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RSS Feeds: News Delivered to Your Computer

How do I get started?

What is RSS?
RSS stands for Really Simple Syndication, and it's an easy way to automatically get news and information from all over the web delivered to your computer. An RSS "feed" is simply a tiny file containing summaries of stories and news as they are updated throughout the day. When you subscribe to an RSS feed, that content is automatically delivered directly to your computer whenever it is updated, without your even visiting the Web site. Please follow the 3 easy steps to install and subscribe to a RSS feed.

1 Get an RSS Reader

To get started you will need an RSS Reader.  Here are some free options:

2 Subscribe to an RSS Feed

  • Click on the small RSS or XML button near the RSS feed you want.  You'll see a page displaying XML code.
  • Copy the URL that appears in your browser’s address bar.
    For example, the URL you would copy for UEN’s RSS Feeds are:
    • News RSS:
  • Paste the URL into the "Subscribe" window on your RSS reader.
Here is a list of feeds you may be interested in: http://www.uen.org/feeds/lists.shtml

3 Check your Reader for New Feeds

You should be all set!  The RSS feed will start to display and regularly update the headlines for you.

RSS Frequently Asked Questions

What are RSS Readers?
RSS stands for Really Simple Syndication, and it's an easy way to automatically get news and information from all over the web delivered to your computer. An RSS "feed" is simply a tiny file containing summaries of stories and news as they are updated throughout the day. When you subscribe to an RSS feed, that content is automatically delivered directly to your computer whenever it is updated, without your even visiting the Web site.

Where Can I Get an RSS Reader?
A wide range of RSS readers can be easily downloaded from the Web. Some readers are Web-based while others require you to download a small software program onto your desktop.

What's the difference between RSS and Podcasts?
Not much! RSS Feeds and Podcasts behave very similarly.  You subscribe to one and it automatically appears on your computer without your having to visit a Web site. The big difference is that RSS is text, and podcasts are mainly audio

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