What's On UEN-TV

 

Visionaries, The

Bolstered by a co-production relationship with Harvard's Ash Institute, Visionaries presents 6 new shows that celebrate what happens when our inventive spirit is combined with a commitment to the greater good. Sam Waterston leads viewers on an extraordinary odyssey to explore the remarkable capacity Americans have to create positive change in the world. You will meet bold innovators, dynamic social entrepreneurs, and creative problem solvers that are changing lives all across the country and throughout the world.

Visionaries, The  
  • Where Charity and Love Prevail
    Thursday, June 20
    10:30 pm on UEN-TV 9.1
    Catholic Charities of Los Angeles - As the needs of society have grown more complex, how we serve the least of our brethren has turned political. But for 100 years, Catholic Charities of Los Angeles has worked to serve the vulnerable and poor. Starting with soup kitchens and food pantries in an area of LA once known as Charity Street, the agency now operates eight homeless shelters, 18 community centers, and over 50 programs. This episode of the Visionaries will feature three of these programs - youth employment, immigrant rights, and housing services for homeless women and children - and show that whether someone is here legally or illegally, whether they are religious or not, the mission of Catholic Charities of Los Angeles doesn't waver.
  • Where Charity and Love Prevail
    Tuesday, June 25
    3:30 am on UEN-TV 9.1
    Catholic Charities of Los Angeles - As the needs of society have grown more complex, how we serve the least of our brethren has turned political. But for 100 years, Catholic Charities of Los Angeles has worked to serve the vulnerable and poor. Starting with soup kitchens and food pantries in an area of LA once known as Charity Street, the agency now operates eight homeless shelters, 18 community centers, and over 50 programs. This episode of the Visionaries will feature three of these programs - youth employment, immigrant rights, and housing services for homeless women and children - and show that whether someone is here legally or illegally, whether they are religious or not, the mission of Catholic Charities of Los Angeles doesn't waver.
  • Guardians of the Forest
    Thursday, June 27
    10:30 pm on UEN-TV 9.1
    NCI - Twenty-five years ago, as Ivan Gayler flew over the Amazon with his daughter, he saw rainforest burning. Entire sections of lush forest had been torched, cut down and cleared away for timber, agriculture, and oil. The sight brought him to tears: one of the world's last great ecosystems was disappearing before his eyes. At that moment Ivan decided to act. "If not me, then who?" he asked himself. Nature and Culture International was born of that question. "If not me, then who?" It was created from one man's determination to make a difference for the planet. But the organization grew and succeeded from another of Ivan's insights: local and indigenous people are key to conservation success. Conservation must come from and support the local people who depend on these forests and the resources they provide. Twenty years later, Nature and Culture has protected more than 15 million acres of tropical forests and biodiverse ecosystems in South America and Mexico. These forests conserve countless plant and animal species. They provide clean drinking water for millions of people. They preserve the home and cultural traditions of indigenous peoples. And they help mitigate climate change. The Amazon alone stores and sequesters more carbon than any other ecosystem in the world.
  • Guardians of the Forest
    Tuesday, July 2
    3:30 am on UEN-TV 9.1
    NCI - Twenty-five years ago, as Ivan Gayler flew over the Amazon with his daughter, he saw rainforest burning. Entire sections of lush forest had been torched, cut down and cleared away for timber, agriculture, and oil. The sight brought him to tears: one of the world's last great ecosystems was disappearing before his eyes. At that moment Ivan decided to act. "If not me, then who?" he asked himself. Nature and Culture International was born of that question. "If not me, then who?" It was created from one man's determination to make a difference for the planet. But the organization grew and succeeded from another of Ivan's insights: local and indigenous people are key to conservation success. Conservation must come from and support the local people who depend on these forests and the resources they provide. Twenty years later, Nature and Culture has protected more than 15 million acres of tropical forests and biodiverse ecosystems in South America and Mexico. These forests conserve countless plant and animal species. They provide clean drinking water for millions of people. They preserve the home and cultural traditions of indigenous peoples. And they help mitigate climate change. The Amazon alone stores and sequesters more carbon than any other ecosystem in the world.
