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Indian Country Today

Indian Country Today delivers daily news and analysis about Native America and global Indigenous communities. Stories are reported from bureaus in Phoenix, Washington D.C. and Anchorage. The host is Patty Talahongva.

  • Wednesday, October 27
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  • Friday, December 10
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  • Friday, December 10
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  • Monday, December 13
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  • Wednesday, December 15
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  • Wednesday, December 15
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  • Monday, December 20
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  • Tuesday, December 21
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  • Tuesday, December 21
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  • Tuesday, December 21
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  • Wednesday, December 22
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  • Wednesday, December 22
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  • Thursday, December 23
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  • Thursday, December 23
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  • Friday, December 24
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  • Friday, December 24
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  • Monday, December 27
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  • Monday, December 27
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
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  • Monday, December 27
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
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  • Tuesday, December 28
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  • Wednesday, December 29
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
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  • Thursday, December 30
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  • Friday, December 31
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  • Wednesday, October 27
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    No description available.
  • Wednesday, October 27
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    No description available.
  • Tuesday, October 26
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    No description available.
  • Indigenous Leaders Leading The Future
    Tuesday, October 26
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Minnesota Lt. Gov. Peggy Flanagan, White Earth Band of Ojibwe, was elected as in 2018. She is only the second Native woman to be elected to a statewide executive office, after Denise Juneau. She joins us to talk reelection and her plans for the future. Holly Cook Macarro is a partner with Spirt Rock Consulting and a regular contributor to ICT's news program. Indian Country recently lost a lot three incredible leaders: Ed Driving Hawk, Leon Cook and Earl Old Person.
  • Indigenous Leaders Leading The Future
    Tuesday, October 26
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    Minnesota Lt. Gov. Peggy Flanagan, White Earth Band of Ojibwe, was elected as in 2018. She is only the second Native woman to be elected to a statewide executive office, after Denise Juneau. She joins us to talk reelection and her plans for the future. Holly Cook Macarro is a partner with Spirt Rock Consulting and a regular contributor to ICT's news program. Indian Country recently lost a lot three incredible leaders: Ed Driving Hawk, Leon Cook and Earl Old Person.
  • Indigenous Leaders Leading The Future
    Monday, October 25
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Minnesota Lt. Gov. Peggy Flanagan, White Earth Band of Ojibwe, was elected as in 2018. She is only the second Native woman to be elected to a statewide executive office, after Denise Juneau. She joins us to talk reelection and her plans for the future. Holly Cook Macarro is a partner with Spirt Rock Consulting and a regular contributor to ICT's news program. Indian Country recently lost a lot three incredible leaders: Ed Driving Hawk, Leon Cook and Earl Old Person.
  • Health and Hardcore Rock 'n' Roll
    Monday, October 25
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    MIGIZI Communications has been a pillar of the Minneapolis Urban Indian community since 1977. Through the decades it has served thousands of youth with opportunities to advance their knowledge in the media and beyond. Kelly Drummer joins us. She's Oglala, and MIGIZI's executive director. Robin Butterfield, Ho-Chunk, former chair of the National Indian Education Association, also joins us. One of the resolutions passed at the recent convention addresses critical race theory. David Wilson, Navajo, is the first director of the Tribal Health Research Office at the National Institutes of Health. Since 2017, he has addressed tribal leaders about their concerns. He also teaches at the Center for American Indian Health at John Hopkins University. October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month. And this week, the American Indian Cancer Foundation celebrated Indigenous Pink. Its CEO Melissa Buffalo, Meskwaki, joins us. Stevie Salas, Apache, was a boy growing up in Oceanside, California, dreaming of becoming a rock and roll musician. In the late 1980s he made his dream come true. We learn about his storied career.
  • Health and Hardcore Rock 'n' Roll
    Monday, October 25
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    MIGIZI Communications has been a pillar of the Minneapolis Urban Indian community since 1977. Through the decades it has served thousands of youth with opportunities to advance their knowledge in the media and beyond. Kelly Drummer joins us. She's Oglala, and MIGIZI's executive director. Robin Butterfield, Ho-Chunk, former chair of the National Indian Education Association, also joins us. One of the resolutions passed at the recent convention addresses critical race theory. David Wilson, Navajo, is the first director of the Tribal Health Research Office at the National Institutes of Health. Since 2017, he has addressed tribal leaders about their concerns. He also teaches at the Center for American Indian Health at John Hopkins University. October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month. And this week, the American Indian Cancer Foundation celebrated Indigenous Pink. Its CEO Melissa Buffalo, Meskwaki, joins us. Stevie Salas, Apache, was a boy growing up in Oceanside, California, dreaming of becoming a rock and roll musician. In the late 1980s he made his dream come true. We learn about his storied career.
  • Health and Hardcore Rock 'n' Roll
    Friday, October 22
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    MIGIZI Communications has been a pillar of the Minneapolis Urban Indian community since 1977. Through the decades it has served thousands of youth with opportunities to advance their knowledge in the media and beyond. Kelly Drummer joins us. She's Oglala, and MIGIZI's executive director. Robin Butterfield, Ho-Chunk, former chair of the National Indian Education Association, also joins us. One of the resolutions passed at the recent convention addresses critical race theory. David Wilson, Navajo, is the first director of the Tribal Health Research Office at the National Institutes of Health. Since 2017, he has addressed tribal leaders about their concerns. He also teaches at the Center for American Indian Health at John Hopkins University. October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month. And this week, the American Indian Cancer Foundation celebrated Indigenous Pink. Its CEO Melissa Buffalo, Meskwaki, joins us. Stevie Salas, Apache, was a boy growing up in Oceanside, California, dreaming of becoming a rock and roll musician. In the late 1980s he made his dream come true. We learn about his storied career.
  • Shawls In Shades of Pink
    Friday, October 22
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death for Native women. Meskwaki citizen Melissa Buffalo is the CEO of the American Indian Cancer Foundation. She joins us today to tell us about "Indigenous Pink Day," a day aimed at bring awareness to the disease for Native people. The National Park Service is more than 100 years old and it's never been led by an Indigenous person, but that may soon change. The federal agency oversees more than 85 million acres of national parks, monuments, battlefields and recreation areas across the U.S. ICT and Underscore reporter Chris Aadland has more on Charles Sams III, who has been nominated to be the next director of the National Park Service.
  • Shawls In Shades of Pink
    Friday, October 22
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death for Native women. Meskwaki citizen Melissa Buffalo is the CEO of the American Indian Cancer Foundation. She joins us today to tell us about "Indigenous Pink Day," a day aimed at bring awareness to the disease for Native people. The National Park Service is more than 100 years old and it's never been led by an Indigenous person, but that may soon change. The federal agency oversees more than 85 million acres of national parks, monuments, battlefields and recreation areas across the U.S. ICT and Underscore reporter Chris Aadland has more on Charles Sams III, who has been nominated to be the next director of the National Park Service.
  • Shawls In Shades of Pink
    Thursday, October 21
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death for Native women. Meskwaki citizen Melissa Buffalo is the CEO of the American Indian Cancer Foundation. She joins us today to tell us about "Indigenous Pink Day," a day aimed at bring awareness to the disease for Native people. The National Park Service is more than 100 years old and it's never been led by an Indigenous person, but that may soon change. The federal agency oversees more than 85 million acres of national parks, monuments, battlefields and recreation areas across the U.S. ICT and Underscore reporter Chris Aadland has more on Charles Sams III, who has been nominated to be the next director of the National Park Service.
  • Reaching Native Communities In Covid-19 Research
    Thursday, October 21
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    David Wilson, Navajo, was named the first director of the Tribal Health Research Office at the National Institute of Health in 2017. He leads health research about Native people, and has a current research budget of $130 million. Wilson has collaborated with top experts, including Dr. Anthony Fauci, to ensure Native communities are including in pandemic research. He tells us more about COVID-19, vaccines and other areas of data collection. The National Indian Education Association held its in-person convention last weekend. About 800 people gathered in Omaha, Nebraska. Robin Butterfield, a longtime educator and ombudsman of the organization, joins us. ICT's Shirley Sneve covered the event and tells us more too.
  • Reaching Native Communities In Covid-19 Research
    Thursday, October 21
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    David Wilson, Navajo, was named the first director of the Tribal Health Research Office at the National Institute of Health in 2017. He leads health research about Native people, and has a current research budget of $130 million. Wilson has collaborated with top experts, including Dr. Anthony Fauci, to ensure Native communities are including in pandemic research. He tells us more about COVID-19, vaccines and other areas of data collection. The National Indian Education Association held its in-person convention last weekend. About 800 people gathered in Omaha, Nebraska. Robin Butterfield, a longtime educator and ombudsman of the organization, joins us. ICT's Shirley Sneve covered the event and tells us more too.
  • Reaching Native Communities In Covid-19 Research
    Wednesday, October 20
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    David Wilson, Navajo, was named the first director of the Tribal Health Research Office at the National Institute of Health in 2017. He leads health research about Native people, and has a current research budget of $130 million. Wilson has collaborated with top experts, including Dr. Anthony Fauci, to ensure Native communities are including in pandemic research. He tells us more about COVID-19, vaccines and other areas of data collection. The National Indian Education Association held its in-person convention last weekend. About 800 people gathered in Omaha, Nebraska. Robin Butterfield, a longtime educator and ombudsman of the organization, joins us. ICT's Shirley Sneve covered the event and tells us more too.
  • The Rest Is Rock N' Roll History
    Wednesday, October 20
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Stevie Salas is a rock and roll musician. In the late 1980s, George Clinton signed Salas, Apache, to play on his next album and the rest is history. Salas has played on more than 70 albums and has sold 2 million records. He has played with such legends as Rod Stewart, Mick Jagger and Justin Timberlake. Previously Salas has been named one of the Top 50 Guitarists of all time by the magazine "Guitar Playing." The fall sports season is in full swing. Brent Cahwee, Pawnee and Euchee, is the co-founder of NDNSPORTS. He tells us about the Native athletes playing volleyball, football and running cross country this season.
  • The Rest Is Rock N' Roll History
    Wednesday, October 20
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    Stevie Salas is a rock and roll musician. In the late 1980s, George Clinton signed Salas, Apache, to play on his next album and the rest is history. Salas has played on more than 70 albums and has sold 2 million records. He has played with such legends as Rod Stewart, Mick Jagger and Justin Timberlake. Previously Salas has been named one of the Top 50 Guitarists of all time by the magazine "Guitar Playing." The fall sports season is in full swing. Brent Cahwee, Pawnee and Euchee, is the co-founder of NDNSPORTS. He tells us about the Native athletes playing volleyball, football and running cross country this season.
