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Main Street Wyoming

A popular original series focusing on the communities and people of Wyoming, "Main Street, Wyoming" allows the audience to not only gain a better appreciation for the wonders of Wyoming but also take a second look at the events changing the world around us from the perspective of other Wyomingites.

  • Photography of Sara Wiles
    Saturday, June 27
    6:30 am on FNX 9.3
    Sara Wiles began taking pictures of Northern Arapaho people as a social worker on the Wind River Reservation. The photos were a chronicle and a gift to Indian families; now they tour art galleries and museums across the country. Wiles retains her close ties to reservation friends and families, even as she breaks new ground in her effort to use photographs to tell the stories of people and cultures
  • Photography of Sara Wiles
    Monday, July 6
    5:30 am on FNX 9.3
    Sara Wiles began taking pictures of Northern Arapaho people as a social worker on the Wind River Reservation. The photos were a chronicle and a gift to Indian families; now they tour art galleries and museums across the country. Wiles retains her close ties to reservation friends and families, even as she breaks new ground in her effort to use photographs to tell the stories of people and cultures
  • The Mystery of the Horse Creek Girl
    Monday, July 13
    5:30 am on FNX 9.3
    Fifty years after Horse Creek Girl's remains were found, a seemingly simple tribal identification project blossomed into a complex, multi-discipline study. As a result, we now have an idea of how the Horse Creek Girl may have lived and died, and we get a different look at early reservation history than we may be accustomed to.

 

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  • Photography of Sara Wiles
    Saturday, May 23
    6:33 am on FNX 9.3
    Sara Wiles began taking pictures of Northern Arapaho people as a social worker on the Wind River Reservation. The photos were a chronicle and a gift to Indian families; now they tour art galleries and museums across the country. Wiles retains her close ties to reservation friends and families, even as she breaks new ground in her effort to use photographs to tell the stories of people and cultures
  • Photography of Sara Wiles
    Saturday, May 23
    12:33 am on FNX 9.3
    Sara Wiles began taking pictures of Northern Arapaho people as a social worker on the Wind River Reservation. The photos were a chronicle and a gift to Indian families; now they tour art galleries and museums across the country. Wiles retains her close ties to reservation friends and families, even as she breaks new ground in her effort to use photographs to tell the stories of people and cultures
  • The Mystery of the Horse Creek Girl
    Monday, May 18
    6:30 am on FNX 9.3
    Fifty years after Horse Creek Girl's remains were found, a seemingly simple tribal identification project blossomed into a complex, multi-discipline study. As a result, we now have an idea of how the Horse Creek Girl may have lived and died, and we get a different look at early reservation history than we may be accustomed to.
  • The Mystery of the Horse Creek Girl
    Thursday, April 16
    1:30 pm on FNX 9.3
    Fifty years after Horse Creek Girl's remains were found, a seemingly simple tribal identification project blossomed into a complex, multi-discipline study. As a result, we now have an idea of how the Horse Creek Girl may have lived and died, and we get a different look at early reservation history than we may be accustomed to.
  • The Mystery of the Horse Creek Girl
    Wednesday, April 15
    6:30 pm on FNX 9.3
    Fifty years after Horse Creek Girl's remains were found, a seemingly simple tribal identification project blossomed into a complex, multi-discipline study. As a result, we now have an idea of how the Horse Creek Girl may have lived and died, and we get a different look at early reservation history than we may be accustomed to.
  • Photography of Sara Wiles
    Monday, April 6
    5:30 am on FNX 9.3
    Sara Wiles began taking pictures of Northern Arapaho people as a social worker on the Wind River Reservation. The photos were a chronicle and a gift to Indian families; now they tour art galleries and museums across the country. Wiles retains her close ties to reservation friends and families, even as she breaks new ground in her effort to use photographs to tell the stories of people and cultures