  • Turning Barriers Into Bridges
    Thursday, July 4
    10:30 pm on UEN-TV 9.1
    Desire Street Ministries - Privilege has become one of those loaded words that we need to reclaim so we can use it to do some good. At Desire Street Ministries, Danny Wuerffel, a former college and professional football player and Heisman winner, is using his platform to address systemic injustices that have existed in this country for centuries. Wuerffel knows that inequities in the schools, in health care, in our criminal justice system won't change unless privileged people like himself speak out and use their social capital to give others a chance. At Desire Street Ministries, Wuerffel and his staff support ministry leaders in under-resourced neighborhoods in states across the South. Statistics show that most leaders in underserved neighborhoods burn out in five years, so Desire Street walks alongside these people, encouraging them to thrive for the long run. "Most people overestimate what they can do in a year or two," says Dr. Anthony Gordon, Desire Street's Senior Ministry Leader. "And they underestimate what they can do in 10 or 20." Desire Street will be there for as long as it takes.
  • Turning Barriers Into Bridges
    Tuesday, July 9
    3:30 am on UEN-TV 9.1
    Desire Street Ministries - Privilege has become one of those loaded words that we need to reclaim so we can use it to do some good. At Desire Street Ministries, Danny Wuerffel, a former college and professional football player and Heisman winner, is using his platform to address systemic injustices that have existed in this country for centuries. Wuerffel knows that inequities in the schools, in health care, in our criminal justice system won't change unless privileged people like himself speak out and use their social capital to give others a chance. At Desire Street Ministries, Wuerffel and his staff support ministry leaders in under-resourced neighborhoods in states across the South. Statistics show that most leaders in underserved neighborhoods burn out in five years, so Desire Street walks alongside these people, encouraging them to thrive for the long run. "Most people overestimate what they can do in a year or two," says Dr. Anthony Gordon, Desire Street's Senior Ministry Leader. "And they underestimate what they can do in 10 or 20." Desire Street will be there for as long as it takes.
  • Creating Communities
    Thursday, July 11
    10:30 pm on UEN-TV 9.1
    Bridge Disability Ministries - Inclusion has become a buzzword among disability rights advocates. But what does it mean? We can install all the wheelchair ramps we want, but until we truly embrace the idea of diversity to include different abilities, nothing will change. Until we approach people with disabilities with curiosity instead of fear, they will continue to be marginalized. And what better place to start this fundamental shift than in church? Bridge Disability Ministries in Seattle, Washington, works to build bridges between people with disabilities and their faith communities. Their equipment ministry helps get people to religious services by providing wheelchairs and other types of medical equipment, while their guardianship program protects people who don't have the capacity to advocate for themselves. Perhaps most innovative, Bridge partners with local churches to make places of worship more welcoming for everyone. Native Hope Storytelling has always been an essential means of transferring and understanding culture. Even now, although the mediums continue to change, stories are how we define the truth about ourselves individually and collectively. This truth is especially evident in Native American communities where for centuries, stories were and continue to be passed through the generations orally. In Chamberlain, South Dakota, an organization called Native Hope is embodying that spirit by using video to capture and amplify the unique stories of young Native Americans across the continent. Their hope is that the power of story can offer a kind of cathartic healing from the social and economic ailments that many Native Americans experience today.
  • Creating Communities
    Tuesday, July 16
    3:30 am on UEN-TV 9.1
    Bridge Disability Ministries - Inclusion has become a buzzword among disability rights advocates. But what does it mean? We can install all the wheelchair ramps we want, but until we truly embrace the idea of diversity to include different abilities, nothing will change. Until we approach people with disabilities with curiosity instead of fear, they will continue to be marginalized. And what better place to start this fundamental shift than in church? Bridge Disability Ministries in Seattle, Washington, works to build bridges between people with disabilities and their faith communities. Their equipment ministry helps get people to religious services by providing wheelchairs and other types of medical equipment, while their guardianship program protects people who don't have the capacity to advocate for themselves. Perhaps most innovative, Bridge partners with local churches to make places of worship more welcoming for everyone. Native Hope Storytelling has always been an essential means of transferring and understanding culture. Even now, although the mediums continue to change, stories are how we define the truth about ourselves individually and collectively. This truth is especially evident in Native American communities where for centuries, stories were and continue to be passed through the generations orally. In Chamberlain, South Dakota, an organization called Native Hope is embodying that spirit by using video to capture and amplify the unique stories of young Native Americans across the continent. Their hope is that the power of story can offer a kind of cathartic healing from the social and economic ailments that many Native Americans experience today.