  • The Rest Is Rock N' Roll History
    Tuesday, October 19
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Stevie Salas is a rock and roll musician. In the late 1980s, George Clinton signed Salas, Apache, to play on his next album and the rest is history. Salas has played on more than 70 albums and has sold 2 million records. He has played with such legends as Rod Stewart, Mick Jagger and Justin Timberlake. Previously Salas has been named one of the Top 50 Guitarists of all time by the magazine "Guitar Playing." The fall sports season is in full swing. Brent Cahwee, Pawnee and Euchee, is the co-founder of NDNSPORTS. He tells us about the Native athletes playing volleyball, football and running cross country this season.
  • Youth & Elders: Learning from Each Other
    Tuesday, October 19
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    MIGIZI Communications has served the Minneapolis urban Native community since 1977. Through the decades it has served thousands of youth with opportunities to advance their knowledge in the media and beyond. Last year, MIGIZI's building caught on fire during the civil unrest following the death of George Floyd. Executive Director Kelly Drummer, Oglala Lakota, says the organization is "healing" with a rebuild. The Elders and Youth Conference is an annual gathering hosted by the First Alaskan Institute. It started Sunday and is being held virtually for a second year in a row due to the pandemic. The elder keynote speaker is Ruth Booth. She is 84-years-old and is a part of the Metlakatla community. Booth is renowned for her ability to make traditional medicines. The youth keynote speaker is 15-year-old Oliver Tyrrell. He is a Yup'ik high school student in Anchorage, Alaska. Tyrrell is an outspoken advocate and member of the LGBTQ and trans community.
  • Youth & Elders: Learning from Each Other
    Tuesday, October 19
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    MIGIZI Communications has served the Minneapolis urban Native community since 1977. Through the decades it has served thousands of youth with opportunities to advance their knowledge in the media and beyond. Last year, MIGIZI's building caught on fire during the civil unrest following the death of George Floyd. Executive Director Kelly Drummer, Oglala Lakota, says the organization is "healing" with a rebuild. The Elders and Youth Conference is an annual gathering hosted by the First Alaskan Institute. It started Sunday and is being held virtually for a second year in a row due to the pandemic. The elder keynote speaker is Ruth Booth. She is 84-years-old and is a part of the Metlakatla community. Booth is renowned for her ability to make traditional medicines. The youth keynote speaker is 15-year-old Oliver Tyrrell. He is a Yup'ik high school student in Anchorage, Alaska. Tyrrell is an outspoken advocate and member of the LGBTQ and trans community.
  • Youth & Elders: Learning from Each Other
    Monday, October 18
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    MIGIZI Communications has served the Minneapolis urban Native community since 1977. Through the decades it has served thousands of youth with opportunities to advance their knowledge in the media and beyond. Last year, MIGIZI's building caught on fire during the civil unrest following the death of George Floyd. Executive Director Kelly Drummer, Oglala Lakota, says the organization is "healing" with a rebuild. The Elders and Youth Conference is an annual gathering hosted by the First Alaskan Institute. It started Sunday and is being held virtually for a second year in a row due to the pandemic. The elder keynote speaker is Ruth Booth. She is 84-years-old and is a part of the Metlakatla community. Booth is renowned for her ability to make traditional medicines. The youth keynote speaker is 15-year-old Oliver Tyrrell. He is a Yup'ik high school student in Anchorage, Alaska. Tyrrell is an outspoken advocate and member of the LGBTQ and trans community.
  • A Great Time to Be Indigenous
    Monday, October 18
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Ashley Callingbull, Plains Cree, has appeared in numerous television shows including "Blackstone," and the "Amazing Race Canada." She is a model, an actress, and an advocate. In 2015, she became the first Indigenous woman to win the title of Mrs. Universe. She joins us to talk about an upcoming television show and her soon-to-be book deal. Sequoyah was born in the 1770s and is credited with creating the Cherokee language syllabary. A new film takes viewers on a journey about his life and the legacy he's left behind. "Searching for Sequoyah" was written and produced by LeAnne Howe, Choctaw. It was co-produced and narrated by Joshua Nelson, Cherokee. Howe and Nelson join our newscast to tell us more. Hopi runner Kyle Sumatzkuku was one of a handful of Natives to compete in this year's Boston Marathon. He ran the marathon in 2 hours, 26 minutes and 17 seconds. That time earned him an impressive 48th place out of 15,000 runners. He joins us to tell us about his race, and what his future races may look like.
  • A Great Time to Be Indigenous
    Monday, October 18
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    Ashley Callingbull, Plains Cree, has appeared in numerous television shows including "Blackstone," and the "Amazing Race Canada." She is a model, an actress, and an advocate. In 2015, she became the first Indigenous woman to win the title of Mrs. Universe. She joins us to talk about an upcoming television show and her soon-to-be book deal. Sequoyah was born in the 1770s and is credited with creating the Cherokee language syllabary. A new film takes viewers on a journey about his life and the legacy he's left behind. "Searching for Sequoyah" was written and produced by LeAnne Howe, Choctaw. It was co-produced and narrated by Joshua Nelson, Cherokee. Howe and Nelson join our newscast to tell us more. Hopi runner Kyle Sumatzkuku was one of a handful of Natives to compete in this year's Boston Marathon. He ran the marathon in 2 hours, 26 minutes and 17 seconds. That time earned him an impressive 48th place out of 15,000 runners. He joins us to tell us about his race, and what his future races may look like.
  • A Great Time to Be Indigenous
    Friday, October 15
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Ashley Callingbull, Plains Cree, has appeared in numerous television shows including "Blackstone," and the "Amazing Race Canada." She is a model, an actress, and an advocate. In 2015, she became the first Indigenous woman to win the title of Mrs. Universe. She joins us to talk about an upcoming television show and her soon-to-be book deal. Sequoyah was born in the 1770s and is credited with creating the Cherokee language syllabary. A new film takes viewers on a journey about his life and the legacy he's left behind. "Searching for Sequoyah" was written and produced by LeAnne Howe, Choctaw. It was co-produced and narrated by Joshua Nelson, Cherokee. Howe and Nelson join our newscast to tell us more. Hopi runner Kyle Sumatzkuku was one of a handful of Natives to compete in this year's Boston Marathon. He ran the marathon in 2 hours, 26 minutes and 17 seconds. That time earned him an impressive 48th place out of 15,000 runners. He joins us to tell us about his race, and what his future races may look like.
  • How to Save A Life
    Friday, October 15
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    According to the National Institute of Justice, domestic violence disproportionately impacts Native Americans and Alaska Natives. More than 1.5 million Native women and 1.4 million Native men experience violence during their lifetime. Ojibwe citizen Lori Jump joins us today. She is the director of the StrongHearts Native Helpline. The helpline provides services to Native people impacted by domestic, dating and sexual violence. Hopi runner Kyle Sumatzkuku was one of a handful of Natives to compete in this year's Boston Marathon. He ran the marathon in 2 hours, 26 minutes and 17 seconds. That time earned him an impressive 48th place out of 15,000 runners. He joins us to tell us about his race, and what his future races may look like.
  • How to Save A Life
    Friday, October 15
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    According to the National Institute of Justice, domestic violence disproportionately impacts Native Americans and Alaska Natives. More than 1.5 million Native women and 1.4 million Native men experience violence during their lifetime. Ojibwe citizen Lori Jump joins us today. She is the director of the StrongHearts Native Helpline. The helpline provides services to Native people impacted by domestic, dating and sexual violence. Hopi runner Kyle Sumatzkuku was one of a handful of Natives to compete in this year's Boston Marathon. He ran the marathon in 2 hours, 26 minutes and 17 seconds. That time earned him an impressive 48th place out of 15,000 runners. He joins us to tell us about his race, and what his future races may look like.
  • How to Save A Life
    Thursday, October 14
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    According to the National Institute of Justice, domestic violence disproportionately impacts Native Americans and Alaska Natives. More than 1.5 million Native women and 1.4 million Native men experience violence during their lifetime. Ojibwe citizen Lori Jump joins us today. She is the director of the StrongHearts Native Helpline. The helpline provides services to Native people impacted by domestic, dating and sexual violence. Hopi runner Kyle Sumatzkuku was one of a handful of Natives to compete in this year's Boston Marathon. He ran the marathon in 2 hours, 26 minutes and 17 seconds. That time earned him an impressive 48th place out of 15,000 runners. He joins us to tell us about his race, and what his future races may look like.
  • Sequoyah: 'a Story About Triumph'
    Thursday, October 14
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Sequoyah was born in the 1770s and is credited with creating the Cherokee language syllabary. A new film takes viewers on a journey about his life and the legacy he's left behind. "Searching for Sequoyah" was written and produced by LeAnne Howe, Choctaw. It was co-produced and narrated by Joshua Nelson, Cherokee. Howe and Nelson join our newscast to tell us more. John Tahsuda III, Kiowa, is a regular contributor to Indian Country Today's newscast. In 2002, he worked as the staff director for the Senate Indian Affairs Committee. He also is a former principal deputy assistant secretary for Indian Affairs and served in that position from 2017 to 2020. Currently, he is a partner at Navigators Global, a company that provides political services to several industries including tribes.
  • Sequoyah: 'a Story About Triumph'
    Thursday, October 14
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    Sequoyah was born in the 1770s and is credited with creating the Cherokee language syllabary. A new film takes viewers on a journey about his life and the legacy he's left behind. "Searching for Sequoyah" was written and produced by LeAnne Howe, Choctaw. It was co-produced and narrated by Joshua Nelson, Cherokee. Howe and Nelson join our newscast to tell us more. John Tahsuda III, Kiowa, is a regular contributor to Indian Country Today's newscast. In 2002, he worked as the staff director for the Senate Indian Affairs Committee. He also is a former principal deputy assistant secretary for Indian Affairs and served in that position from 2017 to 2020. Currently, he is a partner at Navigators Global, a company that provides political services to several industries including tribes.
  • Sequoyah: 'a Story About Triumph'
    Wednesday, October 13
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Sequoyah was born in the 1770s and is credited with creating the Cherokee language syllabary. A new film takes viewers on a journey about his life and the legacy he's left behind. "Searching for Sequoyah" was written and produced by LeAnne Howe, Choctaw. It was co-produced and narrated by Joshua Nelson, Cherokee. Howe and Nelson join our newscast to tell us more. John Tahsuda III, Kiowa, is a regular contributor to Indian Country Today's newscast. In 2002, he worked as the staff director for the Senate Indian Affairs Committee. He also is a former principal deputy assistant secretary for Indian Affairs and served in that position from 2017 to 2020. Currently, he is a partner at Navigators Global, a company that provides political services to several industries including tribes.
