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Indian Country Today

Indian Country Today delivers daily news and analysis about Native America and global Indigenous communities. Stories are reported from bureaus in Phoenix, Washington D.C. and Anchorage. The host is Patty Talahongva.

  • Monday, June 21
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  • Monday, August 9
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  • Wednesday, August 11
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  • Thursday, August 12
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  • Friday, August 13
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  • Monday, August 16
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  • Friday, June 18
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    No description available.
  • The Big Voice of Sharice Davids
    Friday, June 18
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    She comes from the People of the Big Voice, so perhaps it?s fitting that Sharice Davids grew up to become one of the first Native women to be elected to Congress. As a child she loved to talk and that?s what also helped her win over the voters. She?s chosen to tell her story in a children?s book, ?Sharice?s Big Voice: A Native Kid Becomes A Congresswoman.? Marty Two Bulls, Sr. is an award winning cartoonist. He was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize, but didn?t win. In fact, nobody won. The reason: ?no consensus pick emerged.? Marty?s primary client is the South Dakota-based Lakota Times. The Pulitzer Board described his work as ?innovative and insightful cartoons that offer a Native American perspective on contemporary news events.? Two Bulls joins us today.
  • The Big Voice of Sharice Davids
    Friday, June 18
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    She comes from the People of the Big Voice, so perhaps it?s fitting that Sharice Davids grew up to become one of the first Native women to be elected to Congress. As a child she loved to talk and that?s what also helped her win over the voters. She?s chosen to tell her story in a children?s book, ?Sharice?s Big Voice: A Native Kid Becomes A Congresswoman.? Marty Two Bulls, Sr. is an award winning cartoonist. He was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize, but didn?t win. In fact, nobody won. The reason: ?no consensus pick emerged.? Marty?s primary client is the South Dakota-based Lakota Times. The Pulitzer Board described his work as ?innovative and insightful cartoons that offer a Native American perspective on contemporary news events.? Two Bulls joins us today.
  • The Big Voice of Sharice Davids
    Thursday, June 17
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    She comes from the People of the Big Voice, so perhaps it?s fitting that Sharice Davids grew up to become one of the first Native women to be elected to Congress. As a child she loved to talk and that?s what also helped her win over the voters. She?s chosen to tell her story in a children?s book, ?Sharice?s Big Voice: A Native Kid Becomes A Congresswoman.? Marty Two Bulls, Sr. is an award winning cartoonist. He was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize, but didn?t win. In fact, nobody won. The reason: ?no consensus pick emerged.? Marty?s primary client is the South Dakota-based Lakota Times. The Pulitzer Board described his work as ?innovative and insightful cartoons that offer a Native American perspective on contemporary news events.? Two Bulls joins us today.
  • Court Rules On Tribal Police Authority
    Thursday, June 17
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Earlier this month, the U.S. Supreme Court held that a tribal police officer has authority to detain temporarily and to search non-Indian persons traveling on public rights-of-way running through a reservation for potential violations of state or federal law. Attorney Trent Shores joins us to break this down. A member of the Choctaw Nation, he?s at GableGotwals in Tulsa, Oklahoma. He served 18 years in the Department of Justice, under four presidents and seven U.S. attorney generals. He chaired the Native American Issues Subcommittee to the Attorney General?s Advisory Council. He recently left the Northern District of Oklahoma as attorney general.
  • Court Rules On Tribal Police Authority
    Thursday, June 17
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    Earlier this month, the U.S. Supreme Court held that a tribal police officer has authority to detain temporarily and to search non-Indian persons traveling on public rights-of-way running through a reservation for potential violations of state or federal law. Attorney Trent Shores joins us to break this down. A member of the Choctaw Nation, he?s at GableGotwals in Tulsa, Oklahoma. He served 18 years in the Department of Justice, under four presidents and seven U.S. attorney generals. He chaired the Native American Issues Subcommittee to the Attorney General?s Advisory Council. He recently left the Northern District of Oklahoma as attorney general.
  • Court Rules On Tribal Police Authority
    Wednesday, June 16
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Earlier this month, the U.S. Supreme Court held that a tribal police officer has authority to detain temporarily and to search non-Indian persons traveling on public rights-of-way running through a reservation for potential violations of state or federal law. Attorney Trent Shores joins us to break this down. A member of the Choctaw Nation, he?s at GableGotwals in Tulsa, Oklahoma. He served 18 years in the Department of Justice, under four presidents and seven U.S. attorney generals. He chaired the Native American Issues Subcommittee to the Attorney General?s Advisory Council. He recently left the Northern District of Oklahoma as attorney general.
  • Healing Through Horses
    Wednesday, June 16
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    The Hunkpapa leader Sitting Bull was a star in Buffalo Bill?s Wild West Show in 1885. The horse he rode was trained to dance at the sound of gunshot. In 1890, Sitting Bull was killed outside his cabin by Indian agents. Legend has it that the horse danced and fell to the ground when Sitting Bull was assassinated. The legacy of Sitting Bull?s horses lives on today. Jon Eagle, Sr. has made it his life?s work to bring healing through horses. Eagle and his family started a breeding and equine therapy business called Becoming one with the Spirit of the Horse. Many are familiar with key fields in academia like Native American studies or ethnic studies, but what about other disciplines like oceania or Pacific Islands studies that allow studies to explore the cultural histories of the many Indigenous people in the Pacific Ocean? Thomas Manglona, Chamorro and a graduate from Stanford University's journalism program, just finished a 41-minute documentary, ?The Ocean is the School: Pacific Islanders Transforming Higher-ed".
  • Healing Through Horses
    Wednesday, June 16
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    The Hunkpapa leader Sitting Bull was a star in Buffalo Bill?s Wild West Show in 1885. The horse he rode was trained to dance at the sound of gunshot. In 1890, Sitting Bull was killed outside his cabin by Indian agents. Legend has it that the horse danced and fell to the ground when Sitting Bull was assassinated. The legacy of Sitting Bull?s horses lives on today. Jon Eagle, Sr. has made it his life?s work to bring healing through horses. Eagle and his family started a breeding and equine therapy business called Becoming one with the Spirit of the Horse. Many are familiar with key fields in academia like Native American studies or ethnic studies, but what about other disciplines like oceania or Pacific Islands studies that allow studies to explore the cultural histories of the many Indigenous people in the Pacific Ocean? Thomas Manglona, Chamorro and a graduate from Stanford University's journalism program, just finished a 41-minute documentary, ?The Ocean is the School: Pacific Islanders Transforming Higher-ed".
