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Bully Blocker

Curriculum Tie:

Time Frame:
1 class period that runs 45 minutes.

Group Size:
Large Groups


 

Summary:
Students will recognize why acceptance of self and others is important for the development of positive attitudes. Students will explore how relationships can contribute to self-worth and demonstrate qualities that help form healthy interpersonal relationships.

Main Curriculum Tie:
Health Education - 5th Grade
Standard 3 Objective 1

Demonstrate qualities that help form healthy interpersonal relationships.

Materials:
Copies

Materials

  • Two or more balled-up pieces of paper. Wrap masking tape around the paper to hold the shape. A soft ball could also be used.
  • “Block-A-Bully” video (included on the Prevention Dimensions Foundation CD)

Music

  • “Take a Stand” from the CD Take a Stand
  • “The Heat is On” from the CD Be a Builder

Vocabulary

  • bully
  • bullying
  • vulnerable
  • bodyguard

Attachments

Background For Teachers:
Lesson at a Glance

Introduction
1. Block-a-Bully video

Strategy
2. Bodyguard Game

Conclusion
3. Block-a-Bully Review
4. Block-a-Bully Follow-Up

Home Connection
5. Being a Bodyguard

Instructional Procedures:

  1. Block-a-Bully Download

    Show the Block-a-Bully video available to download for free through iTunes. Go to the iTunes store and search for “Utah Electronic High School Block a Bully.”

    First pose the statements featured in the video and have students create their own illustrations.
    Some teachers assign this to tables and use the art to create a bulletin board.

    • Bullying is behavior that is intended to cause harm or distress.
    • Behavior that exists in a relationship in which there is an imbalance of power.
    • This behavior may be repeated over time.
    • Bullying can come from a boy or a girl or a group.
    • Bullies can use mean words.
    • Bullies can be physical.
    • Bullying can be leaving someone out.
    • I have a right to be in an environment where I feel safe.
    • I have a responsibility to treat others with kindness.
    • Violence is intent, by words, looks, signs, or acts, to hurt someone else’s body, feelings, or possessions.
    • What is one thing you learned about bullies that you didn’t know before?
    • What are some things that cause distress or injury in the classroom and/ or on the playground?
      throwing spit wads; laughing at a person because he/she couldn’t hit the ball; stealing a pencil; laughing at someone’s grade; writing a name on the restroom wall; picking on a vulnerable student; kicking a vending machine; leaving garbage on the playground; bullying; teasing
    • What questions do you have about bullying?

  2. Bodyguard

    With one soft ball or balled-up piece of paper, play the game “Bodyguard.”

    • Form circles of 10–15 students.
    • Two students stand in the middle of the circle.
    • One is labeled “B.” The other is labeled “V.” “B” is designated the protector or bodyguard of “V” or “victim.”
    • The students in the circle throw one soft ball or balled up piece of paper and attempt to hit the student being guarded.
    • Only hits below the elbow count.
    • “B” attempts to protect “V” from all contact with the ball.
    • The person who throws the ball and hits “V” becomes the new “V” and old “V” becomes the new bodyguard. The “B” person joins the circle.
    • Play until all members of the circle have had a chance to be in the middle.
    • During the game, what did you learn about the traits of a bodyguard?.
    • How is a bodyguard like the mediator who helps us take care of our rocks?
    • What makes an effective bodyguard?
    • How did the bodyguard protect the special person?
    • What was it like being a bodyguard?
    • What was it like being a special person?
    • What did the bodyguard give up to offer protection?
    • How did the special person assist in his/her own protection?
    • Whom do we protect?
    • Why do people try to pick on or bully others?
    • What do we protect?
    • How do we become bodyguards for ourselves? Others? The environment?
    • How would it be easier if there were more than one bodyguard?
    • How can we work together to protect each other?
    • How do the 3 Cs tie into this discussion?

      Discussion: Another word for bodyguard is "ally." An ally is:

      • someone who sticks up for you.
      • takes a stand against bullying.
      • helps you when you need it most.
    • What will you do the next time you see someone who needs a bodyguard or ally?
    • What will you do with your fear?
    • How will we all work together to protect ourselves, each other, and the environment?

  3. Block-a-Bully Review

    Watch the Block-a-Bully video again.

    • Have each student draw himself or herself into the given situation as a bodyguard.
    • This can be done in students’ individual drawings or as a whole-class activity.
    • Encourage the students to use captions or thought bubbles in their drawings that explain their role as a bodyguard.
    • Make a bulletin board of the artwork.

  4. Block-a-Bully Follow-Up
    • Have students report how they have been a bodyguard or how they have been protected.
    • Recognize students throughout the year who have acted as bodyguards to themselves, others, or the environment.

  5. Being a Bodyguard
    • Make a copy of the Home Connection for each student.
    • Take a short amount of class time to explain the home assignment.
    • Send the Home Connection paper home with each student and instruct students to share the information with their families.

Bibliography:
This lesson is part of the Utah State Board of Education Prevention Dimensions program.

Author:
Utah LessonPlans

Created Date :
Jan 26 2017 10:50 AM

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