Skip Navigation

Utah Core  •  Curriculum Search  •  All Language Arts - Elementary Lesson Plans  •  USOE Language Arts - Elementary Home Page

 

Language Arts - Elementary Curriculum
English Language Arts Grade 5
Back to Previous Screen Back
Lesson Plans  
 
Writing Standard 9
Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
a.
Apply grade 5 Reading standards to literature (e.g., “Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events in a story or a drama, drawing on specific details in the text [e.g., how characters interact]”).
 
Thinkfinity Lesson Plans   Lesson Plans
  • Balancing Three Branches at Once
    This page contains 4 EDSITEment lessons in which students use primary source documents to investigate of how the three branches of the American government can check each other.
  • Can You Haiku?
    Haiku show us the world in a water drop, providing a tiny lens through which to glimpse the miracle and mystery of life. Combining close observation with a moment of reflection, this simple yet highly sophisticated form of poetry can help sharpen students' response to language and enhance their powers of self-expression. In this lesson, students learn the rules and conventions of haiku, study examples by Japanese masters, and create haiku of their own.
  • Comprehension Strategies Using Graphic Organizers
    In this lesson from ReadWriteThink, collaborative strategic reading (CSR) is initially presented to students through modeling and whole-class instruction. To facilitate comprehension during and after reading, students apply four reading strategies: preview, click and clunk, get the gist, and wrap-up. Graphic organizers are used for scaffolding of these strategies while students work together in cooperative groups. NOTE: This is useful for struggling readers but does not tie directly to the CCSS.
  • Critical Perspectives: Reading and Writing About Slavery
    In this lesson, students critically examine the perspectives of slaves and slave owners.
  • Earth Verse: Using Science in Poetry
    This lesson is a great way to teach both scientific and English content to a class, although the teacher can easily choose another book and subject area. In this lesson, students listen to poems in the book Science Verse by Jon Scieszka.
  • Escaping Slavery: Sweet Clara & the Freedom Quilt
    This lesson, from ReadWriteThink, uses the picture book "Sweet Clara and the Freedom Quilt" by Deborah Hopkinson and an interactive website to enhance students' understanding of the Underground Railroad and slavery. They will create a problems/solutions/events chart to help them understand the relationships between Clara's problems and how she solves them. Similar to Clara's map that shows the path north to freedom, students create their own map designing a key, a compass, and landmarks surrounding their home and school. Students will develop their reading comprehension skills and application of mapping skills.
  • Examining Plot Conflict through a Comparison/Contrast Essay
    In this lesson, students explore picture books to identify the characteristics of four types of conflict: character vs. character, character vs. self, character vs. nature, and character vs. society.
  • It Came From Greek Mythology
    This page contains 6 EDSITEment lessons based around teaching Greek mythology. Students will study basic plots of three Greek myths and discuss three types of themes in Greek myths. They will also explore contemporary uses of terms from Greek mythology and analyze artistic and literary works based on or inspired by Greek myths.
  • Peace Poems and Picasso Doves
    This lesson, from ReadWriteThink, supports third-grade students as they apply think-aloud strategies to reading, as well as to the composition of artwork and poetry. Activities include collaborative as well as individual work. Technology tools are integrated as students research symbols of peace and as they prewrite, compose, and publish their poetry.
  • Shape Poems: Writing Extraordinary Poems About Ordinary Objects
    Students will recognize the characteristics and format of a shape poem; compile a list of content area terms and sensory images (collaboratively as a class and also independently) that relate to a shape or object, as part of the process of brainstorming a word bank for their shape poem; apply spelling knowledge and strategies when brainstorming words for the word bank and writing and revising their shape poem.
  • Teaching Point of View With Two Bad Ants
    This lesson provides students with the opportunity to use illustrations and text to develop an understanding of the point of view of the characters.
  • Using Historical Fiction to Learn About the Civil War
    This lesson uses the book Meet Addy by Connie Porter to teach the characteristics of historical fiction, the making of inferences, the use of visualization, and Civil War history.
  • Using Picture Books to Teach Characterization
    This ReadWriteThink lesson invites students to examine the craft of developing characters through focused experiences with pictures books. Through the careful analysis of character portrayal using the text and illustrations as cues, and online tools such as the ReadWriteThink Story Map, students have the opportunity to build bridges from their own experiences as readers to those skills needed as writers.
  • What Makes Poetry? Exploring Line Breaks
    This lesson, from ReadWriteThink, engages children in exploring various poems and hypothesizing about why lines are broken where they are in poetry. Students then experiment with line breaks and how they affect rhythm, sound, meaning, appearance, and can substitute for punctuation in poetry.
  • Writing Poetry Like Pros
    This set of 4 lesson plans from EDSITEment utilizes poetry to serve as the inspiration for some terrific writing. Using poems available through EDSITEment resources, educators can make poetry an exciting teaching and learning tool in the classroom.
© Utah Education Network in partnership with the Utah State Board of Education and Higher Ed Utah.
UEN does not endorse and is not responsible for content on external websites linked to from this page.
(800) 866-5852     |     KUEN CPB Compliance    |     Web Accessibility     |     Captioning