  • Green Building-A Long Way from Home
    Thursday, July 18
    10:30 pm on UEN-TV 9.1
    Long Way Home - Long Way Home is an organization that constructs homes,schools, and other buildings using trash and reusable materials in Guatemala. The organization, founded by Matt Paneitz, has also created an academy with the goal of teaching these green-building techniques to others. What makes Long Way Home unique is that they understand that putting knowledge and expertise in the hands of those they help is often a missing element in similar building initiatives. They realize that what happens after they leave is just as important as what they do while they're there. Their work combines environmental and social conscience to create beautiful buildings and strengthen communities.
  • Stories from the Streets
    Thursday, July 25
    10:30 pm on UEN-TV 9.1
    BOSS - White people are less likely to be arrested than African Americans - and they are less likely to go to prison when convicted of the very same crime. Children who grow up in poor neighborhoods are 28 percent less likely to finish high school and close to 100 percent less likely to obtain a college degree. Building Opportunities for Self-Sufficiency - or BOSS - believes that your destiny shouldn't be determined by your zip code or the color of your skin. Based in Berkeley, California, they fight against the root causes of poverty and homelessness to achieve greater social equity for all. Offering emergency shelter, job training, re-entry counseling for ex-offenders, and more, BOSS's work is grounded in the belief that when people are given the right kind of support, they can achieve their goals and exceed expectations. Street Stories - Chris Carlisle is an episcopal priest in the Pioneer Valley of Western Massachusetts, where he worked for years as the university chaplain at University of Massachusetts in Amherst. Being surrounded by young students, who he says have become increasingly dubious of organized religion, imbued him with a bit of skepticism on how the church has chosen to address social issues in the 21st century. Known by many of the locals as "Happy Valley", the area has a reputation for being a haven of liberalism and social acceptance. Despite its reputation, it is one of the most economically divided areas in the country. This truth is often obfuscated by the vibrant downtowns of cities like Amherst and Northampton, but neighboring cities like Holyoke, Greenfield and Springfield have struggled to recover from the exodus of factory workers of the last half century. In this episode, we take a look at what Carlisle calls a "return to the Christianity of Christ" and the work he's been doing to uplift and amplify the stories of the poor in his community and beyond.
  • Green Building-A Long Way from Home
    Tuesday, July 30
    3:30 am on UEN-TV 9.1
    Long Way Home - Long Way Home is an organization that constructs homes,schools, and other buildings using trash and reusable materials in Guatemala. The organization, founded by Matt Paneitz, has also created an academy with the goal of teaching these green-building techniques to others. What makes Long Way Home unique is that they understand that putting knowledge and expertise in the hands of those they help is often a missing element in similar building initiatives. They realize that what happens after they leave is just as important as what they do while they're there. Their work combines environmental and social conscience to create beautiful buildings and strengthen communities.
  • Trafficking Solution
    Thursday, August 1
    10:30 pm on UEN-TV 9.1
    Selah Freedom - Selah Freedom is an organization founded by three women in Sarasota Florida who work to eradicate sex trafficking using a new model built on four pillars: Prevention, Outreach, Awareness and Residences. The fact that is lost in the sensational media stories on trafficking, is that this is not just a big city problem. As you are about to see, sex trafficking can take place in any city or town across America. Moreover, the exploited come from every socio-economic background. Selah Freedom works to dispel dangerous misconceptions about the issue so that they can begin to curb the hidden damage it does every day in America and around the world.