  • Healing Through Horses
    Tuesday, June 15
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    The Hunkpapa leader Sitting Bull was a star in Buffalo Bill?s Wild West Show in 1885. The horse he rode was trained to dance at the sound of gunshot. In 1890, Sitting Bull was killed outside his cabin by Indian agents. Legend has it that the horse danced and fell to the ground when Sitting Bull was assassinated. The legacy of Sitting Bull?s horses lives on today. Jon Eagle, Sr. has made it his life?s work to bring healing through horses. Eagle and his family started a breeding and equine therapy business called Becoming one with the Spirit of the Horse. Many are familiar with key fields in academia like Native American studies or ethnic studies, but what about other disciplines like oceania or Pacific Islands studies that allow studies to explore the cultural histories of the many Indigenous people in the Pacific Ocean? Thomas Manglona, Chamorro and a graduate from Stanford University's journalism program, just finished a 41-minute documentary, ?The Ocean is the School: Pacific Islanders Transforming Higher-ed".
  • Tribal Gaming Optimistic About Recovery
    Tuesday, June 15
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Changes are coming to the gaming industry that are already affecting tribally owned casinos. Across the country more and more states are opening up sports betting. To break it all down for us today is Victor Rocha. He?s the founder of Pechanga.net and this year is the conference chairman for the National Indian Gaming Association Oil pipelines are making news with the decision to drop the Keystone XL pipeline last week and the on-going fight against the Enbridge pipelines. Mary Annette Pember is our national correspondent covering this issue and she joins us today to give us an update.
  • Tribal Gaming Optimistic About Recovery
    Tuesday, June 15
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    Changes are coming to the gaming industry that are already affecting tribally owned casinos. Across the country more and more states are opening up sports betting. To break it all down for us today is Victor Rocha. He?s the founder of Pechanga.net and this year is the conference chairman for the National Indian Gaming Association Oil pipelines are making news with the decision to drop the Keystone XL pipeline last week and the on-going fight against the Enbridge pipelines. Mary Annette Pember is our national correspondent covering this issue and she joins us today to give us an update.
  • Tribal Gaming Optimistic About Recovery
    Monday, June 14
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Changes are coming to the gaming industry that are already affecting tribally owned casinos. Across the country more and more states are opening up sports betting. To break it all down for us today is Victor Rocha. He?s the founder of Pechanga.net and this year is the conference chairman for the National Indian Gaming Association Oil pipelines are making news with the decision to drop the Keystone XL pipeline last week and the on-going fight against the Enbridge pipelines. Mary Annette Pember is our national correspondent covering this issue and she joins us today to give us an update.
  • Celebrating Indian Country Milestones
    Monday, June 14
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    The senate confirmation hearing process is starting for Bryan Newland. The Keystone XL Pipeline may be terminated but land defenders are still facing charges for their part in the protests against the pipeline. As a challenging school year comes to a close, Interior Secretary Deb Haaland is congratulating Tribal graduates of the Class of 2021. Canada?s Yukon government is agreeing to establish a separate school board for First Nations students. This week marks the 77th anniversary of D-Day when Allied forces landed in Normandy, France, to help liberate Europe from Germany and turned the course of World War II.
  • Celebrating Indian Country Milestones
    Monday, June 14
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    The senate confirmation hearing process is starting for Bryan Newland. The Keystone XL Pipeline may be terminated but land defenders are still facing charges for their part in the protests against the pipeline. As a challenging school year comes to a close, Interior Secretary Deb Haaland is congratulating Tribal graduates of the Class of 2021. Canada?s Yukon government is agreeing to establish a separate school board for First Nations students. This week marks the 77th anniversary of D-Day when Allied forces landed in Normandy, France, to help liberate Europe from Germany and turned the course of World War II.
  • Celebrating Indian Country Milestones
    Friday, June 11
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    The senate confirmation hearing process is starting for Bryan Newland. The Keystone XL Pipeline may be terminated but land defenders are still facing charges for their part in the protests against the pipeline. As a challenging school year comes to a close, Interior Secretary Deb Haaland is congratulating Tribal graduates of the Class of 2021. Canada?s Yukon government is agreeing to establish a separate school board for First Nations students. This week marks the 77th anniversary of D-Day when Allied forces landed in Normandy, France, to help liberate Europe from Germany and turned the course of World War II.
  • The Keystone Xl Pipeline's End
    Friday, June 11
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Faith Spotted Eagle is a land defender and water defender. For 13 years she's been on the frontline in the battle against the Keystone XL Pipeline. Today she's celebrating. News came late Wednesday that TransCanada Energy is terminating Phase 4 of the Keystone pipeline. Faith joins us to talk about her journey and this victory. People opposing the Enbridge Line 3 pipeline kicked off a summer of resistance this past week as they participated in the Treaty People Gathering organized by several Indigenous and allied organizations. Taking place in Northern Minnesota, Indigenous people and allies gathered to oppose the controversial project. Our national correspondent, Mary Annette Pember takes us to the gathering. This month is Indigenous Heritage Month in Canada. And one First Nations hip hop duo is getting noticed by millions. Snotty Nose Rez Kids recently found themselves on the top of both YouTube and Spotify. Vincent Schilling talked to the group about their popularity and how they blend tradition with hip hop.
  • The Keystone Xl Pipeline's End
    Friday, June 11
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    Faith Spotted Eagle is a land defender and water defender. For 13 years she's been on the frontline in the battle against the Keystone XL Pipeline. Today she's celebrating. News came late Wednesday that TransCanada Energy is terminating Phase 4 of the Keystone pipeline. Faith joins us to talk about her journey and this victory. People opposing the Enbridge Line 3 pipeline kicked off a summer of resistance this past week as they participated in the Treaty People Gathering organized by several Indigenous and allied organizations. Taking place in Northern Minnesota, Indigenous people and allies gathered to oppose the controversial project. Our national correspondent, Mary Annette Pember takes us to the gathering. This month is Indigenous Heritage Month in Canada. And one First Nations hip hop duo is getting noticed by millions. Snotty Nose Rez Kids recently found themselves on the top of both YouTube and Spotify. Vincent Schilling talked to the group about their popularity and how they blend tradition with hip hop.
