows the path north to freedom, students create their own map designing a key, a compass, and landmarks surrounding their home and school. Students will develop their reading comprehension skills and application of mapping skills.
  • Exploring Compare and Contrast Structure in Expository Texts
    This lesson from ReadWriteThink focuses on the strategy of compare and contrast. Students use graphic organizers and clue words to evaluate nonfiction text, and they participate in a variety of other activities.
  • Eyewitness to History
    Families connect us to our own history and to the history of the world around us. In this lesson from EDSITEment, students explore this second set of connections, talking with family members about landmark events they have witnessed in their lifetimes to learn how history touches our lives.
  • Fables and Trickster Tales Around the World
    This lesson plan from EDSITEment introduces students to folktales, such as fables and trickster tales, from around the world. Students become familiar with different folklore traditions and genres, as well as the process of the oral transmission of culture and history. This lesson plan comprises a series of activities that include reading, writing, and literary analysis. Also included is an internet research activity, as well as a list of links to related resources.
  • Fairy Tales, Then and Now
    In this lesson, students read an old fairy tale or story and list the geographical features and characters described in the story. They'll then think about how the story might be updated to reflect their own modern setting and culture and will conclude by performing an updated version of the story. This lesson is found on the Xpeditions website from National Geographic.
  • Fleas!
    One parasite most students will have heard of and many will have seen is the common cat flea. That's the one that pesters our cats and dogs in the United States (the dog flea harasses European pets). In this lesson, students will learn about the flea's life cycle and the reasons fleas are so attracted to our pets. They'll conclude by writing a story from the flea's perspective.
  • Helpful Animals and Compassionate Humans in Folklore
    Students will learn to define a folktale, understand the characteristics of helpful animal folktales, explain the roles humans play in helpful animal stories (human in distress, compassionate hunter, seeker/companion), and the conditions for animal transformation.
  • I Have No Money, Would You Take Wampum?
    In this lesson students use folk tales, history, and their own experiences to recognize the inter-relatedness of goods, services, and money. They will locate information about barter as a means of trade and use folk tales as a historical instrument.
  • If You Were a Pioneer on the Oregon Trail
    In this lesson from EDSITEment, students compare imagined travel experiences of their own with the actual experiences of 19th-century pioneers. After creating, as a class, oral stories about contemporary cross-country journeys, students learn about the experiences of the emigrants who traveled on the Oregon Trail. They then create works of historical fiction in the form of picture books, drawing upon the information they have learned.
  • It Came From Greek Mythology
    This page contains 6 EDSITEment lessons based around teaching Greek mythology. Students will study basic plots of three Greek myths and discuss three types of themes in Greek myths. They will also explore contemporary uses of terms from Greek mythology and analyze artistic and literary works based on or inspired by Greek myths.
  • Literature Circles: Getting Started
    This lesson from ReadWriteThink explores Literature Circles, a great way to supplement a reading program in a literature-based classroom. Students create and answer comprehension questions, discover new vocabulary, and examine elements of literature.
  • Modern Culture
    In this lesson from the National Geographic Xpeditions website, students examine their own modern culture and compare it to other cultures around the world. Students draw pictures of themselves and their parents in their daily lives and write paragraphs discussing the items that are important to their culture as compared to the cultures of others.
  • My Piece of History
    In this lesson, from EDSITEment, students examine pictures of household objects from the late 20th century, gather historical information about them from older family members, and then create an in-class exhibit of historical objects from their own homes.
  • Numbers and Language
    In the following lesson, students participate in activities in which they focus on the role of numbers and language in real-world situations. Students are asked to discuss, describe, read and write about numbers they find in familiar real-world situations. The emphasis on using components of language helps students build a broader vocabulary of numbers than the traditional symbolic representation of numbers. The activities also help develop good number sense. These lessons include an individual activity for four different levels plus one for parents to complete with their child at home. The grade levels for the four activities are: K-2, 3-4, 5-6, and 7-8.
  • On the Home Front
    This page contains 4 EDSITEment lessons in which students investigate how non-combatants contributed to the war effort during World War II and are then invited to reflect on how young people can contribute to the solution of contemporary national problems. Students will also investigate how posters were used to encourage home front efforts during World War II.
  • Orangutan U
    This Weekly Science Update, found on the Science NetLinks website, focuses on the ability of primates to communicate with humans. Students learn about the work of animal behaviorist Rob Shumaker, who has discovered that orangutans appear capable of a much broader range of communication than had been previously believed. Using a 90-second net-radio format, Weekly Science Updates are mini-lessons designed to introduce and investigate various scientific concepts.
  • Pennies Make Cents
    In this lesson, students will review the history of trade before money. They will then investigate the history of money. Students will locate information about the first coin authorized by the United States and will learn about the penny.
