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NHMU: Insect Family Tree

Curriculum Tie:

Group Size:
Individual


 

Summary:
Students will identify and match insects on the Insect Family Tree.

Main Curriculum Tie:
Science - 4th Grade
Standard 5 Objective 3

Use a simple scheme to classify Utah plants and animals.

Career Connections:

  • Entomologist

Materials:


Attachments

Background For Teachers:
Below are six classifications scientists use to identify and group insects according to their individual and shared characteristics.

  • Hymenoptera: means membranous wing; Hymen = membrane, ptera = wings. Winged forms of ants, bees and wasps possess 2 pair of membranous wings.
  • Lepidoptera: means scale wings; lepido = scale, ptera = wings. Wings of butterflies and moths are often covered with a colorful mosaic of minute scales.
  • Diptera: means two wings; di = two, ptera = wings. Flies do very well with their single pair of fore wings. The hind pair are often reduced to a couple of knob-like balance organs.
  • Coleoptera: means sheath wings; coleo = sheath, ptera = wings. Beetles front pair of wings are modified to hardened casings, known as elytra, to protect the hind wings and body below.
  • Odonata: means tooth. Apart from jet propulsion, the aquatic nymph often possess an extendable jaw capable of catching prey some distance away from the rest of the head.
  • Arthropod: means segmented feet; arthro = joint, poda = foot. Including insects, this huge group contains animals often mistaken for insects such as spiders and centipedes.

Instructional Procedures:

  • Have students read the Insect Families Handout as a class or individually. Next, students should cut out the pictures at the bottom of the Handout and paste them onto the Insect Family Tree onto the appropriate square.

Bibliography:
This lesson plan was developed by the Utah Museum of Natural History.

Author:
Utah LessonPlans

Created Date :
Nov 08 2004 09:40 AM

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