  • The Keystone Xl Pipeline's End
    Thursday, June 10
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Faith Spotted Eagle is a land defender and water defender. For 13 years she's been on the frontline in the battle against the Keystone XL Pipeline. Today she's celebrating. News came late Wednesday that TransCanada Energy is terminating Phase 4 of the Keystone pipeline. Faith joins us to talk about her journey and this victory. People opposing the Enbridge Line 3 pipeline kicked off a summer of resistance this past week as they participated in the Treaty People Gathering organized by several Indigenous and allied organizations. Taking place in Northern Minnesota, Indigenous people and allies gathered to oppose the controversial project. Our national correspondent, Mary Annette Pember takes us to the gathering. This month is Indigenous Heritage Month in Canada. And one First Nations hip hop duo is getting noticed by millions. Snotty Nose Rez Kids recently found themselves on the top of both YouTube and Spotify. Vincent Schilling talked to the group about their popularity and how they blend tradition with hip hop.
  • Indigenous Arts and Culture Leader Retires
    Thursday, June 10
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    After nine years of leading the Autry Museum of the American West, its president and CEO is retiring. Rick West is also the founding Director of the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of the American Indian, where he served as Director from 1990-2007. He's an attorney and a citizen of the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes in Oklahoma. John Tahsuda, III is a regular contributor to Indian Country Today. He's worked as the staff director for the Senate Indian Affairs Committee and he is also a former principal deputy assistant secretary for Indian Affairs. John Tahsuda joins us today to talk about policy and the impact on Indian Country.
  • Indigenous Arts and Culture Leader Retires
    Thursday, June 10
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    After nine years of leading the Autry Museum of the American West, its president and CEO is retiring. Rick West is also the founding Director of the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of the American Indian, where he served as Director from 1990-2007. He's an attorney and a citizen of the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes in Oklahoma. John Tahsuda, III is a regular contributor to Indian Country Today. He's worked as the staff director for the Senate Indian Affairs Committee and he is also a former principal deputy assistant secretary for Indian Affairs. John Tahsuda joins us today to talk about policy and the impact on Indian Country.
  • Indigenous Arts and Culture Leader Retires
    Wednesday, June 9
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    After nine years of leading the Autry Museum of the American West, its president and CEO is retiring. Rick West is also the founding Director of the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of the American Indian, where he served as Director from 1990-2007. He's an attorney and a citizen of the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes in Oklahoma. John Tahsuda, III is a regular contributor to Indian Country Today. He's worked as the staff director for the Senate Indian Affairs Committee and he is also a former principal deputy assistant secretary for Indian Affairs. John Tahsuda joins us today to talk about policy and the impact on Indian Country.
  • Two-Spirit Pride Stories
    Wednesday, June 9
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Many Native LGBTQ youth are sitting in classrooms where their teachers and textbooks fail to appropriately address their identities, behaviors and experiences. Nowhere is this absence more clear, and potentially more damaging, than in sex education. Asia Brown is a sexual health communications specialist for the Washington Youth Sexual Health project. Brown supports the circulation of youth friendly and inclusive sexual health content. She's also a team member at We R Native, an organization striving to promote holistic health and positive growth in local communities and the nation at large. Sherente' Harris is a cultural educator, artist and activist. Harris is the subject of a recently released documentary, "Being Thunder." Over the course of several years, the film documents the two-spirit, gender-queer teenager from the Narragansett tribe in Rhode Island revealing the struggles faced by the determined teen. She is currently attending Brown University. As Indian Country continues to navigate the coronavirus pandemic, one thing is already clear, the exact numbers of cases may never be known. Data is held by a number of entities, from tribal, state, county and even foreign medical centers creates barriers to collecting the information. Indian Country Today partnered with the Indigenous Investigative Collective to look into this issue. Jourdan Bennett-Begaye, our managing editor, was a part of this team reporting on the challenges. She joins us now to explain more about what they found and what they didn't find.
  • Two-Spirit Pride Stories
    Wednesday, June 9
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    Many Native LGBTQ youth are sitting in classrooms where their teachers and textbooks fail to appropriately address their identities, behaviors and experiences. Nowhere is this absence more clear, and potentially more damaging, than in sex education. Asia Brown is a sexual health communications specialist for the Washington Youth Sexual Health project. Brown supports the circulation of youth friendly and inclusive sexual health content. She's also a team member at We R Native, an organization striving to promote holistic health and positive growth in local communities and the nation at large. Sherente' Harris is a cultural educator, artist and activist. Harris is the subject of a recently released documentary, "Being Thunder." Over the course of several years, the film documents the two-spirit, gender-queer teenager from the Narragansett tribe in Rhode Island revealing the struggles faced by the determined teen. She is currently attending Brown University. As Indian Country continues to navigate the coronavirus pandemic, one thing is already clear, the exact numbers of cases may never be known. Data is held by a number of entities, from tribal, state, county and even foreign medical centers creates barriers to collecting the information. Indian Country Today partnered with the Indigenous Investigative Collective to look into this issue. Jourdan Bennett-Begaye, our managing editor, was a part of this team reporting on the challenges. She joins us now to explain more about what they found and what they didn't find.
  • Two-Spirit Pride Stories
    Tuesday, June 8
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Many Native LGBTQ youth are sitting in classrooms where their teachers and textbooks fail to appropriately address their identities, behaviors and experiences. Nowhere is this absence more clear, and potentially more damaging, than in sex education. Asia Brown is a sexual health communications specialist for the Washington Youth Sexual Health project. Brown supports the circulation of youth friendly and inclusive sexual health content. She's also a team member at We R Native, an organization striving to promote holistic health and positive growth in local communities and the nation at large. Sherente' Harris is a cultural educator, artist and activist. Harris is the subject of a recently released documentary, "Being Thunder." Over the course of several years, the film documents the two-spirit, gender-queer teenager from the Narragansett tribe in Rhode Island revealing the struggles faced by the determined teen. She is currently attending Brown University. As Indian Country continues to navigate the coronavirus pandemic, one thing is already clear, the exact numbers of cases may never be known. Data is held by a number of entities, from tribal, state, county and even foreign medical centers creates barriers to collecting the information. Indian Country Today partnered with the Indigenous Investigative Collective to look into this issue. Jourdan Bennett-Begaye, our managing editor, was a part of this team reporting on the challenges. She joins us now to explain more about what they found and what they didn't find.
