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Positive Role Models

Life Skills:

  • Employability
  • Social & Civic Responsibility

Time Frame:
1 class period that runs 45 minutes.

Group Size:
Small Groups


 

Summary:
Student read literature selections about positive role models, identify positive characteristics, and choose characteristics they would like to emulate.

Main Curriculum Tie:
Health Education - 4th Grade
Standard 2 Objective 2

Identify the qualities of positive role models. *PD

Career Connections:

  • Administration
  • Politics

Materials:

  • Internet access
  • Optional homework assignment (parent interview)
  • Pictures of role models (extension activity)
  • Reading texts (extension activity)
  • Strips of chart paper

Background For Teachers:
Learn about role models from Utah History and the cultures that your students represent.

Student Prior Knowledge:
Ask students about role models from their cultures. For the extension activity, students could be given a homework assignment to ask their parents about role models in their culture.

Intended Learning Outcomes:
Identify and incorporate positive attitudes into one’s own life.

Instructional Procedures:
Students work in small groups to read about a prominent figure in Utah history, such as, Dominguez and Escalante, Jim Bridger, Brigham Young, Heber Wells, Martha Hughes Cannon, John Wesley Powell, John C. Fremont, Jake Garn, Thomas Leiper Kane, Peter Skene Ogden, Etienne Provost, Kanosh, Blackhawk, Posey, Hoskaninni, Ouray, or Wakara.

Write their positive or negative characteristics on strips of chart paper.

Sort the characteristics according to those that show a positive attitude or negative attitude.

Determine which attitudes help the most people to be the most productive. Have students give reasons or evidence for their answers. Remind students that the circumstances people lived in influenced their choices. Have students determine whether the person they researched was a positive or negative role model. Have them give the reasons for their choice.

Have students select and record characteristics and attitudes that they would like to incorporate in their lives.


Web Sites

Strategies For Diverse Learners:
In the list of role models, include both males and females, people from various cultures (groups of people are listed on the Utah History web site), physical and intellectual abilities, and talents.

If others in the class are unfamiliar with these role models, encourage the diverse learner to tell the class about the role model. For English Language Learners, encourage the student to explain as much as he/she is able by having another student help translate, explaining as much as he/she is able, showing pictures, articles, or artifacts from home. The teacher can find out about famous role models and help explain to the class.


Extensions:
As students read in their reading textbooks, encourage them to look at the characters' characteristics and determine what kind of role model the person is.

Collect pictures of famous people. (Students could draw pictures if printed pictures are not available.)

Sort into 4 groups according to the time period the person lived in (if using historical figures) or according to individuals' characteristics.

Use the pictures to make a collage on a four-sided box (top and bottom removed). Arrange the pictures so that there is one time period or characteristic represented on each of the four sides.

Label and list characteristics on each side of the box. Hang the display in the classroom or set it on a table where students can move around and see each side.


Assessment Plan:
Sort characteristics of role models according to positive or negative attitudes and justify responses.

Rubric:

Bibliography:
Houghton Mifflin:

Cavan, Seamus. “Thurgood Marshal and Equal Rights.” Imagine, Invitations to Literacy. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1995. p. 427.

Open Court:

Pearce, Carol Ann. “Amelia Earhart, Fly On.” Collections For Young Scholars. Chicago: Open Court Publishing, 1995. Vol. 4(1).
Freedman, Florence B. “Two Tickets To Freedom.” Collections For Young Scholars. Chicago: Open Court Publishing, 1995. Vol. 4(1).
Miklowitz, Gloria D. and Yates, Madeleine. “Gregg Nevarez, Young Tycoon.” Collections For Young Scholars. Chicago: Open Court Publishing, 1995. Vol. 4(1).
Paris-Chitanvis, Jacquelin. “Dorothy Brunson: the Making of an Entrepreneur.” Collections For Young Scholars. Chicago: Open Court Publishing, 1995. Vol. 4(1).
Brown, Marion Marsh. “The Story of Susan La Flesche Picotte.” Collections For Young Scholars. Chicago: Open Court Publishing, 1995. Vol. 4(1).
Patterson, Lillie. “Sewed Up His Heart.” Collections For Young Scholars. Chicago: Open Court Publishing, 1995. Vol. 4(1).
Ferris, Jeri. “Arctic Explorer: The Story of Matthew Henson.” from Collections For Young Scholars. Chicago: Open Court Publishing, 1995. Vol. 4(2).
Sender, Ruth Minsky. “The Cage.” Collections For Young Scholars. Chicago: Open Court Publishing, 1995. Vol. 4(2).
Wiley. “Music and Slavery.”. Collections For Young Scholars. Chicago: Open Court Publishing, 1995. Vol. 4(2).
Wymer, Norman. “George Stephenson.” Collections For Young Scholars. Chicago: Open Court Publishing, 1995. Vol. 4(2).
Fradin, Dennis B. “Pocahontas.” Collections For Young Scholars. Chicago: Open Court Publishing, 1995. Vol. 4(2).
Altman, Susan. “Phyllis Wheatley: Poet.” Collections For Young Scholars. Chicago: Open Court Publishing, 1995. Vol. 4(2).
Sapp, Karen. “Paul Cuffe.” Collections For Young Scholars. Chicago: Open Court Publishing, 1995. Vol. 4(2).

Open Court Intervention Guide:

Searl, Duncan. “Rosa Parks Makes History.” Intervention Guide, Open Court Reading. Columbus: SRA/McGraw Hill, 2000. p. 46.
Dalin, Joan. “A Peaceful Warrior.” Intervention Guide, Open Court Reading. Columbus: SRA/McGraw Hill, 2000. p.54.
Russo, Frank. “The First Woman Doctor.” Intervention Guide, Open Court Reading. Columbus: SRA/McGraw Hill, 2000. p.162.
Reese, Morgan. “The Hiding Place.” Intervention Guide, Open Court Reading. Columbus: SRA/McGraw Hill, 2000. p.220.
Howell, Rob. “Sequoya’s New Alphabet.” Intervention Guide, Open Court Reading. Columbus: SRA/McGraw Hill, 2000. p. 246.
Beckmore, Shirley. “Sweet Success.” Intervention Guide, Open Court Reading. Columbus: SRA/McGraw Hill, 2000. p. 112.
Burns, Joan. “Grinning the Bark Off a Tree.” Intervention Guide, Open Court Reading. Columbus: SRA/McGraw Hill, 2000. p. 204.

Trade Books:

Walter, Mildred Pitts. Justin and the Best Biscuits.

Author:
MARIANNE AMATANGELO

Created Date :
Jul 13 2002 15:50 PM

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