Skip Navigation

Utah Core  •  Curriculum Search  •  All Social Studies Lesson Plans  •  USBE Social Studies website

 

Social Studies Curriculum
Social Studies - World Civilizations
Back to Previous Screen Back
Course Preface  
 

Core Curriculum for Social Studies

Last updated: 2002

Scope and Sequence | Philosophy | Overall Standards | Process Skills | Layout

Three Categories of Courses for Secondary Social Studies

Core Subjects

Grades 7-12: 4.5 Units Required

A required course which must be taken by all Students for graduation.

Core Subjects

Grades 7-12: Substitutions

May be taken for core credit in place of a core subject.

Core Electives

Grades 9-12:

Courses which fill remaining credit needs or interests.

Grade

Course

Credit

Grade

Course

Credit

Grade

Course

Credit

7

Utah Studies

0.5

7

Utah Studies-Honors

0.5

9-12

World Civilizations-II

0.5

8

U.S. History

1.0

8

U.S. History-Honors

1.0

11-12

Am. Government & Law

0.5

*9-12

Geography for Life

0.5

*9-12

Geography for Life-Honors

0.5

11-12

Anthropology

0.5

9-12

World Civilizations

0.5

9-12

World Civilizations-Honors

0.5

11-12

A.P. Am. Government & Law

0.5

10-12

U.S. History II

1.0

11-12

U.S. Government & Citizenship

0.5

11-12

A.P. Economics-Macro

0.5

 

11-12

A.P. American History

1.0

11-12

A.P. Economics-Micro

0.5

11-12

A.P. European History

1.0

11-12

A.P. Psychology

1.0

11-12

Advanced Geography

1.0

11-12

Economics

0.5

*It is recommended that Geography be a full-year course.

9-12

Geography II

0.5

11-12

Sociology

0.5

11-12

Psychology

0.5

+11-12

Other Electives

0.5

+Other Electives

Courses which may be offered, if approved by principals and district administrators. All courses must have a written scope, sequence, standards, objectives, and syllabus to be considered by the district.

UTAH STATE SOCIAL STUDIES PHILOSOPHY

PHILOSOPHY The primary purpose of social studies in Utah is to develop in young people understanding and appreciation of the social sciences in order to help them make informed and reasoned decisions for the public good. As citizens of a democratic society in a culturally diverse and interdependent world, young people need to be able to examine complex issues. Students are expected to become active, responsible, concerned, and knowledgeable citizens.

BASIC COMPONENTS To achieve this purpose, the social studies program in the State of Utah requires the acquisition of:

  • A social studies knowledge base.
  • The process skills necessary to analyze and apply that knowledge base.
  • The attitudes and attributes necessary to analyze and apply that knowledge base.

SOCIAL SCIENCE KNOWLEDGE BASE The knowledge base for the social studies is a coordinated and systematic study of anthropology, economics, geography, history, political science, psychology, and sociology. The social studies also include, but are not limited to, participatory citizenship and studies in character education, global and multicultural studies, law-related education, career education and free enterprise education. The social studies also seek to integrate content from language arts, foreign languages, philosophy, mathematics, the humanities, technology, and the natural and physical sciences.

SOCIAL SCIENCE PROCESS SKILLS The process skills necessary in social studies include creative/productive thinking, problem solving, critical thinking, inquiry, conflict resolution, metacognition, research and presentation, and cooperation and participation--from the point of view of social scientists.

ATTITUDES AND ATTRIBUTES The attitudes and attributes to be developed through social studies education emphasize respect of self and other individuals, commonality, diversity, democratic principles, and local and global community participation.

ESTABLISHING ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES Students have the prime responsibility for their own educational success. Social studies learning requires the combined efforts of students, parents, teachers, and administrators. Teachers are the guides who provide direction for learning in the class setting. The role of administrators is to promote an environment where the best learning and teaching can take place. Parents are encouraged to supplement classroom learning.

Students have responsibility for their own learning. In order to use the social studies to understand and participate responsibly in their world students will:

  • Demonstrate geographic, historical, economic, civic, social and cultural literacy.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the structure and function of political, social, and economic systems.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the relationship among the activities of people to their ideas, place, time, and history.
  • Recognize and apply democratic and constitutional principles, including freedom, equality, justice, and responsibility, to individual and community.
  • Interact appropriately and work cooperatively with people as a demonstration of respect for themselves and others.
  • Demonstrate responsibility to people, and the environment, as an essential component of character development and human survival.
  • Participate in activities which serve others and promote the public good.