  • Ashley Callingbull: 'live A Fearless Life'
    Wednesday, October 13
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Ashley Callingbull, Plains Cree, has appeared in numerous television shows including "Blackstone," and the "Amazing Race Canada." She is a model, an actress, and an advocate. In 2015, she became the first Indigenous woman to win the title of Mrs. Universe. She joins us now to talk about an upcoming television show and soon-to-be book deal. ICT reporter Meghan Sullivan is reporting about a $20 million Seacoast Trust fund from the Alaska Native corporation, "Sealaska." The organization is a decade-old network of individuals and organizations across the Southeast Alaska. It centers Indigenous led problem solving, and seeks to create a new type of conservation based on trust and healing.
  • Ashley Callingbull: 'live A Fearless Life'
    Wednesday, October 13
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    Ashley Callingbull, Plains Cree, has appeared in numerous television shows including "Blackstone," and the "Amazing Race Canada." She is a model, an actress, and an advocate. In 2015, she became the first Indigenous woman to win the title of Mrs. Universe. She joins us now to talk about an upcoming television show and soon-to-be book deal. ICT reporter Meghan Sullivan is reporting about a $20 million Seacoast Trust fund from the Alaska Native corporation, "Sealaska." The organization is a decade-old network of individuals and organizations across the Southeast Alaska. It centers Indigenous led problem solving, and seeks to create a new type of conservation based on trust and healing.
  • Ashley Callingbull: 'live A Fearless Life'
    Tuesday, October 12
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Ashley Callingbull, Plains Cree, has appeared in numerous television shows including "Blackstone," and the "Amazing Race Canada." She is a model, an actress, and an advocate. In 2015, she became the first Indigenous woman to win the title of Mrs. Universe. She joins us now to talk about an upcoming television show and soon-to-be book deal. ICT reporter Meghan Sullivan is reporting about a $20 million Seacoast Trust fund from the Alaska Native corporation, "Sealaska." The organization is a decade-old network of individuals and organizations across the Southeast Alaska. It centers Indigenous led problem solving, and seeks to create a new type of conservation based on trust and healing.
  • Everyday Is Indigenous Peoples' Day
    Tuesday, October 12
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    The first celebration of Columbus Day dates 1792 in New York, but Colorado was actually the first state to declare it a legal holiday in 1907. It wasn't until 1971 that Columbus Day, or the second Monday in October, was declared a federal holiday. This year, Oct. 11 is a day set aside to acknowledge the thousand of Indigenous people across the nation. President Joe Biden formalized this widely adopted idea by proclaiming the day Indigenous Peoples' Day. Tim Giago, founder of the Lakota Times and Indian Country Today, talks how Native American Day was founded in South Dakota. Filmmakers Bennie Klain and Leighton Peterson produced a piece called "Columbus Day Legacy" to tell the history of Italian and Native American citizens of Denver. Columbus Day was abolished in Colorado in 2020. It was replaced by Cabrini Day. It honors Frances Xavier Cabrini, the first American citizen to be recognized by the Catholic Church as a saint. Rick Waters is from the Denver Indian Center. Many cities across the country have adopted Indigenous Peoples Day including Phoenix. And 15 states also recognize today as Indigenous Peoples Day. Thanks for Watching!
  • Everyday Is Indigenous Peoples' Day
    Tuesday, October 12
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    The first celebration of Columbus Day dates 1792 in New York, but Colorado was actually the first state to declare it a legal holiday in 1907. It wasn't until 1971 that Columbus Day, or the second Monday in October, was declared a federal holiday. This year, Oct. 11 is a day set aside to acknowledge the thousand of Indigenous people across the nation. President Joe Biden formalized this widely adopted idea by proclaiming the day Indigenous Peoples' Day. Tim Giago, founder of the Lakota Times and Indian Country Today, talks how Native American Day was founded in South Dakota. Filmmakers Bennie Klain and Leighton Peterson produced a piece called "Columbus Day Legacy" to tell the history of Italian and Native American citizens of Denver. Columbus Day was abolished in Colorado in 2020. It was replaced by Cabrini Day. It honors Frances Xavier Cabrini, the first American citizen to be recognized by the Catholic Church as a saint. Rick Waters is from the Denver Indian Center. Many cities across the country have adopted Indigenous Peoples Day including Phoenix. And 15 states also recognize today as Indigenous Peoples Day. Thanks for Watching!
  • Everyday Is Indigenous Peoples' Day
    Monday, October 11
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    The first celebration of Columbus Day dates 1792 in New York, but Colorado was actually the first state to declare it a legal holiday in 1907. It wasn't until 1971 that Columbus Day, or the second Monday in October, was declared a federal holiday. This year, Oct. 11 is a day set aside to acknowledge the thousand of Indigenous people across the nation. President Joe Biden formalized this widely adopted idea by proclaiming the day Indigenous Peoples' Day. Tim Giago, founder of the Lakota Times and Indian Country Today, talks how Native American Day was founded in South Dakota. Filmmakers Bennie Klain and Leighton Peterson produced a piece called "Columbus Day Legacy" to tell the history of Italian and Native American citizens of Denver. Columbus Day was abolished in Colorado in 2020. It was replaced by Cabrini Day. It honors Frances Xavier Cabrini, the first American citizen to be recognized by the Catholic Church as a saint. Rick Waters is from the Denver Indian Center. Many cities across the country have adopted Indigenous Peoples Day including Phoenix. And 15 states also recognize today as Indigenous Peoples Day. Thanks for Watching!
  • Preparing for Our Future Generations
    Monday, October 11
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    The American Pops Orchestra will soon release a new episode of its PBS series "One Voice: The Songs We Share." This one will feature Sicangu Lakota hip-hop artist Frank Waln. The multi-genre artist will not only host the program, but he will perform two original songs. A state park that was known as Patrick's Point, named after a settler in the 1880s who is believed to have murdered Native people, has been renamed. The California State Parks and Recreation Commission voted unanimously to restore the park's Yurok name, Sue-Meg. Skip Lowry joins us. He is a community organizer who worked on this effort. It's already time to think about financial aid for next school year. Joining us from the Osage education department is Mary Wildcat and Lauren Redeagle. They explain the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, also known as FAFSA. The World Space Association is celebrating Space Week. Its theme is "Women in Space." We're joined by Racquel Redhouse who has worked at NASA for 18 years. She's held several titles over her time working at the nation's leading organization for space exploration.
  • Preparing for Our Future Generations
    Monday, October 11
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    The American Pops Orchestra will soon release a new episode of its PBS series "One Voice: The Songs We Share." This one will feature Sicangu Lakota hip-hop artist Frank Waln. The multi-genre artist will not only host the program, but he will perform two original songs. A state park that was known as Patrick's Point, named after a settler in the 1880s who is believed to have murdered Native people, has been renamed. The California State Parks and Recreation Commission voted unanimously to restore the park's Yurok name, Sue-Meg. Skip Lowry joins us. He is a community organizer who worked on this effort. It's already time to think about financial aid for next school year. Joining us from the Osage education department is Mary Wildcat and Lauren Redeagle. They explain the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, also known as FAFSA. The World Space Association is celebrating Space Week. Its theme is "Women in Space." We're joined by Racquel Redhouse who has worked at NASA for 18 years. She's held several titles over her time working at the nation's leading organization for space exploration.
  • Preparing for Our Future Generations
    Friday, October 8
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    The American Pops Orchestra will soon release a new episode of its PBS series "One Voice: The Songs We Share." This one will feature Sicangu Lakota hip-hop artist Frank Waln. The multi-genre artist will not only host the program, but he will perform two original songs. A state park that was known as Patrick's Point, named after a settler in the 1880s who is believed to have murdered Native people, has been renamed. The California State Parks and Recreation Commission voted unanimously to restore the park's Yurok name, Sue-Meg. Skip Lowry joins us. He is a community organizer who worked on this effort. It's already time to think about financial aid for next school year. Joining us from the Osage education department is Mary Wildcat and Lauren Redeagle. They explain the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, also known as FAFSA. The World Space Association is celebrating Space Week. Its theme is "Women in Space." We're joined by Racquel Redhouse who has worked at NASA for 18 years. She's held several titles over her time working at the nation's leading organization for space exploration.
  • In Tune with Frank Waln
    Friday, October 8
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    The American Pops Orchestra will soon release a new episode of its PBS series "One Voice: The Songs We Share." This one will feature Sicangu Lakota hip-hop artist Frank Waln. The multi-genre artist will not only host the program, but he will perform two original songs. It started out with bingo halls, then casinos. Contemporary Indian gaming is evolving once again with sports betting. ICT correspondent Carina Dominguez shares her reporting from tribal gaming enterprises in Connecticut, California and Arizona.
  • In Tune with Frank Waln
    Friday, October 8
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    The American Pops Orchestra will soon release a new episode of its PBS series "One Voice: The Songs We Share." This one will feature Sicangu Lakota hip-hop artist Frank Waln. The multi-genre artist will not only host the program, but he will perform two original songs. It started out with bingo halls, then casinos. Contemporary Indian gaming is evolving once again with sports betting. ICT correspondent Carina Dominguez shares her reporting from tribal gaming enterprises in Connecticut, California and Arizona.
  • In Tune with Frank Waln
    Thursday, October 7
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    The American Pops Orchestra will soon release a new episode of its PBS series "One Voice: The Songs We Share." This one will feature Sicangu Lakota hip-hop artist Frank Waln. The multi-genre artist will not only host the program, but he will perform two original songs. It started out with bingo halls, then casinos. Contemporary Indian gaming is evolving once again with sports betting. ICT correspondent Carina Dominguez shares her reporting from tribal gaming enterprises in Connecticut, California and Arizona.
  • Sue-Meg Name Restoration: A 'healing Effort'
    Thursday, October 7
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Skip Lowry is a Yurok descendant and community organizer. He worked on an initiative to restore the name of a California state park called Sue-Meg. It was previously named Patrick's Point. That name honored a homesteader who lived in the 1800s and is believed to have murdered Native people. Last week, the a California commission, voted unanimously to restore the park's name. It is located 300 miles north of Sacramento. Holly Cook Macarro, Red Lake Ojibwe, is a regular contributor to our show. She's a partner at Spirit Rock Consulting. Holly has worked for tribal nations for more than 20 years and she's a regular guest commentator on our program.
  • Sue-Meg Name Restoration: A 'healing Effort'
    Thursday, October 7
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    Skip Lowry is a Yurok descendant and community organizer. He worked on an initiative to restore the name of a California state park called Sue-Meg. It was previously named Patrick's Point. That name honored a homesteader who lived in the 1800s and is believed to have murdered Native people. Last week, the a California commission, voted unanimously to restore the park's name. It is located 300 miles north of Sacramento. Holly Cook Macarro, Red Lake Ojibwe, is a regular contributor to our show. She's a partner at Spirit Rock Consulting. Holly has worked for tribal nations for more than 20 years and she's a regular guest commentator on our program.