  • Play with Words: Rhyme & Verse
    Children of all ages enjoy listening to bouncy rhythms and reciting catchy rhymes. In this unit from EDSITEment, students will use their senses to experience poetry. Students will listen to poems and rhymes, clap out syllables, and sing along with familiar tunes. They will also use puppets and crafts to help recall and retell favorite poems. Finally, students will experience the joy of crafting their own original poems.
  • Reviving Bodie
    In this lesson students will research the ghost town of Bodie and imagine that the state of California has decided to make Bodie a town again and to let people settle there. The groups will write guides for the town's new potential citizens explaining the things they need to know about the town's climate, landscape, location, natural resources, and history.
  • Shadows
    This lesson is part of a four-lesson series in which students observe the daytime and nighttime sky regularly to identify sequences of changes and to look for patterns in these changes. At the K-2 level, learning about objects in the sky should be entirely observational and qualitative. The priority is to get students noticing and describing what objects in the sky look like at different times.
  • Sky 3: Modeling Shadows
    This lesson is part of a four-lesson series in which students observe the daytime and nighttime sky regularly to identify sequences of changes and to look for patterns in these changes. At the K-2 level, learning about objects in the sky should be entirely observational and qualitative. The priority is to get students noticing and describing what objects in the sky look like at different times.
  • Stars and Stripes Forever: Flag Facts for Flag Day
    In this unit from EDSITEment, students learn what a symbol is while developing their understanding of how one particular symbol, the American Flag, plays an important role in the everyday lives of American citizens. An additional lesson, geared specifically to grade 2 students, focuses on the words and phrases contained within the Pledge of Allegiance. From this introductory page, teachers can access archival images needed to complete the unit.
  • The Preamble to the Constitution: How Do You Make
    This page contains 5 EDSITEment lessons in which students investigate the purposes of the U.S. Constitution, as identified in the Preamble to the Constitution, and study fundamental values and principles as they are expressed in the Preamble to the U.S. Constitution.
  • The Story of Jack and the Bank Stalk
    In this lesson, the story of "'Jack and the Bean Stalk" is used as vehicle for the understanding of money. Fairy tales have always been used to give lessons about life. The story of "Jack and the Bean Stalk" is a good lesson about the importance of knowing about money and banks. The story of Jack asks the question, "What is money?"
  • Trade and Transporation in the United States
    In this lesson, students will imagine what it would be like to operate a plane, train, or truck along a trade route across the United States. They will also look at maps of major U.S. transportation networks and will explain how specific products might get from one place to another.
  • Traveling Terrain: Comprehending Nonfiction Text
    This lesson, from ReadWriteThink, teaches specific skills to students in order to improve their comprehension of nonfiction text found in website format. Strategies include locating specific information, identifying text features of nonfiction text, and generalizing information read to related topics. The lesson centers on a science-oriented website, but can be adapted to other content area websites.
  • Tricks for Treats
    In this lesson, for grades PreK to 2, students access an interactive online storybook that helps them to explore reasons why their pets perform tricks. Students will discuss that people as well as pets are motivated by positive incentives.
  • Under the Deep Blue Sea
    In this lesson, students have the opportunity to explore oceans and ocean life. Through creative writing and research projects, students will learn about the ocean and the creatures that live there. This resource is located on the Edsitement website.
  • Weather Complaints
    This lesson asks students to consider the weather and climate in their home region and to think about the ways in which people complain about the weather. Students will refer to a climate map to predict what the climate might be like in specified United States cities. They will then find out the average temperatures and precipitation for those cities by using a weather website. As a final project, students will write statements that people in these cities might make to describe their weather and climate.
  • What Makes a Hero?
    In this unit from EDSITEment, students will explore heroes and the traits that make them heroic. Students begin by thinking about their own heroes and list the character traits their heroes possess. Students then explore kid heroes, adults' heroes, local heroes, and heroes from history, before completing one of several suggested culminating activities.
  • Where Do Your Belongings Come From?
    This lesson asks students to figure out where their belongings came from and to consider the reasons why many items are imported from other countries. They will list the locations of origin for the items they use on a typical morning. They will conclude by researching the export industries of an East Asian country and writing paragraphs describing this country's exports to the United States.
  • Wonderful Waves
    In this Science NetLinks lesson, students create a wave model using two different types of simple models. The purpose of this lesson is to demonstrate that simple models can be used to represent real world objects that are not easily brought into a classroom.
  • Writing Poetry Like Pros
    This set of 4 lesson plans from EDSITEment utilizes poetry to serve as the inspiration for some terrific writing. Using poems available through EDSITEment resources, educators can make poetry an exciting teaching and learning tool in the classroom.
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