  • Protecting Future Generations
    Tuesday, June 8
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Three new laws in Nevada are bringing welcomed changes for tribal citizens. One bill will grant free college tuition to Native students, another will end the use of Native mascots and the third will end the so called "sundown sirens" which were used historically to signal all people of color to leave town after dark. Governor Steve Sisolak signed all three bills into law at the historic government run, Stewart Indian School, which was open for 90 years. Joining us Monday to talk about these bills and the impact on tribal citizens is Stacey Montooth, executive director of the Nevada Indian Commission. One Billion dollars is being allocated for broadband in Indian Country. ICT reporter Kolby KickingWoman spoke with Secretary of Commerce Gina Raimondo about the program and how tribes can apply.
  • Protecting Future Generations
    Tuesday, June 8
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    Three new laws in Nevada are bringing welcomed changes for tribal citizens. One bill will grant free college tuition to Native students, another will end the use of Native mascots and the third will end the so called "sundown sirens" which were used historically to signal all people of color to leave town after dark. Governor Steve Sisolak signed all three bills into law at the historic government run, Stewart Indian School, which was open for 90 years. Joining us Monday to talk about these bills and the impact on tribal citizens is Stacey Montooth, executive director of the Nevada Indian Commission. One Billion dollars is being allocated for broadband in Indian Country. ICT reporter Kolby KickingWoman spoke with Secretary of Commerce Gina Raimondo about the program and how tribes can apply.
  • Protecting Future Generations
    Monday, June 7
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Three new laws in Nevada are bringing welcomed changes for tribal citizens. One bill will grant free college tuition to Native students, another will end the use of Native mascots and the third will end the so called "sundown sirens" which were used historically to signal all people of color to leave town after dark. Governor Steve Sisolak signed all three bills into law at the historic government run, Stewart Indian School, which was open for 90 years. Joining us Monday to talk about these bills and the impact on tribal citizens is Stacey Montooth, executive director of the Nevada Indian Commission. One Billion dollars is being allocated for broadband in Indian Country. ICT reporter Kolby KickingWoman spoke with Secretary of Commerce Gina Raimondo about the program and how tribes can apply.
  • Warriors Across Indian Country
    Monday, June 7
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Joining us is Patty Loew, Bad River Ojibwe, a professor at the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University in Illinois. She's also produced several documentaries like the award-winning "Way of the Warrior." With so much happening in the world of Indian Country sports, we have invited Brent Cahwee, Pawnee and Yuchi, to give us an update. Brent is the co-founder of NDN Sports, a digital website, which covers Native athletes at the high school, college, and professional levels. Plus John Herrington, Chickasaw, is a retired Naval Aviator, engineer and former NASA astronaut. In 2002, Herrington became the first Native American to fly in space. ICT producer-reporter Kaitlin Onawa Boysel finds out how astronauts sleep in space. A new school in Lincoln, Nebraska, will be named after Ponca leader Standing Bear. He won the landmark case, Standing Bear v. Crook, in 1879. Joining us to share the story of Standing Bear is Larry Wright Jr., chairman of the Ponca Tribe of Nebraska.
  • Warriors Across Indian Country
    Monday, June 7
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    Joining us is Patty Loew, Bad River Ojibwe, a professor at the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University in Illinois. She's also produced several documentaries like the award-winning "Way of the Warrior." With so much happening in the world of Indian Country sports, we have invited Brent Cahwee, Pawnee and Yuchi, to give us an update. Brent is the co-founder of NDN Sports, a digital website, which covers Native athletes at the high school, college, and professional levels. Plus John Herrington, Chickasaw, is a retired Naval Aviator, engineer and former NASA astronaut. In 2002, Herrington became the first Native American to fly in space. ICT producer-reporter Kaitlin Onawa Boysel finds out how astronauts sleep in space. A new school in Lincoln, Nebraska, will be named after Ponca leader Standing Bear. He won the landmark case, Standing Bear v. Crook, in 1879. Joining us to share the story of Standing Bear is Larry Wright Jr., chairman of the Ponca Tribe of Nebraska.
  • Warriors Across Indian Country
    Friday, June 4
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Joining us is Patty Loew, Bad River Ojibwe, a professor at the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University in Illinois. She's also produced several documentaries like the award-winning "Way of the Warrior." With so much happening in the world of Indian Country sports, we have invited Brent Cahwee, Pawnee and Yuchi, to give us an update. Brent is the co-founder of NDN Sports, a digital website, which covers Native athletes at the high school, college, and professional levels. Plus John Herrington, Chickasaw, is a retired Naval Aviator, engineer and former NASA astronaut. In 2002, Herrington became the first Native American to fly in space. ICT producer-reporter Kaitlin Onawa Boysel finds out how astronauts sleep in space. A new school in Lincoln, Nebraska, will be named after Ponca leader Standing Bear. He won the landmark case, Standing Bear v. Crook, in 1879. Joining us to share the story of Standing Bear is Larry Wright Jr., chairman of the Ponca Tribe of Nebraska.
  • Standing Bear: A Journey of Purpose
    Friday, June 4
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    A new school in Lincoln, Nebraska will be named Standing Bear High School. The board of education voted unanimously for the name. It's set to open in 2023. Standing Bear was a leader of the Ponca Tribe. He won the landmark case, Standing Bear v. Crook in 1879. It recognized that an Indian is a "person" under the law and entitled to rights and protection. Standing Bear's speech in the courtroom was a defining moment. He said, quote: "That hand is not the color of yours, but if I prick it, the blood will flow, and I shall feel pain. The blood is of the same color as yours. God made me, and I am a Man." Joining us to share the story of Standing Bear is Larry Wright Jr., chairman of the Ponca Tribe of Nebraska. It's the 50th anniversary of the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act, which set up a unique way the federal government would deal with Alaska Natives and land management. ANCSA established 13 for-profit Alaska Native regional corporations, and more than 200 for-profit village corporations. More than 44 million acres of land was divided between the corporations, in exchange for the extinguishment of Indigenous land claims. Alaska Natives and their descendants are the shareholders for these corporations, leading to a new type of Federal policy tied to corporate ownership rather than lands in trust. Today, the corporations provide social services, cultural programs, jobs, and scholarships for the Alaska Native people they serve. But as a piece of legislation that is open to amendments, the Alaska Native corporate system is still evolving. As the 50th Anniversary for this landmark legislation approaches, Indian Country Today will be examining some of the critical issues and debates surrounding ANCSA. Joining us today is ICT journalist Meghan Sullivan, who is overseeing our coverage of ANCSA.
