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Text Annotation: Informational Reading Strategy

Main Core Tie

English Language Arts Grade 9-10
Reading: Informational Text Standard 2

Additional Core Ties

English Language Arts Grade 9-10
Reading: Informational Text Standard 3

English Language Arts Grade 9-10
Reading: Informational Text Standard 4

English Language Arts Grade 9-10
Reading: Informational Text Standard 5

English Language Arts Grade 9-10
Reading: Informational Text Standard 6

Time Frame

2 class periods of 45 minutes each

Life Skills

  • Thinking & Reasoning
  • Communication
  • Social & Civic Responsibility

Authors

KIM RATHKE

Summary

Reading, analyzing, and evaluating informational text is a challenge for students. Here are some strategies for helping students complete close reading.


Materials

Attachments

  • Informational reading pieces (newspaper articles, expository essays, textbook)
  • Colored pens or pencils
  • Reading With Your Pen (see attachments)


Background for Teachers

Text Annotation can be used in any content area where students need to read and comprehend written material.

Use annotated articles as springboard for:

  • Class discussions
  • Analysis and evaluation
  • Quiz and test reviews
  • Preparation for class debates or Socratic Seminars


Intended Learning Outcomes

Text Annotation is a reading strategy that requires students to write as they read. While reading, students mark the pages for:

  • Important information
  • Text meaning or key details
  • Ideas and questions


Instructional Procedures

Attachments

Model this close reading strategy with students before assigning individual reading.

  1. Students are individually assigned a text to read.
  2. DO NOT review the text with students other than to introduce the topic to be read or to set the purpose for reading.
  3. Students use the "Reading Pen" palette to annotate text while reading
  4. After reading, students can discuss, review, analyze, evaluate, critique, be quizzed or tested on the material.
  5. The more students practice using annotation, the more automatic and precise they become as critical readers.
  6. Eventually, students become more competent readers if they write while they read.
  7. After reading, students can discuss, review, analyze, evaluate, critique, be quizzed or tested on the material.
  8. The more students practice using annotation, the more automatic and precise they become as critical readers.
  9. Eventually, students become more competent readers if they write while they read.


Strategies for Diverse Learners

Select articles with varying difficulty levels on the same topic to help struggling readers.


Extensions

Use annotated articles as springboard for:

  • Class discussions
  • Analysis and evaluation
  • Quiz and test reviews
  • Preparation for class debates or Socratic Seminars
  • In Fine Arts: teach students to analyze, evaluate and critique pieces using annotation


Assessment Plan

Assessment is determined by teacher based on annotation, quizzes for understanding of material that was assigned.


Bibliography

Gallagher, Kelly. Readicide: How Schools Are Killing Reading and What You Can Do About It. Portland: Stenhouse, 2009. Daniels, Harvey, Nancy Steinke. Texts and Lessons for Content-Area Reading. Heinemann: Portsmouth, 2011.


Created: 05/18/2013
Updated: 02/05/2018
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