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Personal Strengths, Talents, and Goals

Life Skills:

  • Thinking & Reasoning
  • Communication
  • Employability
  • Social & Civic Responsibility

Curriculum Tie:

Time Frame:
4 class periods that run 15 minutes each.

Group Size:
Small Groups


 

Summary:
Students make a movie/slide show presentation about the unique strengths, talents, and goals of class members.

Main Curriculum Tie:
Health Education - 4th Grade
Standard 2 Objective 1

Discover personal strengths and talents that make one unique. *PD

Career Connections:

  • Personnel Director

Materials:

  • Video camera or computer with slide show software
  • Reading texts
  • Student Talents and Goals Handout
  • Lined paper for each student

Background For Teachers:
Movie making and editing, or slide show presentations.

Student Prior Knowledge:
Personal strengths and abilities.
Movie making and editing, or slide show presentations.

Intended Learning Outcomes:
Students will identify their unique talents and strengths, and demonstrate the ability to set and achieve goals.

Instructional Procedures:
Read the text in Open Court or Houghton Mifflin (refer to the bibliography below) and discuss the talents of the characters. Talk about what a talent is and how people get them. Discuss natural and acquired talents.

Give the students a lined paper and have them write at least 4 of their personal talents or strengths. Allow them time to work with a small group so that group members can help name each other’s talents or strengths.

Inform students that you are going to make a movie (or slide show presentation) with each small group (since a whole class movie would be too long, it would be easier to watch several small group presentations.)Each presentation needs to include:

1. What talents/strengths are.
2. How you get them.
3. How they make you unique.
4. How they help you to be physically, mentally, and socially healthy.
5. Who your audience is.
6. Choose a format, such as, a advertisement, documentary, story, political campaign, game show, etc.
7. One talent of each member of the group.
Tell students that their presentations will be shared with the class.

After viewing the movies/presentations, ask students to write down one talent/strength that they would like to improve on during the year. Have them write down a goal that they think they can reach this school year. Instruct them to write down what they need to do to reach that goal. Inform students that at the end of the year, they are going to review their goals and make a sequel to their movie/presentation.

Attachments

Strategies For Diverse Learners:
English Language Learners can do their portion of the presentation in their native language with subtitles or some sort of translation into English.

Extensions:
At the end of the year, make a sequel to the first movie/presentation to show how students have made progress on their goals. Include ways that their goal achievement has affected their physical, social, and mental health.

Assessment Plan:
Have students help you rate student presentations according to the rubric

Rubric:

Bibliography:
Any of these selections would be good examples for personal strengths, talents, and goals. Houghton Mifflin:

Soto, Gary. “The Marble Champ.” Imagine, Invitations to Literacy. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1996. p. 405.

Open Court:

Pearce, Carol Ann. “Amelia Earhart, Fly On.” Collections For Young Scholars. Chicago: Open Court Publishing, 1995. Vol. 4(1).
Miklowitz, Gloria D. and Yates, Madeleine. “Gregg Nevarez, Young Tycoon.” Collections For Young Scholars. Chicago: Open Court Publishing, 1995. Vol. 4(1).
Paris-Chitanvis, Jacquelin. “Dorothy Brunson: the Making of an Entrepreneur.” Collections For Young Scholars. Chicago: Open Court Publishing, 1995. Vol. 4(1).
Brown, Marion Marsh. “The Story of Susan La Flesche Picotte.” Collections For Young Scholars. Chicago: Open Court Publishing, 1995. Vol. 4(1).
Ferris, Jeri. “Arctic Explorer: The Story of Matthew Henson.” Collections For Young Scholars. Chicago: Open Court Publishing, 1995. Vol. 4(2).
Sender, Ruth Minsky. “The Cage.” Collections For Young Scholars. Chicago: Open Court Publishing, 1995. Vol. 4(2).
Wymer, Norman. “George Stephenson.” Collections For Young Scholars. Chicago: Open Court Publishing, 1995. Vol. 4(2).
Altman, Susan. “Phyllis Wheatley: Poet.” Collections For Young Scholars. Chicago: Open Court Publishing, 1995. Vol. 4(2).
Hughes, Langston. “Freedom.” Collections For Young Scholars. Chicago: Open Court Publishing, 1995. Vol. 4(2).
Sapp, Karen. “Paul Cuffe.” Collections For Young Scholars. Chicago: Open Court Publishing, 1995. Vol. 4(2).

Open Court Interventions:

Russo, Frank. “The First Woman Doctor.” Intervention Guide, Open Court Reading. Columbus: SRA/McGraw Hill, 2000. p. 162.
Beckmore, Shirley. “Sweet Success.” Intervention Guide, Open Court Reading. Columbus: SRA/McGraw Hill, 2000. p. 112.
Burns, Joan. “Grinning the Bark Off a Tree.” Intervention Guide, Open Court Reading. Columbus: SRA/McGraw Hill, 2000. p. 204.

Author:
MARIANNE AMATANGELO

Created Date :
Jul 13 2002 15:07 PM

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