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TRB 4:5 - Investigation 7 - Classification Schemes

Group Size:
Small Groups


 

Summary:
Students will place organisms into the correct classification and justify their reasoning.

Main Curriculum Tie:
Science - 4th Grade
Standard 5 Objective 3

Use a simple scheme to classify Utah plants and animals.

Materials:

Optional:

  • overhead pictures of Utah plants and animals for the teacher to use

Attachments

Web Sites

Background For Teachers:

In 1753, Carolus Linnaeus, a scientist from Sweden, created the first known system to classify all known living things in that time period. Linnaeus divided all living organisms into two large groups known as kingdoms: Plantae and Animalia. Since then more and more organisms have been identified and the classification system has grown. Recent studies suggest five kingdoms: Plantae, Animalia, Fungi, Protista and Monera.

Remember not to tell the students what groups the organisms go into. Students must be able to place them into groups and justify their reasoning. As long as a student can state the common characteristic for their group and create a scheme for it, then they have learned to classify.


Intended Learning Outcomes:
1. Use science process and thinking skills
3. Understand science concepts and principles

Instructional Procedures:

Pre-Assessment/Invitation to Learn

Give the students an opportunity to classify objects such as buttons, cereal, Chex Party Mix, shoes, or potato chips. Let the students classify the objects into groups and have them describe their reasoning. Remember the students must be able to include all objects and a reason for their decisions. This can be done as a class using a chalkboard or overhead.

Instructional Procedure

  1. Hand out the plant and animal pictures for the students to cut out and the Classification worksheet (pdf).
  2. In small groups, let the students classify the pictures into groups and record their classification schemes on the classification worksheet. See how many groups the students can come up with. Walk around the room to provide extra clues and check classification schemes and groups. Following are some examples of groups.

    Lives in Wetlands Lives in Desert Lives in Forest
    bulrush
    cattails
    beaver
    frog
    salamanders
    muskrat
    catfish
    carp
    trout
    prickly pear cactus
    sagebrush
    jackrabbit
    cottontail rabbit
    coyote
    deer mouse
    kangaroo rat
    red-tailed hawk
    gopher snake
    rattlesnake
    desert tortoise
    lizard
    pinyon jay
    mule deer
    elk
    moose
    cougar
    bobcat
    barn owl
    red fox
    lark/robin
    magpie
    crow
    spruce
    fir
    quaking aspen
    cottonwood
    Mammals Birds Reptiles
    jackrabbit
    cottontail rabbit
    red fox
    coyote
    mule deer
    elk/moose
    cougar
    bobcat
    deermouse
    kangaroo rat
    muskrat
    beaver
    red-tailed hawk
    barn owl
    lark
    robin
    pinyon jay
    magpie
    crow
    gopher snake
    rattlesnake
    lizard
    tortoise
    Insects Fish
    grasshopper
    ant
    moth
    butterfly
    housefly
    bee
    wasp
    pill bug
    millipede
    carp
    trout
    catfish

  3. Other ideas for classifying groups can include: What do the animals eat? carnivore, herbivore, and omnivore. What covers their body? hair, scales, and feathers. What is it? plant or animal. As long as the students can provide a solid reason for their classification scheme that satisfy all the pictures in their group, they have classified the organism.
  4. Have each group of students explain their classification system to the class.

Extensions:

Language Arts-

  • Have the students answer the following questions in their science journal. Journal entry: What does it mean to classify? Give some examples of what other groups of classification that the class came up with. Do you agree with these groups of classification schemes? Why or why not?

Science-

  • Give the students different pictures of Utah animals to see if they can create classification schemes. (ILO 1)

Homework & Family Connections
As a family, find some objects they can classify: tools; a can of miscellaneous nuts, bolts, nails, and screws; toys; shoes; etc. Have students share what they classified in class.


Assessment Plan:

  • Show students pictures of additional animals and see if it fits into their classification groups.

Author:
Utah LessonPlans

Created Date :
Aug 11 2004 14:48 PM

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