  • Sue-Meg Name Restoration: A 'healing Effort'
    Wednesday, October 6
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Skip Lowry is a Yurok descendant and community organizer. He worked on an initiative to restore the name of a California state park called Sue-Meg. It was previously named Patrick's Point. That name honored a homesteader who lived in the 1800s and is believed to have murdered Native people. Last week, the a California commission, voted unanimously to restore the park's name. It is located 300 miles north of Sacramento. Holly Cook Macarro, Red Lake Ojibwe, is a regular contributor to our show. She's a partner at Spirit Rock Consulting. Holly has worked for tribal nations for more than 20 years and she's a regular guest commentator on our program.
  • Indigenous Women at Nasa
    Wednesday, October 6
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    The World Space Association celebrate's "World Space Week." Raquel Redhouse is Dine and has worked at NASA for 18 years. She tells us about her work contributing to the upcoming Artemis mission. Its ultimate goal is to land the first woman and person of color on the moon. Plus, she tells us about her hope for more Natives to work at NASA. Shaun Griswold, Laguna Pueblo, is a reporter at Source NM. It is a newly established non-profit news organization based out of Albuquerque. On Sunday, he covered a rally bringing awareness to the epidemic of missing and murdered Indigenous people. He tells us about the stories of those impacted like Pepita Redhair and Shawna Toya.
  • Indigenous Women at Nasa
    Wednesday, October 6
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    The World Space Association celebrate's "World Space Week." Raquel Redhouse is Dine and has worked at NASA for 18 years. She tells us about her work contributing to the upcoming Artemis mission. Its ultimate goal is to land the first woman and person of color on the moon. Plus, she tells us about her hope for more Natives to work at NASA. Shaun Griswold, Laguna Pueblo, is a reporter at Source NM. It is a newly established non-profit news organization based out of Albuquerque. On Sunday, he covered a rally bringing awareness to the epidemic of missing and murdered Indigenous people. He tells us about the stories of those impacted like Pepita Redhair and Shawna Toya.
  • Indigenous Women at Nasa
    Tuesday, October 5
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    The World Space Association celebrate's "World Space Week." Raquel Redhouse is Dine and has worked at NASA for 18 years. She tells us about her work contributing to the upcoming Artemis mission. Its ultimate goal is to land the first woman and person of color on the moon. Plus, she tells us about her hope for more Natives to work at NASA. Shaun Griswold, Laguna Pueblo, is a reporter at Source NM. It is a newly established non-profit news organization based out of Albuquerque. On Sunday, he covered a rally bringing awareness to the epidemic of missing and murdered Indigenous people. He tells us about the stories of those impacted like Pepita Redhair and Shawna Toya.
  • Fafsa: Information You Should Know
    Tuesday, October 5
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Grants can be a helpful tool for future and current college students. The Free Application for Federal Student Aid - also known as FAFSA - opened on Oct. 1. Representatives Mary Wildcast and Lauren Redeagle from the Osage Education Department tell us important information about the application process. Indigenous athletes in the U.S. are strong competitors in sports like running and basketball but one young lady is turning heads on the volleyball court. Rainelle Jones is Peguis First Nation and was recently named the Big 10 Defensive Player of the Week. ICT freelancer Dan Ninham tells us more.
  • Fafsa: Information You Should Know
    Tuesday, October 5
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    Grants can be a helpful tool for future and current college students. The Free Application for Federal Student Aid - also known as FAFSA - opened on Oct. 1. Representatives Mary Wildcast and Lauren Redeagle from the Osage Education Department tell us important information about the application process. Indigenous athletes in the U.S. are strong competitors in sports like running and basketball but one young lady is turning heads on the volleyball court. Rainelle Jones is Peguis First Nation and was recently named the Big 10 Defensive Player of the Week. ICT freelancer Dan Ninham tells us more.
  • Fafsa: Information You Should Know
    Monday, October 4
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Grants can be a helpful tool for future and current college students. The Free Application for Federal Student Aid - also known as FAFSA - opened on Oct. 1. Representatives Mary Wildcast and Lauren Redeagle from the Osage Education Department tell us important information about the application process. Indigenous athletes in the U.S. are strong competitors in sports like running and basketball but one young lady is turning heads on the volleyball court. Rainelle Jones is Peguis First Nation and was recently named the Big 10 Defensive Player of the Week. ICT freelancer Dan Ninham tells us more.
  • The Art of Our Resiliency
    Monday, October 4
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    N. Bird Runningwater, Cheyenne and Mescalero Apache, spent 20 years at the Sundance Institute in the Indigenous film program and is leaving to take on new film projects with Amazon Studios. Patty Talahongva asked him to reflect on his work. The Detroit Art Institute recently purchased four ceramic figurines created by Jemez Potter Kathleen Wall from the Institute of American Indian Arts. She was named a living treasure by the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture and talks with us about her art. Native journalism goes back to 1828 with the launch of "The Cherokee Phoenix." In 1969, the American Indian Press Association started and one of its first reporters was Muscogee citizen Gary Fife. He joins us to share the wisdom he's gained in his many years in news radio. Oak Flat is sacred to the San Carlos Apache people. The U.S. Forest Service is slated to turn over the land to the mining company: Resolution Copper. Terry Rambler is the chairman of the San Carlos Apache Tribe. Editor Mark Trahant asked him about the fight to save this sacred site. Myron Dewey, Walker River Paiute, passed away on Sept. 26. He is the founder of Digital Smoke Signals and the co-director of the film "AWAKE: A DREAM FROM STANDING ROCK." Today we show you the trailer from his film.
  • The Art of Our Resiliency
    Monday, October 4
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    N. Bird Runningwater, Cheyenne and Mescalero Apache, spent 20 years at the Sundance Institute in the Indigenous film program and is leaving to take on new film projects with Amazon Studios. Patty Talahongva asked him to reflect on his work. The Detroit Art Institute recently purchased four ceramic figurines created by Jemez Potter Kathleen Wall from the Institute of American Indian Arts. She was named a living treasure by the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture and talks with us about her art. Native journalism goes back to 1828 with the launch of "The Cherokee Phoenix." In 1969, the American Indian Press Association started and one of its first reporters was Muscogee citizen Gary Fife. He joins us to share the wisdom he's gained in his many years in news radio. Oak Flat is sacred to the San Carlos Apache people. The U.S. Forest Service is slated to turn over the land to the mining company: Resolution Copper. Terry Rambler is the chairman of the San Carlos Apache Tribe. Editor Mark Trahant asked him about the fight to save this sacred site. Myron Dewey, Walker River Paiute, passed away on Sept. 26. He is the founder of Digital Smoke Signals and the co-director of the film "AWAKE: A DREAM FROM STANDING ROCK." Today we show you the trailer from his film.
  • The Art of Our Resiliency
    Friday, October 1
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    N. Bird Runningwater, Cheyenne and Mescalero Apache, spent 20 years at the Sundance Institute in the Indigenous film program and is leaving to take on new film projects with Amazon Studios. Patty Talahongva asked him to reflect on his work. The Detroit Art Institute recently purchased four ceramic figurines created by Jemez Potter Kathleen Wall from the Institute of American Indian Arts. She was named a living treasure by the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture and talks with us about her art. Native journalism goes back to 1828 with the launch of "The Cherokee Phoenix." In 1969, the American Indian Press Association started and one of its first reporters was Muscogee citizen Gary Fife. He joins us to share the wisdom he's gained in his many years in news radio. Oak Flat is sacred to the San Carlos Apache people. The U.S. Forest Service is slated to turn over the land to the mining company: Resolution Copper. Terry Rambler is the chairman of the San Carlos Apache Tribe. Editor Mark Trahant asked him about the fight to save this sacred site. Myron Dewey, Walker River Paiute, passed away on Sept. 26. He is the founder of Digital Smoke Signals and the co-director of the film "AWAKE: A DREAM FROM STANDING ROCK." Today we show you the trailer from his film.
  • They're Taking Us Seriously
    Friday, October 1
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Native journalism goes back to 1828 with the launch of "The Cherokee Phoenix." In 1969, the American Indian Press Association started and one of its first reporters was Muscogee citizen Gary Fife. He joins us today to share the wisdom he's gained in his many years in news radio. Thursday marks the "Day of Remembrance." It aims to honor boarding and residential school survivors. In Canada, it's the first official National Day for Truth and Reconciliation. ICT's national correspondent Mary Annette Pember joins us to talk about some of the events that are taking place. A lithium mine is being proposed to be built in Thacker Pass, which is close to the Northern Paiute and Western Shoshone tribal nations. Native people are opposed to the mine's location and say it's also the site of a massacre. Rachel Mosley reports on this issue in today's newscast.
  • They're Taking Us Seriously
    Friday, October 1
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    Native journalism goes back to 1828 with the launch of "The Cherokee Phoenix." In 1969, the American Indian Press Association started and one of its first reporters was Muscogee citizen Gary Fife. He joins us today to share the wisdom he's gained in his many years in news radio. Thursday marks the "Day of Remembrance." It aims to honor boarding and residential school survivors. In Canada, it's the first official National Day for Truth and Reconciliation. ICT's national correspondent Mary Annette Pember joins us to talk about some of the events that are taking place. A lithium mine is being proposed to be built in Thacker Pass, which is close to the Northern Paiute and Western Shoshone tribal nations. Native people are opposed to the mine's location and say it's also the site of a massacre. Rachel Mosley reports on this issue in today's newscast.
  • They're Taking Us Seriously
    Thursday, September 30
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Native journalism goes back to 1828 with the launch of "The Cherokee Phoenix." In 1969, the American Indian Press Association started and one of its first reporters was Muscogee citizen Gary Fife. He joins us today to share the wisdom he's gained in his many years in news radio. Thursday marks the "Day of Remembrance." It aims to honor boarding and residential school survivors. In Canada, it's the first official National Day for Truth and Reconciliation. ICT's national correspondent Mary Annette Pember joins us to talk about some of the events that are taking place. A lithium mine is being proposed to be built in Thacker Pass, which is close to the Northern Paiute and Western Shoshone tribal nations. Native people are opposed to the mine's location and say it's also the site of a massacre. Rachel Mosley reports on this issue in today's newscast.
  • Our 'church' Is at Risk
    Thursday, September 30
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    San Carlos Apache Tribal Chairman Terry Rambler is leading calls to Congress in an effort to save a piece of land that is sacred to his tribal nation. Oak Flat is located in southwestern Arizona, some 14 miles from the tribe's boundaries. It is currently under threat of being mined for copper. Rambler gives us an update about his advocacy and whether a piece of legislation could save the land from being destroyed. John Tahsuda III, Kiowa, is a regular contributor to ICT's newscast. In 2002, he worked as the staff director for the Senate Indian Affairs Committee. He also is a former principal deputy assistant secretary for Indian Affairs and served in that position from 2017 to 2020. Currently, he is a partner at Navigators Global, which is a company that provides political services to several industries, including tribes.