Teachers have a responsibility to create an environment which is conducive to learning for all students. Teachers will:

  • Offer an authentic, active, integrated, meaningful, and in depth social studies curriculum.
  • Provide opportunities for students to learn and practice social studies process skills.
  • Emphasize creative and critical thinking as well as knowledge and comprehension.
  • Help students make relevant connections to other curricular areas.

Administrators have a responsibility to promote an environment which is conducive to learning. Administrators will strive to:

  • Support implementation of the social studies Core Curriculum.
  • Provide a safe, orderly learning environment.
  • Provide relevant inservice opportunities for teachers.

Parents have a responsibility to create an environment in the home which is conducive to learning. Parents, as partners in the learning process, are encouraged to:

  • Promote student involvement in classroom and school activities.
  • Be informed and supportive of school requirements.
  • Encourage discussion of social science issues.
  • Take time to listen, and to review school activities on a regular basis.

Standards & Objectives 1996

The chart below provides an overview of the Standards and Objectives which are used as a framework for all social studies subjects and grade levels. Geography For Life, is organized around five themes and six elements of geography in grades K-12. All courses will involve some degree of study in each of the social studies fields during the course of a school year. The emphasis will be driven by the title and course description for each class.

In the course listings which follow, readers will find in detail these standards and objectives with minor variances, along with suggested examples demonstrating ways in which each concept may be taught (see the introductory page, How to Read the Utah State Social Studies Core).

100 Process Skills

Students will demonstrate through individual and group processes a variety of creative, critical, causal, interpretive, and reflective thinking skills through observing, reading, writing, listening, speaking, and problem solving.

  • 101. Develop observations skills to foster inquiry in social studies.
  • 102. Develop writing skills in social studies.
  • 103. Develop speaking skills in social studies.
  • 104. Develop listening skills in social studies.
  • 105. Develop causal reasoning skills in social studies.
  • 106. Develop critical analysis skills in social studies.
  • 107. Develop interpretive skills in social studies.
  • 108. Develop creative thinking skills in social studies.

200 Geography

Students will demonstrate a comprehensive geographical view of the human and physical worlds and why they influence and relate to the environment, societies, and to global interconnectedness and interdependence.

  • 201. Develop map and globe skills of space and place.
  • 202. Develop and evaluate alternative uses of environments and resources.
  • 203. Demonstrate local, regional, national, and international connections.

300 History

Students will demonstrate why and how ideas, attitudes, events, persons, movements, and documents have influenced humanity.

  • 301. Compare and contrast the interpretations of historical events over time.
  • 302. Identify and describe selected periods or movements of historical change within and across cultures.
  • 303. Analyze social issues using appropriate historical methodology.

400 Political Science

Students will demonstrate why people in different societies create and adopt systems of government, and how each addresses human needs, rights, and citizen responsibilities.

  • 401. Identify and examine ongoing issues involving the rights, roles, and status of the individual in relation to the general welfare.
  • 402. Compare and contrast various political systems.
  • 403. Compare and contrast the ways societies and organizations respond to conflicts between forces of unity and forces of diversity.

500 Culture (Anthropology, Sociology, Psychology)

Students will demonstrate why and how commonalties and differences of ideas, attitudes, choices, and technologies influence the interaction and behavior of individuals, groups, institutions, and cultures.

  • 501. Apply an understanding of culture as an integrated whole that relates to traditions, behavior patterns, and material culture.
  • 502. Identify and describe both current and historic examples of the interaction and interdependence of individuals and societies in a variety of cultural settings.
  • 503. Explain why individuals, groups, and institutions respond to change in a particular way on the basis of shared assumptions and technologies.
  • 504. Describe the various forms and roles institutions take in furthering both continuity and change.

600 Economics

Students will demonstrate why societies organize available resources for the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services.

  • 601. Explain how scarcity of resources (natural, human, and capital goods) requires the development of economic systems to make basic decisions about how goods and services are produced and distributed.
  • 602. Compare and contrast the various economic institutions that comprise economic systems; e.g., households, business firms, banks, government agencies, labor unions, corporations.
  • 603. Apply economic concepts and economic reasoning to historical and contemporary social developments and issues.