  • Standing Bear: A Journey of Purpose
    Friday, June 4
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    A new school in Lincoln, Nebraska will be named Standing Bear High School. The board of education voted unanimously for the name. It's set to open in 2023. Standing Bear was a leader of the Ponca Tribe. He won the landmark case, Standing Bear v. Crook in 1879. It recognized that an Indian is a "person" under the law and entitled to rights and protection. Standing Bear's speech in the courtroom was a defining moment. He said, quote: "That hand is not the color of yours, but if I prick it, the blood will flow, and I shall feel pain. The blood is of the same color as yours. God made me, and I am a Man." Joining us to share the story of Standing Bear is Larry Wright Jr., chairman of the Ponca Tribe of Nebraska. It's the 50th anniversary of the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act, which set up a unique way the federal government would deal with Alaska Natives and land management. ANCSA established 13 for-profit Alaska Native regional corporations, and more than 200 for-profit village corporations. More than 44 million acres of land was divided between the corporations, in exchange for the extinguishment of Indigenous land claims. Alaska Natives and their descendants are the shareholders for these corporations, leading to a new type of Federal policy tied to corporate ownership rather than lands in trust. Today, the corporations provide social services, cultural programs, jobs, and scholarships for the Alaska Native people they serve. But as a piece of legislation that is open to amendments, the Alaska Native corporate system is still evolving. As the 50th Anniversary for this landmark legislation approaches, Indian Country Today will be examining some of the critical issues and debates surrounding ANCSA. Joining us today is ICT journalist Meghan Sullivan, who is overseeing our coverage of ANCSA.
  • Standing Bear: A Journey of Purpose
    Thursday, June 3
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    A new school in Lincoln, Nebraska will be named Standing Bear High School. The board of education voted unanimously for the name. It's set to open in 2023. Standing Bear was a leader of the Ponca Tribe. He won the landmark case, Standing Bear v. Crook in 1879. It recognized that an Indian is a "person" under the law and entitled to rights and protection. Standing Bear's speech in the courtroom was a defining moment. He said, quote: "That hand is not the color of yours, but if I prick it, the blood will flow, and I shall feel pain. The blood is of the same color as yours. God made me, and I am a Man." Joining us to share the story of Standing Bear is Larry Wright Jr., chairman of the Ponca Tribe of Nebraska. It's the 50th anniversary of the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act, which set up a unique way the federal government would deal with Alaska Natives and land management. ANCSA established 13 for-profit Alaska Native regional corporations, and more than 200 for-profit village corporations. More than 44 million acres of land was divided between the corporations, in exchange for the extinguishment of Indigenous land claims. Alaska Natives and their descendants are the shareholders for these corporations, leading to a new type of Federal policy tied to corporate ownership rather than lands in trust. Today, the corporations provide social services, cultural programs, jobs, and scholarships for the Alaska Native people they serve. But as a piece of legislation that is open to amendments, the Alaska Native corporate system is still evolving. As the 50th Anniversary for this landmark legislation approaches, Indian Country Today will be examining some of the critical issues and debates surrounding ANCSA. Joining us today is ICT journalist Meghan Sullivan, who is overseeing our coverage of ANCSA.
  • Restoring The Seneca Nation's History
    Thursday, June 3
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    It's been a rocky year for tribes. And then, for the Seneca Nation of Indians, came a victory. The tribal constitution was established in 1848. And more than 50 years before that, President George Washington gifted the Seneca Chief Red Jacket a peace medal. It's been gone from the Seneca people for more than 100 years, but now, it's home. Joining us today to talk about the return of the peace medal is the Seneca President Matthew Pagels. New Mexico voters just picked the candidate to replace Deb Haaland in the House of Representatives, and several Natives are waiting to be confirmed to federal posts. To break it all down we have Holly Cook Macarro with us. Macarro, Red Lake Ojibwe, is a partner with Spirit Rock Consulting and is a regular contributor to our news program.
  • Restoring The Seneca Nation's History
    Thursday, June 3
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    It's been a rocky year for tribes. And then, for the Seneca Nation of Indians, came a victory. The tribal constitution was established in 1848. And more than 50 years before that, President George Washington gifted the Seneca Chief Red Jacket a peace medal. It's been gone from the Seneca people for more than 100 years, but now, it's home. Joining us today to talk about the return of the peace medal is the Seneca President Matthew Pagels. New Mexico voters just picked the candidate to replace Deb Haaland in the House of Representatives, and several Natives are waiting to be confirmed to federal posts. To break it all down we have Holly Cook Macarro with us. Macarro, Red Lake Ojibwe, is a partner with Spirit Rock Consulting and is a regular contributor to our news program.
  • Restoring The Seneca Nation's History
    Wednesday, June 2
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    It's been a rocky year for tribes. And then, for the Seneca Nation of Indians, came a victory. The tribal constitution was established in 1848. And more than 50 years before that, President George Washington gifted the Seneca Chief Red Jacket a peace medal. It's been gone from the Seneca people for more than 100 years, but now, it's home. Joining us today to talk about the return of the peace medal is the Seneca President Matthew Pagels. New Mexico voters just picked the candidate to replace Deb Haaland in the House of Representatives, and several Natives are waiting to be confirmed to federal posts. To break it all down we have Holly Cook Macarro with us. Macarro, Red Lake Ojibwe, is a partner with Spirit Rock Consulting and is a regular contributor to our news program.
  • The Catawba Face An Invisible Enemy
    Wednesday, June 2
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    As we continue to cover the coronavirus pandemic, we are checking in with tribal leaders to see how this global health crisis is impacting the people and the businesses. There is only one federally recognized tribe in South Carolina and that?s the Catawba Indian Nation. Bill Harris is the chief of the Catawba Indian Nation which has more than 3,000 citizens enrolled in the tribe. Like many things, sports are slowly coming back to Indian Country. And since there's so much happening in the world of Indian Country sports, we are creating a monthly segment to get updates on Native athletes. We have invited Brent Cahwee to give us this monthly update. Brent is the co-founder of NDN Sports, a digital website, which covers Native athletes at the high school, college, and professional levels.
  • The Catawba Face An Invisible Enemy
    Wednesday, June 2
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    As we continue to cover the coronavirus pandemic, we are checking in with tribal leaders to see how this global health crisis is impacting the people and the businesses. There is only one federally recognized tribe in South Carolina and that?s the Catawba Indian Nation. Bill Harris is the chief of the Catawba Indian Nation which has more than 3,000 citizens enrolled in the tribe. Like many things, sports are slowly coming back to Indian Country. And since there's so much happening in the world of Indian Country sports, we are creating a monthly segment to get updates on Native athletes. We have invited Brent Cahwee to give us this monthly update. Brent is the co-founder of NDN Sports, a digital website, which covers Native athletes at the high school, college, and professional levels.