  • Our 'church' Is at Risk
    Thursday, September 30
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    San Carlos Apache Tribal Chairman Terry Rambler is leading calls to Congress in an effort to save a piece of land that is sacred to his tribal nation. Oak Flat is located in southwestern Arizona, some 14 miles from the tribe's boundaries. It is currently under threat of being mined for copper. Rambler gives us an update about his advocacy and whether a piece of legislation could save the land from being destroyed. John Tahsuda III, Kiowa, is a regular contributor to ICT's newscast. In 2002, he worked as the staff director for the Senate Indian Affairs Committee. He also is a former principal deputy assistant secretary for Indian Affairs and served in that position from 2017 to 2020. Currently, he is a partner at Navigators Global, which is a company that provides political services to several industries, including tribes.
  • Our 'church' Is at Risk
    Wednesday, September 29
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    San Carlos Apache Tribal Chairman Terry Rambler is leading calls to Congress in an effort to save a piece of land that is sacred to his tribal nation. Oak Flat is located in southwestern Arizona, some 14 miles from the tribe's boundaries. It is currently under threat of being mined for copper. Rambler gives us an update about his advocacy and whether a piece of legislation could save the land from being destroyed. John Tahsuda III, Kiowa, is a regular contributor to ICT's newscast. In 2002, he worked as the staff director for the Senate Indian Affairs Committee. He also is a former principal deputy assistant secretary for Indian Affairs and served in that position from 2017 to 2020. Currently, he is a partner at Navigators Global, which is a company that provides political services to several industries, including tribes.
  • Two Decades of Progress
    Wednesday, September 29
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    After two decades, N. Bird Runningwater, director of the Indigenous film program at the Sundance Institute, is parting ways with the organization. He is Cheyenne and Mescalero Apache. We find out what's next for him. ICT national correspondent Joaqlin Estus takes a deep dive into her reporting, "Good and bad days for Hawai'i businesses." She tells us more about tourism in Hawai'i.
  • Two Decades of Progress
    Wednesday, September 29
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    After two decades, N. Bird Runningwater, director of the Indigenous film program at the Sundance Institute, is parting ways with the organization. He is Cheyenne and Mescalero Apache. We find out what's next for him. ICT national correspondent Joaqlin Estus takes a deep dive into her reporting, "Good and bad days for Hawai'i businesses." She tells us more about tourism in Hawai'i.
  • Two Decades of Progress
    Tuesday, September 28
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    After two decades, N. Bird Runningwater, director of the Indigenous film program at the Sundance Institute, is parting ways with the organization. He is Cheyenne and Mescalero Apache. We find out what's next for him. ICT national correspondent Joaqlin Estus takes a deep dive into her reporting, "Good and bad days for Hawai'i businesses." She tells us more about tourism in Hawai'i.
  • Jemez Potter Reflects On Her Work
    Tuesday, September 28
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Kathleen Wall, Jemez Pueblo, received the New Mexico Governor's Award for Artistic Excellence. She is a graduate of the Institute of American Indian Arts and recently raised thousands of dollars for the school after four of her ceramic figures were purchased by the Detroit Art Museum. A brand new face to our newscast. Chris Aadland is Ojibwe and a shared ICT reporter with our partners at Underscore News. He?s from the Red Lake and Leech Lake nations and will soon move to Portland, Oregon, where he will cover Native communities in the Pacific Northwest. He's on the show to talk about tribes who were ahead of the curve in mandating COVID-19 vaccines.
  • Jemez Potter Reflects On Her Work
    Tuesday, September 28
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    Kathleen Wall, Jemez Pueblo, received the New Mexico Governor's Award for Artistic Excellence. She is a graduate of the Institute of American Indian Arts and recently raised thousands of dollars for the school after four of her ceramic figures were purchased by the Detroit Art Museum. A brand new face to our newscast. Chris Aadland is Ojibwe and a shared ICT reporter with our partners at Underscore News. He?s from the Red Lake and Leech Lake nations and will soon move to Portland, Oregon, where he will cover Native communities in the Pacific Northwest. He's on the show to talk about tribes who were ahead of the curve in mandating COVID-19 vaccines.
  • Jemez Potter Reflects On Her Work
    Monday, September 27
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Kathleen Wall, Jemez Pueblo, received the New Mexico Governor's Award for Artistic Excellence. She is a graduate of the Institute of American Indian Arts and recently raised thousands of dollars for the school after four of her ceramic figures were purchased by the Detroit Art Museum. A brand new face to our newscast. Chris Aadland is Ojibwe and a shared ICT reporter with our partners at Underscore News. He?s from the Red Lake and Leech Lake nations and will soon move to Portland, Oregon, where he will cover Native communities in the Pacific Northwest. He's on the show to talk about tribes who were ahead of the curve in mandating COVID-19 vaccines.
  • Making Language Accessible for Indigenous People
    Monday, September 27
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Sarah Young Bear-Brown, Meskwaki, joins us. Her work aims to advance Native people - and she's also a prominent advocate who is deaf. We're also joined by American Sign Language interpreter, Amber Braithwait. "Landback" appears all over Indian Country, and in Montana, it's more than just words. Amy Croover, Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska, is from the Nature Conservancy. She tells us about an important land transfer back to the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes. Decades in the making, the First American Museum is now open in Oklahoma City. Deputy Director Shoshana Wasserman, Muscogee Creek, has been key to its development. She joins us to talk about the themes in the museum. Injunuity is a series of short animations produced by Adrian Baker for PBS. He shares a piece called "TONGUES" with us. It features Tom Phillips, Alfredo Didrickson and Shawna Claw on the importance of Indigenous language.
  • Making Language Accessible for Indigenous People
    Monday, September 27
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    Sarah Young Bear-Brown, Meskwaki, joins us. Her work aims to advance Native people - and she's also a prominent advocate who is deaf. We're also joined by American Sign Language interpreter, Amber Braithwait. "Landback" appears all over Indian Country, and in Montana, it's more than just words. Amy Croover, Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska, is from the Nature Conservancy. She tells us about an important land transfer back to the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes. Decades in the making, the First American Museum is now open in Oklahoma City. Deputy Director Shoshana Wasserman, Muscogee Creek, has been key to its development. She joins us to talk about the themes in the museum. Injunuity is a series of short animations produced by Adrian Baker for PBS. He shares a piece called "TONGUES" with us. It features Tom Phillips, Alfredo Didrickson and Shawna Claw on the importance of Indigenous language.
  • Making Language Accessible for Indigenous People
    Friday, September 24
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Sarah Young Bear-Brown, Meskwaki, joins us. Her work aims to advance Native people - and she's also a prominent advocate who is deaf. We're also joined by American Sign Language interpreter, Amber Braithwait. "Landback" appears all over Indian Country, and in Montana, it's more than just words. Amy Croover, Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska, is from the Nature Conservancy. She tells us about an important land transfer back to the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes. Decades in the making, the First American Museum is now open in Oklahoma City. Deputy Director Shoshana Wasserman, Muscogee Creek, has been key to its development. She joins us to talk about the themes in the museum. Injunuity is a series of short animations produced by Adrian Baker for PBS. He shares a piece called "TONGUES" with us. It features Tom Phillips, Alfredo Didrickson and Shawna Claw on the importance of Indigenous language.
  • We're Telling Human Stories
    Friday, September 24
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Shoshana Wasserman played a huge part in the opening of the First Americans Museum in Oklahoma City. This project has been decades in the making. Wasserman is this epic museum's deputy director and she joins us to talk about how the grand opening went last weekend. Hunting for seals is a way of life for the Inupiaq people in Alaska. But with climate change, future generations may not be able to rely on this source of food. ICT's special correspondent, Meghan Sullivan, wrote about this issue in her story, "Drastic Changes: sea ice levels affecting seal hunting." Meghan joins us to tell us more about this issue facing the Inupiaq people.
  • We're Telling Human Stories
    Friday, September 24
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    Shoshana Wasserman played a huge part in the opening of the First Americans Museum in Oklahoma City. This project has been decades in the making. Wasserman is this epic museum's deputy director and she joins us to talk about how the grand opening went last weekend. Hunting for seals is a way of life for the Inupiaq people in Alaska. But with climate change, future generations may not be able to rely on this source of food. ICT's special correspondent, Meghan Sullivan, wrote about this issue in her story, "Drastic Changes: sea ice levels affecting seal hunting." Meghan joins us to tell us more about this issue facing the Inupiaq people.
  • We're Telling Human Stories
    Thursday, September 23
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Shoshana Wasserman played a huge part in the opening of the First Americans Museum in Oklahoma City. This project has been decades in the making. Wasserman is this epic museum's deputy director and she joins us to talk about how the grand opening went last weekend. Hunting for seals is a way of life for the Inupiaq people in Alaska. But with climate change, future generations may not be able to rely on this source of food. ICT's special correspondent, Meghan Sullivan, wrote about this issue in her story, "Drastic Changes: sea ice levels affecting seal hunting." Meghan joins us to tell us more about this issue facing the Inupiaq people.
  • Plains Indian sign language: 'It is our connection to the soil'
    Thursday, September 23
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    It is International week of the deaf. Joining the ICT newscast is Sarah Young Bear-Brown. She is from the Meskwaki nation in Iowa - and her list of professional titles is long. She is an advocate, activist and mother. She was recently invited by the White House to join a virtual conversation about Native people who are disabled. Also joining us is Amber Braithwaite. She is Crow Creek and serves as the American Sign Language interpreter for today's newscast. Holly Cook Macarro, Red Lake Ojibwe, is a regular contributor to our show. She's a partner at Spirit Rock Consulting. Holly has worked for tribal nations for more than 20 years and she's a regular guest commentator on our program.
  • Plains Indian sign language: 'It is our connection to the soil'
    Thursday, September 23
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    It is International week of the deaf. Joining the ICT newscast is Sarah Young Bear-Brown. She is from the Meskwaki nation in Iowa - and her list of professional titles is long. She is an advocate, activist and mother. She was recently invited by the White House to join a virtual conversation about Native people who are disabled. Also joining us is Amber Braithwaite. She is Crow Creek and serves as the American Sign Language interpreter for today's newscast. Holly Cook Macarro, Red Lake Ojibwe, is a regular contributor to our show. She's a partner at Spirit Rock Consulting. Holly has worked for tribal nations for more than 20 years and she's a regular guest commentator on our program.
  • Plains Indian sign language: 'It is our connection to the soil'
    Wednesday, September 22
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    It is International week of the deaf. Joining the ICT newscast is Sarah Young Bear-Brown. She is from the Meskwaki nation in Iowa - and her list of professional titles is long. She is an advocate, activist and mother. She was recently invited by the White House to join a virtual conversation about Native people who are disabled. Also joining us is Amber Braithwaite. She is Crow Creek and serves as the American Sign Language interpreter for today's newscast. Holly Cook Macarro, Red Lake Ojibwe, is a regular contributor to our show. She's a partner at Spirit Rock Consulting. Holly has worked for tribal nations for more than 20 years and she's a regular guest commentator on our program.
