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Language Arts - Elementary Curriculum
English Language Arts Grade 5
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Lesson Plans  
 
Reading: Literature Standard 2
Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic; summarize the text.
 
  • Character Mapping
    Using popular trade books students will create a character map by first working on their own, and then in small groups. Students will share their work with the whole class.
 
Thinkfinity Lesson Plans   Lesson Plans
  • A Trip to Wonderland
    This unit explores Lewis Carroll's adaptation for younger readers of his beloved classic, 'Alice's Adventures in Wonderland'. After sharing their concepts about Wonderland, students listen to the opening chapters of the story and view Sir John Tenniel's illustrations from the original edition. Using images of 'big' and 'small' from Alice's experiences, students develop these concepts in their own drawings. Students then compare Carroll's fantastic animals with creatures from other children's stories and use computers to craft images of their own fantasy creatures.
  • Bright Morning: Exploring Character Development
    In this lesson from ReadWriteThink, students explore characters in their reading, identifying traits and pointing to textual support. This lesson uses "Sing Down the Moon" by Scott O'Dell; however, any fictional text can be adapted to the lesson.
  • Critical Perspectives: Reading and Writing About Slavery
    In this lesson, students critically examine the perspectives of slaves and slave owners.
  • Earth Verse: Using Science in Poetry
    This lesson is a great way to teach both scientific and English content to a class, although the teacher can easily choose another book and subject area. In this lesson, students listen to poems in the book Science Verse by Jon Scieszka.
  • Escaping Slavery: Sweet Clara & the Freedom Quilt
    This lesson, from ReadWriteThink, uses the picture book "Sweet Clara and the Freedom Quilt" by Deborah Hopkinson and an interactive website to enhance students' understanding of the Underground Railroad and slavery. They will create a problems/solutions/events chart to help them understand the relationships between Clara's problems and how she solves them. Similar to Clara's map that shows the path north to freedom, students create their own map designing a key, a compass, and landmarks surrounding their home and school. Students will develop their reading comprehension skills and application of mapping skills.
  • Fables and Trickster Tales Around the World
    This lesson plan from EDSITEment introduces students to folktales, such as fables and trickster tales, from around the world. Students become familiar with different folklore traditions and genres, as well as the process of the oral transmission of culture and history. This lesson plan comprises a series of activities that include reading, writing, and literary analysis. Also included is an internet research activity, as well as a list of links to related resources.
  • It Came From Greek Mythology
    This page contains 6 EDSITEment lessons based around teaching Greek mythology. Students will study basic plots of three Greek myths and discuss three types of themes in Greek myths. They will also explore contemporary uses of terms from Greek mythology and analyze artistic and literary works based on or inspired by Greek myths.
  • Literature Circles: Getting Started
    This lesson from ReadWriteThink explores Literature Circles, a great way to supplement a reading program in a literature-based classroom. Students create and answer comprehension questions, discover new vocabulary, and examine elements of literature.
  • Peace Poems and Picasso Doves
    This lesson, from ReadWriteThink, supports third-grade students as they apply think-aloud strategies to reading, as well as to the composition of artwork and poetry. Activities include collaborative as well as individual work. Technology tools are integrated as students research symbols of peace and as they prewrite, compose, and publish their poetry.
  • Slave Narratives: Constructing U.S. History Through Analyzing Primary Sources
    In these activities, students research narratives from the Federal Writers' Project and describe the lives of former African slaves in the U.S. - both before and after emancipation.
  • Strategic Reading and Writing: Summarizing Antislavery Biographies
    In this lesson, students practice writing effective summaries using biographies.
  • The Story of Jack and the Bank Stalk
    In this lesson, the story of "'Jack and the Bean Stalk" is used as vehicle for the understanding of money. Fairy tales have always been used to give lessons about life. The story of "Jack and the Bean Stalk" is a good lesson about the importance of knowing about money and banks. The story of Jack asks the question, "What is money?"
  • Using Historical Fiction to Learn About the Civil War
    This lesson uses the book Meet Addy by Connie Porter to teach the characteristics of historical fiction, the making of inferences, the use of visualization, and Civil War history.
  • Using Picture Books to Teach Characterization
    This ReadWriteThink lesson invites students to examine the craft of developing characters through focused experiences with pictures books. Through the careful analysis of character portrayal using the text and illustrations as cues, and online tools such as the ReadWriteThink Story Map, students have the opportunity to build bridges from their own experiences as readers to those skills needed as writers.
  • What Makes Poetry? Exploring Line Breaks
    This lesson, from ReadWriteThink, engages children in exploring various poems and hypothesizing about why lines are broken where they are in poetry. Students then experiment with line breaks and how they affect rhythm, sound, meaning, appearance, and can substitute for punctuation in poetry.
  • Writing Poetry Like Pros
    This set of 4 lesson plans from EDSITEment utilizes poetry to serve as the inspiration for some terrific writing. Using poems available through EDSITEment resources, educators can make poetry an exciting teaching and learning tool in the classroom.
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