  • The Catawba Face An Invisible Enemy
    Tuesday, June 1
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    As we continue to cover the coronavirus pandemic, we are checking in with tribal leaders to see how this global health crisis is impacting the people and the businesses. There is only one federally recognized tribe in South Carolina and that?s the Catawba Indian Nation. Bill Harris is the chief of the Catawba Indian Nation which has more than 3,000 citizens enrolled in the tribe. Like many things, sports are slowly coming back to Indian Country. And since there's so much happening in the world of Indian Country sports, we are creating a monthly segment to get updates on Native athletes. We have invited Brent Cahwee to give us this monthly update. Brent is the co-founder of NDN Sports, a digital website, which covers Native athletes at the high school, college, and professional levels.
  • Tuesday, June 1
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    No description available.
  • Tuesday, June 1
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    No description available.
  • Monday, May 31
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    No description available.
  • Acknowledging The Sacred
    Monday, May 31
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    On this weekend edition of Indian Country Today we're talking about credit cards, sacred spaces, and one family's Memorial Day quest.
  • Acknowledging The Sacred
    Monday, May 31
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    On this weekend edition of Indian Country Today we're talking about credit cards, sacred spaces, and one family's Memorial Day quest.
  • Acknowledging The Sacred
    Friday, May 28
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    On this weekend edition of Indian Country Today we're talking about credit cards, sacred spaces, and one family's Memorial Day quest.
  • Remembering Indian Country's Fallen Protectors
    Friday, May 28
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    We want to take a look back at the history of Native people who have served in the U.S. armed forces. Joining us today is Patty Loew, she's a professor at the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University in Illinois. She's also produced several documentaries like the award winning "Way of the Warrior." In 1954 American forces were deployed to the war in Vietnam. It was a brutal battle that killed more than 3 million people. More than 58, 000 Americans in the armed forces were either killed in action or went missing. Among those who were killed was the brother of Reggie Pagaling. He is an elder in the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians and talks with us about his brother Michael. The Luxembourg American Cemetery is the final resting place for more than 5,000 World War Two soldiers. They died serving their country on foreign soil. Sgt. John Mercer is one of them. Sgt. Mercer is the great uncle of Ivy Vainio. Ivy joins us today with her husband Arne Vainio. He wrote about visiting the grave in a column in 2013.
  • Remembering Indian Country's Fallen Protectors
    Friday, May 28
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    We want to take a look back at the history of Native people who have served in the U.S. armed forces. Joining us today is Patty Loew, she's a professor at the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University in Illinois. She's also produced several documentaries like the award winning "Way of the Warrior." In 1954 American forces were deployed to the war in Vietnam. It was a brutal battle that killed more than 3 million people. More than 58, 000 Americans in the armed forces were either killed in action or went missing. Among those who were killed was the brother of Reggie Pagaling. He is an elder in the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians and talks with us about his brother Michael. The Luxembourg American Cemetery is the final resting place for more than 5,000 World War Two soldiers. They died serving their country on foreign soil. Sgt. John Mercer is one of them. Sgt. Mercer is the great uncle of Ivy Vainio. Ivy joins us today with her husband Arne Vainio. He wrote about visiting the grave in a column in 2013.
  • Remembering Indian Country's Fallen Protectors
    Thursday, May 27
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    We want to take a look back at the history of Native people who have served in the U.S. armed forces. Joining us today is Patty Loew, she's a professor at the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University in Illinois. She's also produced several documentaries like the award winning "Way of the Warrior." In 1954 American forces were deployed to the war in Vietnam. It was a brutal battle that killed more than 3 million people. More than 58, 000 Americans in the armed forces were either killed in action or went missing. Among those who were killed was the brother of Reggie Pagaling. He is an elder in the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians and talks with us about his brother Michael. The Luxembourg American Cemetery is the final resting place for more than 5,000 World War Two soldiers. They died serving their country on foreign soil. Sgt. John Mercer is one of them. Sgt. Mercer is the great uncle of Ivy Vainio. Ivy joins us today with her husband Arne Vainio. He wrote about visiting the grave in a column in 2013.
  • Paying Down Debts During The Pandemic
    Thursday, May 27
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Good news about credit card debt: Americans are paying them off these days. Yet, that good news also comes with tempting offers for more credit. Patrice Kunesh is a lawyer and has banking experience. She established the Center for Indian Country Development at the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis. John Tahsuda III is a regular contributor to Indian Country Today. In 2002, he worked as the staff director for the Senate Indian Affairs Committee. He also is a former principal deputy assistant secretary for Indian Affairs and served in that position from 2017 to 2020. Today he is a partner with Navigators Global, a company that provides political services to several industries including tribes.
  • Paying Down Debts During The Pandemic
    Thursday, May 27
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    Good news about credit card debt: Americans are paying them off these days. Yet, that good news also comes with tempting offers for more credit. Patrice Kunesh is a lawyer and has banking experience. She established the Center for Indian Country Development at the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis. John Tahsuda III is a regular contributor to Indian Country Today. In 2002, he worked as the staff director for the Senate Indian Affairs Committee. He also is a former principal deputy assistant secretary for Indian Affairs and served in that position from 2017 to 2020. Today he is a partner with Navigators Global, a company that provides political services to several industries including tribes.
  • Paying Down Debts During The Pandemic
    Wednesday, May 26
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Good news about credit card debt: Americans are paying them off these days. Yet, that good news also comes with tempting offers for more credit. Patrice Kunesh is a lawyer and has banking experience. She established the Center for Indian Country Development at the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis. John Tahsuda III is a regular contributor to Indian Country Today. In 2002, he worked as the staff director for the Senate Indian Affairs Committee. He also is a former principal deputy assistant secretary for Indian Affairs and served in that position from 2017 to 2020. Today he is a partner with Navigators Global, a company that provides political services to several industries including tribes.