  • Aises Conference: 'together Towards Tomorrow'
    Wednesday, September 22
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    The 2021 annual national conference hosted by the American Indian Science and Engineering Society begins Sept. 23 in Phoenix, Arizona. The three-day event is themed, "together towards tomorrow." It will bring together more than 2,000 attendees to focus on advancing Indigenous people in the fields of science, engineering and math. On today's newscast, Sarah EchoHawk, AISES chief executive officer and Pawnee, gives highlights of what to expect. Henrietta Mann, Cheyenne, is a longtime education advocate. She joins us to talk about the national organization's council of elders, a group she helped create many years ago. Rick Stephens tells us about AISES' relationship with the Boeing Corporation. He is from the Pala Band of Mission Indians and is a board member for the organization. Jana Schmieding, Mniconjou, is an actor appearing in both "Rutherford Falls" and "Reservation Dogs." She is the keynote speaker of the AISES conference. We hear more about her message.
  • Aises Conference: 'together Towards Tomorrow'
    Wednesday, September 22
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    The 2021 annual national conference hosted by the American Indian Science and Engineering Society begins Sept. 23 in Phoenix, Arizona. The three-day event is themed, "together towards tomorrow." It will bring together more than 2,000 attendees to focus on advancing Indigenous people in the fields of science, engineering and math. On today's newscast, Sarah EchoHawk, AISES chief executive officer and Pawnee, gives highlights of what to expect. Henrietta Mann, Cheyenne, is a longtime education advocate. She joins us to talk about the national organization's council of elders, a group she helped create many years ago. Rick Stephens tells us about AISES' relationship with the Boeing Corporation. He is from the Pala Band of Mission Indians and is a board member for the organization. Jana Schmieding, Mniconjou, is an actor appearing in both "Rutherford Falls" and "Reservation Dogs." She is the keynote speaker of the AISES conference. We hear more about her message.
  • Aises Conference: 'together Towards Tomorrow'
    Tuesday, September 21
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    The 2021 annual national conference hosted by the American Indian Science and Engineering Society begins Sept. 23 in Phoenix, Arizona. The three-day event is themed, "together towards tomorrow." It will bring together more than 2,000 attendees to focus on advancing Indigenous people in the fields of science, engineering and math. On today's newscast, Sarah EchoHawk, AISES chief executive officer and Pawnee, gives highlights of what to expect. Henrietta Mann, Cheyenne, is a longtime education advocate. She joins us to talk about the national organization's council of elders, a group she helped create many years ago. Rick Stephens tells us about AISES' relationship with the Boeing Corporation. He is from the Pala Band of Mission Indians and is a board member for the organization. Jana Schmieding, Mniconjou, is an actor appearing in both "Rutherford Falls" and "Reservation Dogs." She is the keynote speaker of the AISES conference. We hear more about her message.
  • Transferring Land to the Rightful Stewards
    Tuesday, September 21
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Amy Croover is the state director of the nature conservancy in Montana. She is from the Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska and joins today's newscast to talk about the 132 acre land transfer in Montana. From the Met Gala to the Emmy's, fashion and other events have turned the spotlight on some Native people in attendance. ICT's Managing Editor Jourdan Bennett-Begaye, Dine, joins us to give us a breakdown of the events.
  • Transferring Land to the Rightful Stewards
    Tuesday, September 21
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    Amy Croover is the state director of the nature conservancy in Montana. She is from the Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska and joins today's newscast to talk about the 132 acre land transfer in Montana. From the Met Gala to the Emmy's, fashion and other events have turned the spotlight on some Native people in attendance. ICT's Managing Editor Jourdan Bennett-Begaye, Dine, joins us to give us a breakdown of the events.
  • Transferring Land to the Rightful Stewards
    Monday, September 20
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Amy Croover is the state director of the nature conservancy in Montana. She is from the Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska and joins today's newscast to talk about the 132 acre land transfer in Montana. From the Met Gala to the Emmy's, fashion and other events have turned the spotlight on some Native people in attendance. ICT's Managing Editor Jourdan Bennett-Begaye, Dine, joins us to give us a breakdown of the events.
  • Oklahoma's First Americans Museum Opens
    Monday, September 20
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Earlier this week, California Gov. Gavin Newsom defeated a recall and will stay in office. Here to discuss the results and reaction to the election is Tracy Edwards. She is the CEO of the Redding Rancheria located in Northern California. The Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians received federal restoration in 1994, and since then only men have been elected to lead the tribe. Rebecca Richards received the most votes and joins us today to talk about this historic win. Elders have been especially impacted during the coronavirus pandemic due to isolation. One study shows that prolonged social isolation is as harmful as smoking 15 cigarettes a day. Navajo Nation citizen Larry Curley is the executive director of National Indian Council on Aging, he joins us. Lone Pine Paiute Shoshone citizen Kathy Jefferson Bancroft, who is the Historic Preservation Officer for her tribe, and filmmaker Ann Kaneko join us to talk about the the documentary "MANZANAR DIVERTED: WHEN WATER BECOMES DUST." It's been in the making for decades and now finally the First Americans Museum is opening in Oklahoma City. This massive museum undertaking includes representation from all 39 tribes in the great state of Oklahoma, Kaitlin Onawa Boysel reports.
  • Oklahoma's First Americans Museum Opens
    Monday, September 20
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    Earlier this week, California Gov. Gavin Newsom defeated a recall and will stay in office. Here to discuss the results and reaction to the election is Tracy Edwards. She is the CEO of the Redding Rancheria located in Northern California. The Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians received federal restoration in 1994, and since then only men have been elected to lead the tribe. Rebecca Richards received the most votes and joins us today to talk about this historic win. Elders have been especially impacted during the coronavirus pandemic due to isolation. One study shows that prolonged social isolation is as harmful as smoking 15 cigarettes a day. Navajo Nation citizen Larry Curley is the executive director of National Indian Council on Aging, he joins us. Lone Pine Paiute Shoshone citizen Kathy Jefferson Bancroft, who is the Historic Preservation Officer for her tribe, and filmmaker Ann Kaneko join us to talk about the the documentary "MANZANAR DIVERTED: WHEN WATER BECOMES DUST." It's been in the making for decades and now finally the First Americans Museum is opening in Oklahoma City. This massive museum undertaking includes representation from all 39 tribes in the great state of Oklahoma, Kaitlin Onawa Boysel reports.
  • Oklahoma's First Americans Museum Opens
    Friday, September 17
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Earlier this week, California Gov. Gavin Newsom defeated a recall and will stay in office. Here to discuss the results and reaction to the election is Tracy Edwards. She is the CEO of the Redding Rancheria located in Northern California. The Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians received federal restoration in 1994, and since then only men have been elected to lead the tribe. Rebecca Richards received the most votes and joins us today to talk about this historic win. Elders have been especially impacted during the coronavirus pandemic due to isolation. One study shows that prolonged social isolation is as harmful as smoking 15 cigarettes a day. Navajo Nation citizen Larry Curley is the executive director of National Indian Council on Aging, he joins us. Lone Pine Paiute Shoshone citizen Kathy Jefferson Bancroft, who is the Historic Preservation Officer for her tribe, and filmmaker Ann Kaneko join us to talk about the the documentary "MANZANAR DIVERTED: WHEN WATER BECOMES DUST." It's been in the making for decades and now finally the First Americans Museum is opening in Oklahoma City. This massive museum undertaking includes representation from all 39 tribes in the great state of Oklahoma, Kaitlin Onawa Boysel reports.
  • 30-Year Regalia Fight Continues
    Friday, September 17
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    In 1992, Oglala citizen Sophia Marjanovic's request to wear anything other than a cap and gown at her high school graduation was considered controversial and because of the attention, she was targeted by conservative radio host Rush Limbaugh. She joins us today to talk about a problem that hasn't gone away in the three decades since her fight began. Next week Canada will hold what's called a "snap election," and candidates are working hard to get the Indigenous vote. There are several historic firsts happening in this race. Indigenous organizations are endorsing candidates for the first time, and more Indigenous candidates are running for office. Here to explain more about the election is citizen of the Metis Nation and former editor-in-chief of Indian Country Today Miles Morrisseau. It's been in the making for decades and now finally the First American's Museum is opening in Oklahoma City. This massive museum undertaking includes representation from all 39 tribes in the great state of Oklahoma, Kaitlin Onawa Boysel reports.
  • 30-Year Regalia Fight Continues
    Friday, September 17
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    In 1992, Oglala citizen Sophia Marjanovic's request to wear anything other than a cap and gown at her high school graduation was considered controversial and because of the attention, she was targeted by conservative radio host Rush Limbaugh. She joins us today to talk about a problem that hasn't gone away in the three decades since her fight began. Next week Canada will hold what's called a "snap election," and candidates are working hard to get the Indigenous vote. There are several historic firsts happening in this race. Indigenous organizations are endorsing candidates for the first time, and more Indigenous candidates are running for office. Here to explain more about the election is citizen of the Metis Nation and former editor-in-chief of Indian Country Today Miles Morrisseau. It's been in the making for decades and now finally the First American's Museum is opening in Oklahoma City. This massive museum undertaking includes representation from all 39 tribes in the great state of Oklahoma, Kaitlin Onawa Boysel reports.
  • 30-Year Regalia Fight Continues
    Thursday, September 16
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    In 1992, Oglala citizen Sophia Marjanovic's request to wear anything other than a cap and gown at her high school graduation was considered controversial and because of the attention, she was targeted by conservative radio host Rush Limbaugh. She joins us today to talk about a problem that hasn't gone away in the three decades since her fight began. Next week Canada will hold what's called a "snap election," and candidates are working hard to get the Indigenous vote. There are several historic firsts happening in this race. Indigenous organizations are endorsing candidates for the first time, and more Indigenous candidates are running for office. Here to explain more about the election is citizen of the Metis Nation and former editor-in-chief of Indian Country Today Miles Morrisseau. It's been in the making for decades and now finally the First American's Museum is opening in Oklahoma City. This massive museum undertaking includes representation from all 39 tribes in the great state of Oklahoma, Kaitlin Onawa Boysel reports.
  • The Native Vote In California's Recall Election
    Thursday, September 16
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    The Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians received federal restoration in 1994, and since then only men have been elected to lead the tribe. Joining us is Chairwoman Rebecca Richards to talk about her historic win as the first woman to lead her nation. California Gov. Gavin Newsom defeated a recall election Tuesday and will stay in office. CEO of the Redding Rancheria Tracy Edwards tells us about the recall election, what it meant for tribal sovereignty and voter turnout. John Tahsuda is a regular contributor to Indian Country Today. He's worked as the staff director for the Senate Indian Affairs Committee and he is also a former principal deputy assistant secretary for Indian Affairs. Today he is a partner with Navigators Global. He tells us about what could be another government shutdown.