  • Stories from the Streets
    Tuesday, August 6
    3:30 am on UEN-TV 9.1
    BOSS - White people are less likely to be arrested than African Americans - and they are less likely to go to prison when convicted of the very same crime. Children who grow up in poor neighborhoods are 28 percent less likely to finish high school and close to 100 percent less likely to obtain a college degree. Building Opportunities for Self-Sufficiency - or BOSS - believes that your destiny shouldn't be determined by your zip code or the color of your skin. Based in Berkeley, California, they fight against the root causes of poverty and homelessness to achieve greater social equity for all. Offering emergency shelter, job training, re-entry counseling for ex-offenders, and more, BOSS's work is grounded in the belief that when people are given the right kind of support, they can achieve their goals and exceed expectations. Street Stories - Chris Carlisle is an episcopal priest in the Pioneer Valley of Western Massachusetts, where he worked for years as the university chaplain at University of Massachusetts in Amherst. Being surrounded by young students, who he says have become increasingly dubious of organized religion, imbued him with a bit of skepticism on how the church has chosen to address social issues in the 21st century. Known by many of the locals as "Happy Valley", the area has a reputation for being a haven of liberalism and social acceptance. Despite its reputation, it is one of the most economically divided areas in the country. This truth is often obfuscated by the vibrant downtowns of cities like Amherst and Northampton, but neighboring cities like Holyoke, Greenfield and Springfield have struggled to recover from the exodus of factory workers of the last half century. In this episode, we take a look at what Carlisle calls a "return to the Christianity of Christ" and the work he's been doing to uplift and amplify the stories of the poor in his community and beyond.
  • A Law Firm Like No Other
    Thursday, August 8
    10:30 pm on UEN-TV 9.1
    Public Advocates - Public Advocates is one of the oldest public interest law firms in the country. It presents a unique blend of principled legal advocacy and community action. They are a leading example of the power communities can wield against corporations, gentrification, and other systemic forces when experienced lawyers join forces with activists. In this episode of the Visionaries, we examine two of their most recent successes: how they were able to convince Facebook to commit to funding affordable housing in the neighborhoods surrounding their headquarters, and the creation of the Local Control Funding Formula, which responsibly allocates education funding to those who need it most.
  • Trafficking Solution
    Tuesday, August 13
    3:30 am on UEN-TV 9.1
    Selah Freedom - Selah Freedom is an organization founded by three women in Sarasota Florida who work to eradicate sex trafficking using a new model built on four pillars: Prevention, Outreach, Awareness and Residences. The fact that is lost in the sensational media stories on trafficking, is that this is not just a big city problem. As you are about to see, sex trafficking can take place in any city or town across America. Moreover, the exploited come from every socio-economic background. Selah Freedom works to dispel dangerous misconceptions about the issue so that they can begin to curb the hidden damage it does every day in America and around the world.
  • A Journey to Justice
    Thursday, August 15
    10:30 pm on UEN-TV 9.1
    The American Law Institute - The American Law Institute was founded in 1923 by a group of legal giants with the goal of simplifying and clarifying laws throughout the United States. In 1962 they published the Model Penal Code, which provided articulate interpretations of every area of law, from murder, to theft, to sexual offenses. Since then, the Institute has periodically gathered hundreds of the world's most prominent legal minds, including scholars, judges, and lawyers, to deliberate with NGOs and advocates, to revisit these codes and adapt them to the modern world. In this episode, we'll visit two of ALI's large gatherings where these experts have come to discuss the issues surrounding sexual assault and Native American law.
  • A Law Firm Like No Other
    Tuesday, August 20
    3:30 am on UEN-TV 9.1
    Public Advocates - Public Advocates is one of the oldest public interest law firms in the country. It presents a unique blend of principled legal advocacy and community action. They are a leading example of the power communities can wield against corporations, gentrification, and other systemic forces when experienced lawyers join forces with activists. In this episode of the Visionaries, we examine two of their most recent successes: how they were able to convince Facebook to commit to funding affordable housing in the neighborhoods surrounding their headquarters, and the creation of the Local Control Funding Formula, which responsibly allocates education funding to those who need it most.
  • The Fight for Children's Rights
    Thursday, August 22
    10:30 pm on UEN-TV 9.1
    Children's Rights - Children's Rights is a national non-profit organization that uses relentless, strategic advocacy and legal action to prevent harm to children. Tennessee is one of the many places across America where Children's Rights has had lasting impact. In 1998, vulnerable children were placed in institutions, and shuttled around, many in 10 or more placements. They suffered trauma unnecessarily. This is the story of how one of the worst child care systems in the country become one of the best, demonstrating what can happen when tenacious legal advocates sit down together with public officials committed to doing the right thing.