  • 'so Much' Music Potential, Pushing Boundaries
    Wednesday, May 26
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    The Grand Canyon has inspired creativity for generations. Musicians know this well through the Grand Canyon Music Festival. Since 1983, the festival has had a unique relationship with nearby tribes. The Native American Composers Apprenticeship Program brings Native youth together with professional classical musicians and composers. Michael Begay was an apprentice, and now he's a teacher. If you travel near the Santa Monica mountains, you most likely will see letters that stand 45-feet-tall proclaiming the area, "Indian Land." It's a not so subtle reference to the famous "Hollywood" sign that's closer to Los Angeles. Nicholas Galanin created the art installation he calls, "Never Forget. " It's one of 13 pieces of art from various artists for the Desert X 2021 exhibition. But as Sandra Hale Schulman reports, Galanin is taking his art one step further. Several Native groups have taken a stand against oil pipelines and now the state of Michigan is being joined with 12 tribes in taking a stand against one pipeline that's nearly 70 years old. Mary Annette Pember is a national correspondent for Indian Country Today and her story, "Enbridge pipeline showdown looms in Michigan" focuses on the plans to run the line 5 tunnel under the Straits of Mackinac.
  • 'so Much' Music Potential, Pushing Boundaries
    Wednesday, May 26
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    The Grand Canyon has inspired creativity for generations. Musicians know this well through the Grand Canyon Music Festival. Since 1983, the festival has had a unique relationship with nearby tribes. The Native American Composers Apprenticeship Program brings Native youth together with professional classical musicians and composers. Michael Begay was an apprentice, and now he's a teacher. If you travel near the Santa Monica mountains, you most likely will see letters that stand 45-feet-tall proclaiming the area, "Indian Land." It's a not so subtle reference to the famous "Hollywood" sign that's closer to Los Angeles. Nicholas Galanin created the art installation he calls, "Never Forget. " It's one of 13 pieces of art from various artists for the Desert X 2021 exhibition. But as Sandra Hale Schulman reports, Galanin is taking his art one step further. Several Native groups have taken a stand against oil pipelines and now the state of Michigan is being joined with 12 tribes in taking a stand against one pipeline that's nearly 70 years old. Mary Annette Pember is a national correspondent for Indian Country Today and her story, "Enbridge pipeline showdown looms in Michigan" focuses on the plans to run the line 5 tunnel under the Straits of Mackinac.
  • 'so Much' Music Potential, Pushing Boundaries
    Tuesday, May 25
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    The Grand Canyon has inspired creativity for generations. Musicians know this well through the Grand Canyon Music Festival. Since 1983, the festival has had a unique relationship with nearby tribes. The Native American Composers Apprenticeship Program brings Native youth together with professional classical musicians and composers. Michael Begay was an apprentice, and now he's a teacher. If you travel near the Santa Monica mountains, you most likely will see letters that stand 45-feet-tall proclaiming the area, "Indian Land." It's a not so subtle reference to the famous "Hollywood" sign that's closer to Los Angeles. Nicholas Galanin created the art installation he calls, "Never Forget. " It's one of 13 pieces of art from various artists for the Desert X 2021 exhibition. But as Sandra Hale Schulman reports, Galanin is taking his art one step further. Several Native groups have taken a stand against oil pipelines and now the state of Michigan is being joined with 12 tribes in taking a stand against one pipeline that's nearly 70 years old. Mary Annette Pember is a national correspondent for Indian Country Today and her story, "Enbridge pipeline showdown looms in Michigan" focuses on the plans to run the line 5 tunnel under the Straits of Mackinac.
  • Looking Through The Telescope
    Tuesday, May 25
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    To Native Hawaiians, Mauna Kea is sacred. It's a very special place. Scientists agree and want to see the Thirty Meter Telescope built there. Before the pandemic, up to 30 thousand people camped and protested against its construction. The Hawaiian State Legislature has established a working group to discuss how the site is managed. Three of its members are leading the protest movement. House Speaker Scott Saiki joins us to talk about this House Resolution. The First Amendment guarantees Freedom of Speech and of the Press. Does that right apply to student journalists? The Editor of Haskell University's The Indian Leader thinks it does. Last year, Haskell's University President Ronald Graham issued directives that limited the paper's access to public officials and telling the news. The editor pushed back, and last month, Graham was fired.
  • Looking Through The Telescope
    Tuesday, May 25
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    To Native Hawaiians, Mauna Kea is sacred. It's a very special place. Scientists agree and want to see the Thirty Meter Telescope built there. Before the pandemic, up to 30 thousand people camped and protested against its construction. The Hawaiian State Legislature has established a working group to discuss how the site is managed. Three of its members are leading the protest movement. House Speaker Scott Saiki joins us to talk about this House Resolution. The First Amendment guarantees Freedom of Speech and of the Press. Does that right apply to student journalists? The Editor of Haskell University's The Indian Leader thinks it does. Last year, Haskell's University President Ronald Graham issued directives that limited the paper's access to public officials and telling the news. The editor pushed back, and last month, Graham was fired.
  • Looking Through The Telescope
    Monday, May 24
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    To Native Hawaiians, Mauna Kea is sacred. It's a very special place. Scientists agree and want to see the Thirty Meter Telescope built there. Before the pandemic, up to 30 thousand people camped and protested against its construction. The Hawaiian State Legislature has established a working group to discuss how the site is managed. Three of its members are leading the protest movement. House Speaker Scott Saiki joins us to talk about this House Resolution. The First Amendment guarantees Freedom of Speech and of the Press. Does that right apply to student journalists? The Editor of Haskell University's The Indian Leader thinks it does. Last year, Haskell's University President Ronald Graham issued directives that limited the paper's access to public officials and telling the news. The editor pushed back, and last month, Graham was fired.
  • Education Obstacles and Opportunities
    Monday, May 24
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Patty Loew is a professor at the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University. A citizen of the Bad River Band of Lake Superior Ojibwe, she joins us today to talk about Indigenizing universities In 2019, the American Indian Policy Institute at Arizona State University found that 33-percent of people who live on tribal reservations rely solely on cell phones for internet service. Talking today about the need for broadband on tribal lands is Loris Taylor. She's the president of Native Public Media. And associate editor for Indian Country Today Vincent Schilling has more on the Kickapoo Captain America, Plus reporter Brian Bull puts down his press credentials and gets on the Oregon Trail. Volunteers from the Bad River Band of Lake Superior Chippewa in Wisconsin have been making star quilts for the tribe's high school graduates since 2011. The project began as a way to honor and recognize the often tough journey for Native students. ICT's Mary Annette Pember reports.