  • The Native Vote In California's Recall Election
    Thursday, September 16
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    The Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians received federal restoration in 1994, and since then only men have been elected to lead the tribe. Joining us is Chairwoman Rebecca Richards to talk about her historic win as the first woman to lead her nation. California Gov. Gavin Newsom defeated a recall election Tuesday and will stay in office. CEO of the Redding Rancheria Tracy Edwards tells us about the recall election, what it meant for tribal sovereignty and voter turnout. John Tahsuda is a regular contributor to Indian Country Today. He's worked as the staff director for the Senate Indian Affairs Committee and he is also a former principal deputy assistant secretary for Indian Affairs. Today he is a partner with Navigators Global. He tells us about what could be another government shutdown.
  • The Native Vote In California's Recall Election
    Wednesday, September 15
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    The Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians received federal restoration in 1994, and since then only men have been elected to lead the tribe. Joining us is Chairwoman Rebecca Richards to talk about her historic win as the first woman to lead her nation. California Gov. Gavin Newsom defeated a recall election Tuesday and will stay in office. CEO of the Redding Rancheria Tracy Edwards tells us about the recall election, what it meant for tribal sovereignty and voter turnout. John Tahsuda is a regular contributor to Indian Country Today. He's worked as the staff director for the Senate Indian Affairs Committee and he is also a former principal deputy assistant secretary for Indian Affairs. Today he is a partner with Navigators Global. He tells us about what could be another government shutdown.
  • Check On Your Elders
    Wednesday, September 15
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    The pandemic has been very stressful for many different people. The National Indian Council on Aging created a new campaign reminding everyone to check up on elders during this time of isolation. One study shows that prolonged social isolation is as harmful as smoking 15 cigarettes per day. The organization's Executive Director Larry Curley, Navajo, joins us today to tell us more about this campaign. Filmmaker Ann Kaneko joins the show to talk about her recent documentary called "Manzanar Diverted: When Water Becomes Dust." Also joining us is Kathy Jefferson Bancroft who is the historic preservation officer for the Lone Pine Paiute Shoshone. They tell us about their new documentary following an unexpected alliance between California Natives and Japanese Americans.
  • Check On Your Elders
    Wednesday, September 15
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    The pandemic has been very stressful for many different people. The National Indian Council on Aging created a new campaign reminding everyone to check up on elders during this time of isolation. One study shows that prolonged social isolation is as harmful as smoking 15 cigarettes per day. The organization's Executive Director Larry Curley, Navajo, joins us today to tell us more about this campaign. Filmmaker Ann Kaneko joins the show to talk about her recent documentary called "Manzanar Diverted: When Water Becomes Dust." Also joining us is Kathy Jefferson Bancroft who is the historic preservation officer for the Lone Pine Paiute Shoshone. They tell us about their new documentary following an unexpected alliance between California Natives and Japanese Americans.
  • Check On Your Elders
    Tuesday, September 14
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    The pandemic has been very stressful for many different people. The National Indian Council on Aging created a new campaign reminding everyone to check up on elders during this time of isolation. One study shows that prolonged social isolation is as harmful as smoking 15 cigarettes per day. The organization's Executive Director Larry Curley, Navajo, joins us today to tell us more about this campaign. Filmmaker Ann Kaneko joins the show to talk about her recent documentary called "Manzanar Diverted: When Water Becomes Dust." Also joining us is Kathy Jefferson Bancroft who is the historic preservation officer for the Lone Pine Paiute Shoshone. They tell us about their new documentary following an unexpected alliance between California Natives and Japanese Americans.
  • Texas Abortion Law: Native Women Reproductive Righs
    Tuesday, September 14
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    On the show is Charon Asetoyer, Comanche, who is the CEO and founder of the Native American Women's Health Resource Center in South Dakota. She talks about the recent Texas law on abortions and what it means for Native women's reproductive rights. Cheri Madsen, Omaha Tribe of Nebraska, is a Paralympic wheelchair sprinter. She earned a silver and bronze medal at the 2020 games in Toyko. She talks about the experience, and more on what her future in the sport will look like. Dan Ninham, Oneida, is a freelance journalist. He joins the ICT newscast to give us a breakdown on the results of the Indigenous athletes who competed at Paralympics games.
  • Texas Abortion Law: Native Women Reproductive Righs
    Tuesday, September 14
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    On the show is Charon Asetoyer, Comanche, who is the CEO and founder of the Native American Women's Health Resource Center in South Dakota. She talks about the recent Texas law on abortions and what it means for Native women's reproductive rights. Cheri Madsen, Omaha Tribe of Nebraska, is a Paralympic wheelchair sprinter. She earned a silver and bronze medal at the 2020 games in Toyko. She talks about the experience, and more on what her future in the sport will look like. Dan Ninham, Oneida, is a freelance journalist. He joins the ICT newscast to give us a breakdown on the results of the Indigenous athletes who competed at Paralympics games.
  • Texas Abortion Law: Native Women Reproductive Righs
    Monday, September 13
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    On the show is Charon Asetoyer, Comanche, who is the CEO and founder of the Native American Women's Health Resource Center in South Dakota. She talks about the recent Texas law on abortions and what it means for Native women's reproductive rights. Cheri Madsen, Omaha Tribe of Nebraska, is a Paralympic wheelchair sprinter. She earned a silver and bronze medal at the 2020 games in Toyko. She talks about the experience, and more on what her future in the sport will look like. Dan Ninham, Oneida, is a freelance journalist. He joins the ICT newscast to give us a breakdown on the results of the Indigenous athletes who competed at Paralympics games.
  • Indian Country Honors The Past and Future
    Monday, September 13
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Anishinaabe citizen Charlie LeDuff was a reporter at the New York times in the spring of 2001, he had just won his first Pulitzer prize. LeDuff was covering the union and labor groups in the fall of 2001. When the terrorist attack shocked the world and the country for the next year, he reported from ground zero. He joins us to reflect on that day. Early childhood education is essential for the development of youth to be successful in school and beyond. Native American educators are indigenizing the curriculum at the Montessori American Indian Childcare Center in St. Paul, Minnesota. Janice LaFloe is its founder. She's a citizen of the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa. Patty Talahongva caught up with White Mountain Apache Musician Laura Ortman in France, where she was on the last day of her Jerome Camargo Residency. She's a classically-trained violinist, but her music is far from traditional. Indigenous people have made the desert their home for thousands of years but not all are controlled by tribal nations. Sacred sites like the Sleeping Giants are controlled by the Bureau of Land Management. Xolon Salinan citizen Deb Krol wrote about the Blythe Intaglio. She's an Indigenous affairs reporter for the Arizona Republic.
  • Indian Country Honors The Past and Future
    Monday, September 13
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    Anishinaabe citizen Charlie LeDuff was a reporter at the New York times in the spring of 2001, he had just won his first Pulitzer prize. LeDuff was covering the union and labor groups in the fall of 2001. When the terrorist attack shocked the world and the country for the next year, he reported from ground zero. He joins us to reflect on that day. Early childhood education is essential for the development of youth to be successful in school and beyond. Native American educators are indigenizing the curriculum at the Montessori American Indian Childcare Center in St. Paul, Minnesota. Janice LaFloe is its founder. She's a citizen of the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa. Patty Talahongva caught up with White Mountain Apache Musician Laura Ortman in France, where she was on the last day of her Jerome Camargo Residency. She's a classically-trained violinist, but her music is far from traditional. Indigenous people have made the desert their home for thousands of years but not all are controlled by tribal nations. Sacred sites like the Sleeping Giants are controlled by the Bureau of Land Management. Xolon Salinan citizen Deb Krol wrote about the Blythe Intaglio. She's an Indigenous affairs reporter for the Arizona Republic.
  • Indian Country Honors The Past and Future
    Friday, September 10
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Anishinaabe citizen Charlie LeDuff was a reporter at the New York times in the spring of 2001, he had just won his first Pulitzer prize. LeDuff was covering the union and labor groups in the fall of 2001. When the terrorist attack shocked the world and the country for the next year, he reported from ground zero. He joins us to reflect on that day. Early childhood education is essential for the development of youth to be successful in school and beyond. Native American educators are indigenizing the curriculum at the Montessori American Indian Childcare Center in St. Paul, Minnesota. Janice LaFloe is its founder. She's a citizen of the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa. Patty Talahongva caught up with White Mountain Apache Musician Laura Ortman in France, where she was on the last day of her Jerome Camargo Residency. She's a classically-trained violinist, but her music is far from traditional. Indigenous people have made the desert their home for thousands of years but not all are controlled by tribal nations. Sacred sites like the Sleeping Giants are controlled by the Bureau of Land Management. Xolon Salinan citizen Deb Krol wrote about the Blythe Intaglio. She's an Indigenous affairs reporter for the Arizona Republic.
  • Friday, September 10
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    No description available.
  • Friday, September 10
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    No description available.
  • Thursday, September 9
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    No description available.
  • Thursday, September 9
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    No description available.
  • Thursday, September 9
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    No description available.
  • Wednesday, September 8
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    No description available.
  • Music from France
    Wednesday, September 8
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Laura Ortman is a classically trained violinist from the White Mountain Apache Tribe. She joins us today from France where she tells us about her residency there. Ortman even gives a live performance. Stay tuned! Recent reporting by the Arizona Republic's Deb Krol, Xolon Salinan, gives a glimpse into sacred sites that are not controlled by tribal nations. We visit with her about her six-part series, "Indigenous people find legal, cultural barriers to protect sacred spaces off tribal lands."
  • Music from France
    Wednesday, September 8
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    Laura Ortman is a classically trained violinist from the White Mountain Apache Tribe. She joins us today from France where she tells us about her residency there. Ortman even gives a live performance. Stay tuned! Recent reporting by the Arizona Republic's Deb Krol, Xolon Salinan, gives a glimpse into sacred sites that are not controlled by tribal nations. We visit with her about her six-part series, "Indigenous people find legal, cultural barriers to protect sacred spaces off tribal lands."
  • Music from France
    Tuesday, September 7
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Laura Ortman is a classically trained violinist from the White Mountain Apache Tribe. She joins us today from France where she tells us about her residency there. Ortman even gives a live performance. Stay tuned! Recent reporting by the Arizona Republic's Deb Krol, Xolon Salinan, gives a glimpse into sacred sites that are not controlled by tribal nations. We visit with her about her six-part series, "Indigenous people find legal, cultural barriers to protect sacred spaces off tribal lands."