  • A Journey to Justice
    Tuesday, August 27
    3:30 am on UEN-TV 9.1
    The American Law Institute - The American Law Institute was founded in 1923 by a group of legal giants with the goal of simplifying and clarifying laws throughout the United States. In 1962 they published the Model Penal Code, which provided articulate interpretations of every area of law, from murder, to theft, to sexual offenses. Since then, the Institute has periodically gathered hundreds of the world's most prominent legal minds, including scholars, judges, and lawyers, to deliberate with NGOs and advocates, to revisit these codes and adapt them to the modern world. In this episode, we'll visit two of ALI's large gatherings where these experts have come to discuss the issues surrounding sexual assault and Native American law.
  • Americans Fighting for Consumer Rights
    Thursday, August 29
    10:30 pm on UEN-TV 9.1
    National Consumer Law Center - In modern society, millions of people have little voice or power in an economy increasingly controlled by big corporations. But, all across the country, in big cities and small towns, a remarkable group of people are committed to the idea that the law can be a tool for empowering consumers and advancing economic justice. The National Consumer Law Center, NCLC, is a network of legal advocates who are dedicated to taking on big banks, financial services companies, predatory lenders, and their allies in Washington, DC. They work to protect vulnerable people from unfair, deceptive, and abusive practices, and promote the long-term financial health and security of those most in need.
  • The Fight for Children's Rights
    Tuesday, September 3
    3:30 am on UEN-TV 9.1
    Children's Rights - Children's Rights is a national non-profit organization that uses relentless, strategic advocacy and legal action to prevent harm to children. Tennessee is one of the many places across America where Children's Rights has had lasting impact. In 1998, vulnerable children were placed in institutions, and shuttled around, many in 10 or more placements. They suffered trauma unnecessarily. This is the story of how one of the worst child care systems in the country become one of the best, demonstrating what can happen when tenacious legal advocates sit down together with public officials committed to doing the right thing.
  • Islands of Change
    Thursday, September 5
    10:30 pm on UEN-TV 9.1
    Child Family Service - In the beginning it was as simple as one person helping another. Someone was in need of food, or shelter, or maybe they were sick. You gave them what they needed. Life... and philanthropy, is more complex now. We need organizations that can help those in need, while also addressing a myriad of social and economic issues-the issues that caused that need in the first place. This is a story about a non-profit organization that has elegantly merged bold risk-taking with outcome driven, evidence-based programs that are helping thousands of children. But the real power of their story is the interplay of innovation and accountability that can inspire an extraordinary level of creative thinking across America.
  • Americans Fighting for Consumer Rights
    Tuesday, September 10
    3:30 am on UEN-TV 9.1
    National Consumer Law Center - In modern society, millions of people have little voice or power in an economy increasingly controlled by big corporations. But, all across the country, in big cities and small towns, a remarkable group of people are committed to the idea that the law can be a tool for empowering consumers and advancing economic justice. The National Consumer Law Center, NCLC, is a network of legal advocates who are dedicated to taking on big banks, financial services companies, predatory lenders, and their allies in Washington, DC. They work to protect vulnerable people from unfair, deceptive, and abusive practices, and promote the long-term financial health and security of those most in need.
  • Islands of Change
    Tuesday, September 17
    3:30 am on UEN-TV 9.1
    Child Family Service - In the beginning it was as simple as one person helping another. Someone was in need of food, or shelter, or maybe they were sick. You gave them what they needed. Life... and philanthropy, is more complex now. We need organizations that can help those in need, while also addressing a myriad of social and economic issues-the issues that caused that need in the first place. This is a story about a non-profit organization that has elegantly merged bold risk-taking with outcome driven, evidence-based programs that are helping thousands of children. But the real power of their story is the interplay of innovation and accountability that can inspire an extraordinary level of creative thinking across America.

 

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  • The Shelter for Abused Women and Children
    Tuesday, June 18
    3:30 am on UEN-TV 9.1
    The Shelter for Abused Women and Children: The mission of The Shelter for Abused Women and Children is to lead the community to prevent, protect, and prevail over domestic violence and human trafficking through advocacy, empowerment, and social change. They offer a 60-bed emergency shelter, outreach services, school-based prevention programs, transitional housing, an onsite kennel, legal advocacy, counseling, and support programs. All of their services are provided free of charge.