700 Life Skills

Students will demonstrate why and how lifelong learning, collaboration, and responsible citizenship are necessary to promote the personal and public good.

  • 701. Show through personal actions the ability to contribute to the community.
  • 702. Demonstrate collaboration in working with others to achieve specified results.
  • 703. Demonstrate an understanding of, and a reasoned commitment to, the rule of law.

Process Skills 1996

PROCESS SKILLS Process skills are as important a part of student education as content. They must be constantly taught, practiced, and applied in order for students to function effectively in an increasingly complex world. The process skills listed below are important in social studies education.

COMMUNICATING Interpreting, analyzing, and responding to information, people, and situations as writers, readers, speakers, listeners, and participants

CREATIVE/PRODUCTIVE THINKING Using fluency, elaboration, webbing, flexibility, brainstorming, details of "piggybacking"; encouraging originality; elaborating details of figurative and semantic expression; encouraging intuitive and affective responses

PROBLEM SOLVING Identifying problems; planning; developing alternatives; deciding; forecasting/predicting; creating solutions; promoting acceptance

CRITICAL THINKING Identifying cause and effect; comparing and contrasting; inferring; differentiating between fact and opinion, reality and fantasy; understanding persuasive techniques and propaganda; generalizing; clarifying; recognizing exaggeration and probability

INQUIRY Questioning; identifying problems; comparing relationships; interpreting; hypothesizing; drawing conclusions

CONFLICT RESOLUTION Identifying goals and multiple points of view; respecting differences; developing options; sharing ownership; creating and monitoring an agreement; negotiating, mediating, or resolving disputes

METACOGNITION Reflecting on personal thinking; evaluating cognitive and problem- solving strategies; developing study and test-taking strategies; learning mnemonic (memorization) strategies

RESEARCH AND PRESENTATION Collecting; observing; interviewing; synthesizing; evaluating; summarizing; utilizing primary and secondary sources; organizing, interpreting, graphing, charting, mapping, reporting, presenting information utilizing technology as appropriate

COOPERATION AND SOCIAL PARTICIPATION Caring; serving; participating; socializing; developing leadership; valuing and respecting self and others; valuing similarities and differences in self and others; respecting property and the rights of others; showing a humane respect for all living things; respecting the rule of law

How to Read the Utah State Social Studies Core

The Utah State Social Studies Core is divided by subject area, and by courses which are required for graduation and those which are elective. Each course is then described by a series of numbers, titles, and prerequisites.

A course description is provided which outlines in general terms the scope and sequence of the course, as well as areas of focus within the subject matter. Both scope and sequence are outlined in the description.

Each course is divided into seven standards, which are identical for all courses, grades seven through twelve. The standards outline the broad themes and focuses which are to be addressed in the course. Following each standard are a series of objectives taken from the points of the standard. Teachers are to design their courses around these guidelines, and are free to add additional concepts as time and expertise permit.

Standards create a broad framework for developing concepts in the course.

Objectives are built from concepts and themes found in the standard.

Examples are a new tie to the state Core. They are designed only as suggested ways in which the objective could be met. It is not intended that each example will be required as a lesson concept.

This information creates continuity of instruction for all grade levels.


UEN logo http://www.uen.org - in partnership with Utah State Board of Education (USBE) and Utah System of Higher Education (USHE).  Send questions or comments to USBE Specialist - Robert Austin and see the Social Studies website. For general questions about Utah's Core Standards contact the Director - DIANA SUDDRETH .  
Email:  diana.suddreth@schools.utah.gov
These materials have been produced by and for the teachers of the State of Utah. Copies of these materials may be freely reproduced for teacher and classroom use. When distributing these materials, credit should be given to Utah State Board of Education. These materials may not be published, in whole or part, or in any other format, without the written permission of the Utah State Board of Education, 250 East 500 South, PO Box 144200, Salt Lake City, Utah 84114-4200.
© Utah Education Network in partnership with the Utah State Board of Education and Higher Ed Utah.
UEN does not endorse and is not responsible for content on external websites linked to from this page.
(800) 866-5852     |     KUEN CPB Compliance    |     Web Accessibility     |     Captioning