  • Indigenous People and Work
    Tuesday, September 7
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    The introduction of tribal gaming marked a turning point for many tribes. It's been an economic catalyst that has launched interesting enterprises. We sat down with Victor Rocha in Las Vegas at the National Indian Gaming Association Trade Show in July. He's the chair of the event and owner of Pechanga website for all things gaming. He shares some big picture questions about the industry. It takes money to start a business. ICT producer Aliyah Chavez, Kewa Pueblo, introduces us to a Native-owned venture capital firm. An Alaska Native scientist is breaking barriers as one of the first Inuit conservation biologists. ICT producer Kaitlin Onawa Boysel, Cherokee, has more. Indigenous designers and models are taking to the runway-all over the world. ICT producer Carina Dominguez, Pascua Yaqui, tells us more. In Alaska, the World Eskimo Indian Olympics showcases traditional methods needed to live in the cold Alaska environment. ICT production editor Quindrea Yazzie, Dine, shows us how they turn those skills into games that people who plank for exercise would envy.
  • Indigenous People and Work
    Tuesday, September 7
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    The introduction of tribal gaming marked a turning point for many tribes. It's been an economic catalyst that has launched interesting enterprises. We sat down with Victor Rocha in Las Vegas at the National Indian Gaming Association Trade Show in July. He's the chair of the event and owner of Pechanga website for all things gaming. He shares some big picture questions about the industry. It takes money to start a business. ICT producer Aliyah Chavez, Kewa Pueblo, introduces us to a Native-owned venture capital firm. An Alaska Native scientist is breaking barriers as one of the first Inuit conservation biologists. ICT producer Kaitlin Onawa Boysel, Cherokee, has more. Indigenous designers and models are taking to the runway-all over the world. ICT producer Carina Dominguez, Pascua Yaqui, tells us more. In Alaska, the World Eskimo Indian Olympics showcases traditional methods needed to live in the cold Alaska environment. ICT production editor Quindrea Yazzie, Dine, shows us how they turn those skills into games that people who plank for exercise would envy.
  • Indigenous People and Work
    Monday, September 6
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    The introduction of tribal gaming marked a turning point for many tribes. It's been an economic catalyst that has launched interesting enterprises. We sat down with Victor Rocha in Las Vegas at the National Indian Gaming Association Trade Show in July. He's the chair of the event and owner of Pechanga website for all things gaming. He shares some big picture questions about the industry. It takes money to start a business. ICT producer Aliyah Chavez, Kewa Pueblo, introduces us to a Native-owned venture capital firm. An Alaska Native scientist is breaking barriers as one of the first Inuit conservation biologists. ICT producer Kaitlin Onawa Boysel, Cherokee, has more. Indigenous designers and models are taking to the runway-all over the world. ICT producer Carina Dominguez, Pascua Yaqui, tells us more. In Alaska, the World Eskimo Indian Olympics showcases traditional methods needed to live in the cold Alaska environment. ICT production editor Quindrea Yazzie, Dine, shows us how they turn those skills into games that people who plank for exercise would envy.
  • Weekend Edition: A Look Around Indian Country
    Monday, September 6
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt?s administration has filed suit in the U.S. District Court in Oklahoma City to overturn the 2019 McGirt decision. Cherokee Principal Chief Chuck Hoskin Jr. and Attorney General Sara Hill reacted to the decision earlier this week. The Yurok Tribe in northern California is finding creative solutions to address food insecurity. The Carnegie-Knight News21 Project has this report. It's produced by Mackenzie Wilkes, with Beth Wallis and Nancy Spears from Arizona State University's Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication. Many families need help when it comes to understanding credit scores, budgeting, and overall financial management. Joining us to talk about economic self-sufficiency is Executive Director Christy Finsel and financial coach Felecia Freeman from the Oklahoma Native Assets Coalition. One of the most exciting dances at the powwow is the fancy feather dance. We have video with one of the premier dancers in this fast paced category. George Abeyta is Eastern Shoshone from Fort Washakie, Wyoming and he dances his style like no one else. We hope you enjoy!
  • Weekend Edition: A Look Around Indian Country
    Monday, September 6
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt?s administration has filed suit in the U.S. District Court in Oklahoma City to overturn the 2019 McGirt decision. Cherokee Principal Chief Chuck Hoskin Jr. and Attorney General Sara Hill reacted to the decision earlier this week. The Yurok Tribe in northern California is finding creative solutions to address food insecurity. The Carnegie-Knight News21 Project has this report. It's produced by Mackenzie Wilkes, with Beth Wallis and Nancy Spears from Arizona State University's Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication. Many families need help when it comes to understanding credit scores, budgeting, and overall financial management. Joining us to talk about economic self-sufficiency is Executive Director Christy Finsel and financial coach Felecia Freeman from the Oklahoma Native Assets Coalition. One of the most exciting dances at the powwow is the fancy feather dance. We have video with one of the premier dancers in this fast paced category. George Abeyta is Eastern Shoshone from Fort Washakie, Wyoming and he dances his style like no one else. We hope you enjoy!
  • Weekend Edition: A Look Around Indian Country
    Friday, September 3
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt?s administration has filed suit in the U.S. District Court in Oklahoma City to overturn the 2019 McGirt decision. Cherokee Principal Chief Chuck Hoskin Jr. and Attorney General Sara Hill reacted to the decision earlier this week. The Yurok Tribe in northern California is finding creative solutions to address food insecurity. The Carnegie-Knight News21 Project has this report. It's produced by Mackenzie Wilkes, with Beth Wallis and Nancy Spears from Arizona State University's Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication. Many families need help when it comes to understanding credit scores, budgeting, and overall financial management. Joining us to talk about economic self-sufficiency is Executive Director Christy Finsel and financial coach Felecia Freeman from the Oklahoma Native Assets Coalition. One of the most exciting dances at the powwow is the fancy feather dance. We have video with one of the premier dancers in this fast paced category. George Abeyta is Eastern Shoshone from Fort Washakie, Wyoming and he dances his style like no one else. We hope you enjoy!
  • Culturally Relevant Financial Education
    Friday, September 3
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Joining us today are Christy Finsel, Osage, and Felecia Freeman, Potawatomi, from the Oklahoma Native Assets Coalition. It's a national nonprofit organization dedicated to working with tribes to help create opportunities for economic self-sufficiency for tribal citizens. When the U.S. government signs treaties with other nations, it is expected to uphold the terms of those treaties. In 1868, the second Treaty of Fort Laramie was signed between the U.S. and several tribal nations in the great plains - and it specified health care. However the government did not fulfill that treaty obligation. Mary Annette Pember, Red Cliff Ojibwe, joins us now to talk about the case that brought it to court.
  • Culturally Relevant Financial Education
    Friday, September 3
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    Joining us today are Christy Finsel, Osage, and Felecia Freeman, Potawatomi, from the Oklahoma Native Assets Coalition. It's a national nonprofit organization dedicated to working with tribes to help create opportunities for economic self-sufficiency for tribal citizens. When the U.S. government signs treaties with other nations, it is expected to uphold the terms of those treaties. In 1868, the second Treaty of Fort Laramie was signed between the U.S. and several tribal nations in the great plains - and it specified health care. However the government did not fulfill that treaty obligation. Mary Annette Pember, Red Cliff Ojibwe, joins us now to talk about the case that brought it to court.
  • Culturally Relevant Financial Education
    Thursday, September 2
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Joining us today are Christy Finsel, Osage, and Felecia Freeman, Potawatomi, from the Oklahoma Native Assets Coalition. It's a national nonprofit organization dedicated to working with tribes to help create opportunities for economic self-sufficiency for tribal citizens. When the U.S. government signs treaties with other nations, it is expected to uphold the terms of those treaties. In 1868, the second Treaty of Fort Laramie was signed between the U.S. and several tribal nations in the great plains - and it specified health care. However the government did not fulfill that treaty obligation. Mary Annette Pember, Red Cliff Ojibwe, joins us now to talk about the case that brought it to court.
  • An Artistic Invitation to Rise Up
    Thursday, September 2
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Cares Act funding provided relief in many different ways, including the creation of a mural in Rapid City, South Dakota. Racing Magpie commissioned Oglala artist Micheal Two Bulls to create the large mural. Two Bulls is also a member of the musical group, The Wake Singers, and he's a printer at Pejuta Press. John Tahsuda III, Kiowa, is a regular contributor to Indian Country Today. In 2002, he worked as the staff director for the Senate Indian Affairs committee. He also is a former principal deputy assistant secretary for Indian Affairs and served in that position from 2017 to 2020. Prior, he worked with Navigators Global, a company that provides political services to several industries, including tribes.
  • An Artistic Invitation to Rise Up
    Thursday, September 2
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    Cares Act funding provided relief in many different ways, including the creation of a mural in Rapid City, South Dakota. Racing Magpie commissioned Oglala artist Micheal Two Bulls to create the large mural. Two Bulls is also a member of the musical group, The Wake Singers, and he's a printer at Pejuta Press. John Tahsuda III, Kiowa, is a regular contributor to Indian Country Today. In 2002, he worked as the staff director for the Senate Indian Affairs committee. He also is a former principal deputy assistant secretary for Indian Affairs and served in that position from 2017 to 2020. Prior, he worked with Navigators Global, a company that provides political services to several industries, including tribes.
  • An Artistic Invitation to Rise Up
    Wednesday, September 1
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Cares Act funding provided relief in many different ways, including the creation of a mural in Rapid City, South Dakota. Racing Magpie commissioned Oglala artist Micheal Two Bulls to create the large mural. Two Bulls is also a member of the musical group, The Wake Singers, and he's a printer at Pejuta Press. John Tahsuda III, Kiowa, is a regular contributor to Indian Country Today. In 2002, he worked as the staff director for the Senate Indian Affairs committee. He also is a former principal deputy assistant secretary for Indian Affairs and served in that position from 2017 to 2020. Prior, he worked with Navigators Global, a company that provides political services to several industries, including tribes.
  • Hurricane Ida Affecting Tribes
    Wednesday, September 1
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Citizens of the United Houma Nation in Louisiana are reeling from the impact of Hurricane Ida. Besides causing power outages, damaging homes and evacuations, more rain is expected. The tribe also don't have internet access. Still, we're lucky to have the principal chief joining us by phone to talk about this disaster and what they need. Reservation Dogs is busting stereotypes and ratings. Vincent Schilling is ICT's Associate Editor and he's been following the story.
  • Hurricane Ida Affecting Tribes
    Wednesday, September 1
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    Citizens of the United Houma Nation in Louisiana are reeling from the impact of Hurricane Ida. Besides causing power outages, damaging homes and evacuations, more rain is expected. The tribe also don't have internet access. Still, we're lucky to have the principal chief joining us by phone to talk about this disaster and what they need. Reservation Dogs is busting stereotypes and ratings. Vincent Schilling is ICT's Associate Editor and he's been following the story.