  • The Shelter for Abused Women and Children
    Thursday, June 13
    10:30 pm on UEN-TV 9.1
    The Shelter for Abused Women and Children: The mission of The Shelter for Abused Women and Children is to lead the community to prevent, protect, and prevail over domestic violence and human trafficking through advocacy, empowerment, and social change. They offer a 60-bed emergency shelter, outreach services, school-based prevention programs, transitional housing, an onsite kennel, legal advocacy, counseling, and support programs. All of their services are provided free of charge.
  • Solidarity Bridge
    Tuesday, June 11
    3:30 am on UEN-TV 9.1
    For many news organizations, it's often easier to share hard stories of violence and destitution than it is to convey the subtleties of the respectful and sustainable work needed to build a better world. It is precisely these subtleties that define Solidarity Bridge, which empowers medical communities in Bolivia to serve those in need. By building relationships based on mutual respect and fostering solidarity among all who participate, Solidarity Bridge ensures that the impact of each of their medical missions to Bolivia grows exponentially - in both measureable and immeasurable ways. This episode of the Visionaries follows a team of surgeons from the U.S. over the course of a mission visit to several public hospitals in Bolivia. These American surgeons from Solidarity Bridge are not here to "bestow" their knowledge onto their Bolivian peers but to partner with and empower these local doctors to go on to serve as healers and mentors in their own communities. The role of Solidarity Bridge's organizational partner in Bolivia, Puente de Solidaridad, is also a key to the Chicago-based non-profit's success. Working together, these sister organizations are transforming lives by promoting solidarity and justice through the experiences of service and healing.
  • Solidarity Bridge
    Thursday, June 6
    10:30 pm on UEN-TV 9.1
    For many news organizations, it's often easier to share hard stories of violence and destitution than it is to convey the subtleties of the respectful and sustainable work needed to build a better world. It is precisely these subtleties that define Solidarity Bridge, which empowers medical communities in Bolivia to serve those in need. By building relationships based on mutual respect and fostering solidarity among all who participate, Solidarity Bridge ensures that the impact of each of their medical missions to Bolivia grows exponentially - in both measureable and immeasurable ways. This episode of the Visionaries follows a team of surgeons from the U.S. over the course of a mission visit to several public hospitals in Bolivia. These American surgeons from Solidarity Bridge are not here to "bestow" their knowledge onto their Bolivian peers but to partner with and empower these local doctors to go on to serve as healers and mentors in their own communities. The role of Solidarity Bridge's organizational partner in Bolivia, Puente de Solidaridad, is also a key to the Chicago-based non-profit's success. Working together, these sister organizations are transforming lives by promoting solidarity and justice through the experiences of service and healing.
  • Becoming Independent and Toward Independent Living and Learning
    Tuesday, June 4
    3:30 am on UEN-TV 9.1
    Due to shifting demographics and radical changes in government funding models for people with disabilities (PWDs), the old paradigm of congregate service settings for PWDs is being phased out across the country in favor of inclusive opportunities for work and social activities. With its pioneering model of breaking barriers for people with disabilities through authentic human connection, Becoming Independent (BI) has become a game changer in finding ways to embrace this new paradigm. This is a massive shift for BI - and the entire field of human services - but its staff are determined to replace what used to be known as "sheltered workshops" with full community engagement opportunities. With that goal in mind, the organization has become one of California's most progressive and successful agencies for adults with special needs, including autism, cerebral palsy, epilepsy, and intellectual impairments. What began as a grassroots, parent-led organization 50 years ago has grown into the largest service provider of its kind in the North Bay region of California, serving nearly a thousand people every year. The story of TILL - Toward Independent Living and Learning - begins in 1980 at the height of deinstitutionalization in Massachusetts. The goal of TILL then and now is for every person to feel that they have a place and a value because of their ability rather than their disability. Because of TILL's efforts and those of human services agencies like it, life for people with disabilities (PWDs) has dramatically changed over the last few decades. Rather than being defined by their limitations, PWDs at places like TILL are recognized for what they can do and challenged to meet new goals every day. TILL seeks to teach people the value of every person so that those who are differently-abled can be recognized as part of the fabric of the greater community.
