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Wayne County

Wayne County’s early residents were a diverse group of mammals. The sloth, horse, mammoth, and bison all have left evidence of their lives here within the county borders. There also is evidence of the Archaic and Fremont Native American cultures living here with sites that date as far back as 6300 B.C. and up to A.D. 450. The pioneer settlers didn’t make it into this remote area until the 1880’s. When the U.S. government had work programs to build roads and campgrounds, the area grew both in the number of residents and towns. The county courthouse in Loa was built with funds earned by residents of the county during the depression-era. Ranchers have also used the area for raising cattle.

Today the total number of square miles (2,486) exceeds the number of people living in Wayne County (2,454 as of 2003). The state and federal governments run over 97% of the land. The county’s main attraction and income is tourism at Capitol Reef National Park. The park gives the visitor a chance to drive, hike, and camp among the large and unique rock formations found in the area.


Historic Fruita School House in Capitol Reef National Park.

Wayne County High School is in Bicknell, Utah.

Capitol Reef National Park is characterized by spectacular red rock scenery.

More information for Wayne County can be found at the following sites:

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