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Language Arts - Secondary Curriculum
Language Arts - 10th Grade
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Lesson Plans  
 
Standard 1
(Reading): Students will use vocabulary development and an understanding of text elements and structures to comprehend literary and informational grade level text.
 
Thinkfinity Lesson Plans   Lesson Plans
  • A Storybook Romance
    This lesson from EDSITEment highlights one episode in the Divine Comedy to provide students with an introduction to Dante's great poem. Learning objectives include (1) To learn about the structure and artistry of Dante's Divine Comedy; (2) To examine the episode of Paolo and Francesca as a poetic interpretation of romantic love; (3) To gain experience in close reading and interpretation of literary allusions.
  • Chaucer's Wife of Bath
    This lesson from EDSITEment introduces students to one of the most admired characterizations in Chaucer's "The Canterbury Tales" the Wife of Bath. Learning Objectives include (1) To analyze Chaucer's portrayal of the Wife of Bath in The Canterbury Tales; (2) To consider how the story told by the Wife of Bath reflects on both her character and on Chaucer's view of marriage and women; (3) To examine literary sources that contributed to this characterization; (4) To explore the historical context that informs this depiction of the rights of women in marriage.
  • Chinua Achebe's Things Fall Apart
    This lesson, found on the EDSITEment website, introduces students to African novelist Chinua Achebe's first novel, "Things Fall Apart," and to strategies of close reading and textual analysis. Through this lesson, students learn about Nigerian culture and history and compare African oral storytelling traditions with European linguistic and literary forms. From this page, teachers can access all the materials needed to complete this lesson.
  • Exploring Arthurian Legend
    In this lesson from EDSITEment, students will examine the historical origins of the Arthurian legend. Students will gain insight into the use of literature as historical evidence. Through the references and links in this lesson, students can track the growth of a legend like that of King Arthur, from its emergence in the Medieval Ages to its arrival on the silver screen.
  • Families in Bondage
    This two-part lesson plan draws on letters written by African Americans in slavery and by free blacks to loved ones still in bondage, singling out a few among the many slave experiences to offer students a glimpse into slavery and its effects on African American family life. Through these letters, students explore some of the ways African Americans sought to overcome this anguish.
  • Holocaust and Resistance
    In this lesson from EDSITEment, students reflect on the Holocaust from the point of view of those who actively resisted Nazi persecution. Students will learn how the Holocaust happened and understand the devastation suffered by its victims; examine the evidence of resistance to the Holocaust that has been preserved in official documents and by oral tradition; reflect on the responsibilities of individuals when confronted with social policies that violate human rights; consider the significance of the Holocaust in society today.
  • Life on the Great Plains
    In this four-part lesson, students examine the concept of geographic region by exploring the history of the Great Plains. Learning objectives include: to explore the concept of region and learn how culture and experience influence the perception of regions; to investigate the relationships between physical geography and human systems of culture and settlement; to trace the history and character of a region as reflected in literature and art; to examine factors that influenced westward expansion in the United States.
  • Live From Antiquity!
    Ancient languages are the deepest root of the humanities, drawing life from that distant time when the study of history, philosophy, literature, and of language itself began. The goals of this lesson plan are to gain an appreciation for Greek drama through study of a play by Sophocles; to explore the cultural and historical context of Greek drama and its role in Greek society; to reconstruct the experience of seeing a Greek drama performed and share that experience in an imaginative report.
  • Mark Twain and American Humor
    In this three-part lesson, students examine structure and characterization in the short story and consider the significance of humor through a study of Mark Twain's "The Notorious Jumping Frog of Calaveras County." Students will analyze the use of literary conventions and devices to develop character and point of view in the short story; investigate the purposes and significance of literary humor; and examine Mark Twain's storytelling style in relation to that of other American humorists.
  • Perspective on the Slave Narrative
    This lesson plan introduces students to one of the most widely-read genres of 19th-century American literature and an important influence within the African American literary tradition even today. The lesson focuses on the Narrative of William W. Brown, An American Slave (1847), which, along with the Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (1845), set the pattern for this genre and its combination of varied literary traditions and devices. To help students recognize the complex nature of the slave narrative, the lesson explores Brown's work from a variety of perspectives.
  • Practical Criticism
    Anthologists and editors prepare the way for poetry readers, selecting works that reward close reading and assisting interpretation through annotation. But on the Internet we can return to poetry in its native state--one set of words among many others competing for appreciation--and read with fresh eyes. The goals of this lesson plan, from EDSITEment, are to analyze the verbal devices through which poems make meaning; to compare one's personal interpretation of a poem with the personal interpretations of others; and to develop standards of literary judgment.
  • Recording the Changing Seasons in Ancient Times
    In this lesson, students learn about Stonehenge and read ancient myths and stories explaining the seasons. Acting as historians, the students use websites to find information about how ancient cultures kept track of and celebrated the seasons. This lesson is found on the Xpeditions website from National Geographic.
  • Shakespeare's Macbeth:Fear and the Motives of Evil
    This resource contains an EDSITEment lesson in which students will study Shakespeare's Macbeth. Students will use an Internet search engine to collect instances in the play of specific key words. Students will then organize and analyze the passages in which these key words appear for what they reveal about Macbeth's state of mind and the motives behind his increasing evil.
  • Tales of the Supernatural
    Monsters have haunted the literary imagination from earliest times (e.g., the Cyclops, Grendel, etc.), but a particular interest in horror and the Gothic form dates back to the 18th and early 19th century. The goals of this plan are to explore the origins and development of a literary genre; to investigate how shared imaginative concerns link the members of a literary period; to examine the evolution of a literary tradition; to compare works of literature from different eras.
  • Woman in Africa: Tradition and Change
    The goals of this lesson plan are: (1) To learn about the role of women in traditional African village life; (2) To understand the contextual nature of artwork within traditional African village life; (3) To become familiar with women writers of postcolonial Africa; (4) To examine how the traditions of village life influence postcolonial literature. could be used as a background lesson for figure sculpture.
  • You Kiss by the Book: Romeo & Juliet
    The goals of this lesson plan are: (1) To learn about Shakespeare's use of poetic conventions as a principle of dramatic structure in Romeo and Juliet; (2) To examine the first meeting between Romeo and Juliet as an enactment of figurative language in a context of competing poetic styles; (3) To explore the use of poetic forms to impart perspective in later episodes of the play; (4) To gain experience in close reading and the interpretation of verse structure and imagery.
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