  • Becoming Independent and Toward Independent Living and Learning
    Thursday, May 30
    10:30 pm on UEN-TV 9.1
    Due to shifting demographics and radical changes in government funding models for people with disabilities (PWDs), the old paradigm of congregate service settings for PWDs is being phased out across the country in favor of inclusive opportunities for work and social activities. With its pioneering model of breaking barriers for people with disabilities through authentic human connection, Becoming Independent (BI) has become a game changer in finding ways to embrace this new paradigm. This is a massive shift for BI - and the entire field of human services - but its staff are determined to replace what used to be known as "sheltered workshops" with full community engagement opportunities. With that goal in mind, the organization has become one of California's most progressive and successful agencies for adults with special needs, including autism, cerebral palsy, epilepsy, and intellectual impairments. What began as a grassroots, parent-led organization 50 years ago has grown into the largest service provider of its kind in the North Bay region of California, serving nearly a thousand people every year. The story of TILL - Toward Independent Living and Learning - begins in 1980 at the height of deinstitutionalization in Massachusetts. The goal of TILL then and now is for every person to feel that they have a place and a value because of their ability rather than their disability. Because of TILL's efforts and those of human services agencies like it, life for people with disabilities (PWDs) has dramatically changed over the last few decades. Rather than being defined by their limitations, PWDs at places like TILL are recognized for what they can do and challenged to meet new goals every day. TILL seeks to teach people the value of every person so that those who are differently-abled can be recognized as part of the fabric of the greater community.
  • Assistance League of Los Angeles
    Tuesday, May 28
    3:30 am on UEN-TV 9.1
    Assistance League of Los Angeles serves the most vulnerable children living in extreme poverty, foster care, or homelessness in LA. They have five programs that include a preschool, an arts education through live children's theatre, and programs that provide clothing, hygiene products and school supplies to at-risk youth. Their goal is to get children to go to and stay in school by operating programs that help provide basic needs. Their network of compassionate volunteers includes adults and teens alike, ensuring their philanthropy continues through generations to come.
  • Assistance League of Los Angeles
    Thursday, May 23
    10:30 pm on UEN-TV 9.1
    Assistance League of Los Angeles serves the most vulnerable children living in extreme poverty, foster care, or homelessness in LA. They have five programs that include a preschool, an arts education through live children's theatre, and programs that provide clothing, hygiene products and school supplies to at-risk youth. Their goal is to get children to go to and stay in school by operating programs that help provide basic needs. Their network of compassionate volunteers includes adults and teens alike, ensuring their philanthropy continues through generations to come.
  • Free Wheelchair Mission
    Tuesday, May 21
    3:30 am on UEN-TV 9.1
    Don Schoendorfer, a biomechanical engineer, founded Free Wheelchair Mission after witnessing the plight of a woman with disabilities dragging herself across a road in Morocco. Haunted by her image, Schoendorfer used his MIT training to develop a low-cost, durable, functional wheelchair that would become the cornerstone of Free Wheelchair Mission, which he started in 2001 to serve people with disabilities in developing countries. Worldwide, an estimated 100 million people are in dire need of a wheelchair but lack the resources to obtain one. Many are forced to live on the ground or must wait to be carried to meet their most basic needs. Free Wheelchair Mission's goal is to deliver 100,000 wheelchairs annually to the poorest of the poor - in some of the most remote regions of the world. This episode of the Visionaries follows Schoendorfer to Ayacucho, Peru, where he will make one of the most significant deliveries of his life - Free Wheelchair Mission's millionth wheelchair. This story is a celebration of the lives that have been changed - the children who can now attend school and the parents who can support their families - because of Schoendorfer's wheelchairs, which are often the first step toward dignity in a more inclusive world.
  • Free Wheelchair Mission
    Thursday, May 16
    10:30 pm on UEN-TV 9.1
    Don Schoendorfer, a biomechanical engineer, founded Free Wheelchair Mission after witnessing the plight of a woman with disabilities dragging herself across a road in Morocco. Haunted by her image, Schoendorfer used his MIT training to develop a low-cost, durable, functional wheelchair that would become the cornerstone of Free Wheelchair Mission, which he started in 2001 to serve people with disabilities in developing countries. Worldwide, an estimated 100 million people are in dire need of a wheelchair but lack the resources to obtain one. Many are forced to live on the ground or must wait to be carried to meet their most basic needs. Free Wheelchair Mission's goal is to deliver 100,000 wheelchairs annually to the poorest of the poor - in some of the most remote regions of the world. This episode of the Visionaries follows Schoendorfer to Ayacucho, Peru, where he will make one of the most significant deliveries of his life - Free Wheelchair Mission's millionth wheelchair. This story is a celebration of the lives that have been changed - the children who can now attend school and the parents who can support their families - because of Schoendorfer's wheelchairs, which are often the first step toward dignity in a more inclusive world.
  • Friends of the Children (Fotc)
    Tuesday, May 14
    3:30 am on UEN-TV 9.1
    Friends of the Children (FOTC) is an early intervention program whose mission is to help our nation's highest risk children develop the relationships, goals, and skills necessary to break the cycles of poverty, abuse, and violence by developing into contributing members of society. They begin by identifying children who are at risk of being trapped in poverty because of their vulnerability to school failure, drug involvement, and teen pregnancy. The young people often come from a background of poverty and homelessness and experience neglect, abuse, and domestic violence. FOTC employs trained, salaried, professional mentors called Friends - this is their full-time job. By moving out of the volunteer realm of a mentor, FOTC ensures quality, consistency, and commitment for youth.
  • Friends of the Children (Fotc)
    Thursday, May 9
    10:30 pm on UEN-TV 9.1
    Friends of the Children (FOTC) is an early intervention program whose mission is to help our nation's highest risk children develop the relationships, goals, and skills necessary to break the cycles of poverty, abuse, and violence by developing into contributing members of society. They begin by identifying children who are at risk of being trapped in poverty because of their vulnerability to school failure, drug involvement, and teen pregnancy. The young people often come from a background of poverty and homelessness and experience neglect, abuse, and domestic violence. FOTC employs trained, salaried, professional mentors called Friends - this is their full-time job. By moving out of the volunteer realm of a mentor, FOTC ensures quality, consistency, and commitment for youth.
  • Aldea
    Tuesday, May 7
    3:30 am on UEN-TV 9.1
    In 1959, a young doctor named Carroll Behrhorst journeyed to Guatemala as a medical missionary. What he saw through his travels was that in rural areas, particularly in indigenous communities, people did not have access to healthcare. Several years later, he formed a clinic in Chimaltenango that eventually would become a non-profit called ALDEA. Behrhorst's philosophy was simple but visionary - people can and will lead their own development. He firmly believed that Guatemalans had the capacity to solve their own problems - an approach that is still critical to ALDEA's mission today. The organization works to develop the leadership and problem-solving skills of Guatemalans to address the root causes of poverty and malnutrition. ALDEA focuses on clean water, sanitation, hygiene, food security, and, most important, good nutrition during the first 1,000 days of a child's life. One village at a time, they are changing the landscape of Guatemala, providing a lifetime of lasting benefits for generations to come.
  • Aldea
    Thursday, May 2
    10:30 pm on UEN-TV 9.1
    In 1959, a young doctor named Carroll Behrhorst journeyed to Guatemala as a medical missionary. What he saw through his travels was that in rural areas, particularly in indigenous communities, people did not have access to healthcare. Several years later, he formed a clinic in Chimaltenango that eventually would become a non-profit called ALDEA. Behrhorst's philosophy was simple but visionary - people can and will lead their own development. He firmly believed that Guatemalans had the capacity to solve their own problems - an approach that is still critical to ALDEA's mission today. The organization works to develop the leadership and problem-solving skills of Guatemalans to address the root causes of poverty and malnutrition. ALDEA focuses on clean water, sanitation, hygiene, food security, and, most important, good nutrition during the first 1,000 days of a child's life. One village at a time, they are changing the landscape of Guatemala, providing a lifetime of lasting benefits for generations to come.