  • Education Obstacles and Opportunities
    Monday, May 24
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    Patty Loew is a professor at the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University. A citizen of the Bad River Band of Lake Superior Ojibwe, she joins us today to talk about Indigenizing universities In 2019, the American Indian Policy Institute at Arizona State University found that 33-percent of people who live on tribal reservations rely solely on cell phones for internet service. Talking today about the need for broadband on tribal lands is Loris Taylor. She's the president of Native Public Media. And associate editor for Indian Country Today Vincent Schilling has more on the Kickapoo Captain America, Plus reporter Brian Bull puts down his press credentials and gets on the Oregon Trail. Volunteers from the Bad River Band of Lake Superior Chippewa in Wisconsin have been making star quilts for the tribe's high school graduates since 2011. The project began as a way to honor and recognize the often tough journey for Native students. ICT's Mary Annette Pember reports.
  • Education Obstacles and Opportunities
    Friday, May 21
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Patty Loew is a professor at the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University. A citizen of the Bad River Band of Lake Superior Ojibwe, she joins us today to talk about Indigenizing universities In 2019, the American Indian Policy Institute at Arizona State University found that 33-percent of people who live on tribal reservations rely solely on cell phones for internet service. Talking today about the need for broadband on tribal lands is Loris Taylor. She's the president of Native Public Media. And associate editor for Indian Country Today Vincent Schilling has more on the Kickapoo Captain America, Plus reporter Brian Bull puts down his press credentials and gets on the Oregon Trail. Volunteers from the Bad River Band of Lake Superior Chippewa in Wisconsin have been making star quilts for the tribe's high school graduates since 2011. The project began as a way to honor and recognize the often tough journey for Native students. ICT's Mary Annette Pember reports.
  • Friday, May 21
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    No description available.
  • Friday, May 21
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    No description available.
  • Thursday, May 20
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    No description available.
  • Icwa: Reclaiming Indigenous Identity
    Thursday, May 20
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    The Indian Child Welfare Act became law in 1978 with a goal of keeping Native children with their families and tribes. As Blackfeet citizen and Salish descendant Brooke Pepion Swaney found out, the law was overlooked when Kendra was adopted by the Mylnechuk family. Brooke's first feature-length documentary, "Daughter of a Lost Bird," premieres at the prestigious Human Rights Watch Festival in New York, and everywhere online. Holly Cook Macarro, Red Lake Ojibwe, is back on the show! She's a partner at Spirit Rock Consulting. Holly's worked for tribal nations for more than 20 years and she's a regular guest commentator on our program. Today she'll be talking about the big Florida casino gaming compact and so much more.
  • Icwa: Reclaiming Indigenous Identity
    Thursday, May 20
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    The Indian Child Welfare Act became law in 1978 with a goal of keeping Native children with their families and tribes. As Blackfeet citizen and Salish descendant Brooke Pepion Swaney found out, the law was overlooked when Kendra was adopted by the Mylnechuk family. Brooke's first feature-length documentary, "Daughter of a Lost Bird," premieres at the prestigious Human Rights Watch Festival in New York, and everywhere online. Holly Cook Macarro, Red Lake Ojibwe, is back on the show! She's a partner at Spirit Rock Consulting. Holly's worked for tribal nations for more than 20 years and she's a regular guest commentator on our program. Today she'll be talking about the big Florida casino gaming compact and so much more.
  • Icwa: Reclaiming Indigenous Identity
    Wednesday, May 19
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    The Indian Child Welfare Act became law in 1978 with a goal of keeping Native children with their families and tribes. As Blackfeet citizen and Salish descendant Brooke Pepion Swaney found out, the law was overlooked when Kendra was adopted by the Mylnechuk family. Brooke's first feature-length documentary, "Daughter of a Lost Bird," premieres at the prestigious Human Rights Watch Festival in New York, and everywhere online. Holly Cook Macarro, Red Lake Ojibwe, is back on the show! She's a partner at Spirit Rock Consulting. Holly's worked for tribal nations for more than 20 years and she's a regular guest commentator on our program. Today she'll be talking about the big Florida casino gaming compact and so much more.
  • Tribes Need Better Broadband
    Wednesday, May 19
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Chances are if you live on an American Indian reservation you experience poor internet service. It's one disparity that was revealed to many Natives during this pandemic. Trying to connect to the web is spotty in many cases and non existent in others. In 2019, the American Indian Policy Institute at Arizona State University found that 18-percent of people who live on tribal reservations did not have access to the internet. They also found that 33-percent relied solely on cell phones for internet service. The cost of broadband is another barrier to access. Joining us today to talk about the need for broadband on tribal lands is Loris Taylor. She's the president of Native Public Media. Vincent Schilling is associate editor and senior correspondent at Indian Country Today. He enjoys technology, comics, and movies. He is also a film critic and writes the Native Nerd column. He recently had the opportunity to interview Darcie Little Badger about Marvel comics' brand new Kickapoo Captain America. Vincent joins us today with more details.
  • Tribes Need Better Broadband
    Wednesday, May 19
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    Chances are if you live on an American Indian reservation you experience poor internet service. It's one disparity that was revealed to many Natives during this pandemic. Trying to connect to the web is spotty in many cases and non existent in others. In 2019, the American Indian Policy Institute at Arizona State University found that 18-percent of people who live on tribal reservations did not have access to the internet. They also found that 33-percent relied solely on cell phones for internet service. The cost of broadband is another barrier to access. Joining us today to talk about the need for broadband on tribal lands is Loris Taylor. She's the president of Native Public Media. Vincent Schilling is associate editor and senior correspondent at Indian Country Today. He enjoys technology, comics, and movies. He is also a film critic and writes the Native Nerd column. He recently had the opportunity to interview Darcie Little Badger about Marvel comics' brand new Kickapoo Captain America. Vincent joins us today with more details.
  • Tribes Need Better Broadband
    Tuesday, May 18
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Chances are if you live on an American Indian reservation you experience poor internet service. It's one disparity that was revealed to many Natives during this pandemic. Trying to connect to the web is spotty in many cases and non existent in others. In 2019, the American Indian Policy Institute at Arizona State University found that 18-percent of people who live on tribal reservations did not have access to the internet. They also found that 33-percent relied solely on cell phones for internet service. The cost of broadband is another barrier to access. Joining us today to talk about the need for broadband on tribal lands is Loris Taylor. She's the president of Native Public Media. Vincent Schilling is associate editor and senior correspondent at Indian Country Today. He enjoys technology, comics, and movies. He is also a film critic and writes the Native Nerd column. He recently had the opportunity to interview Darcie Little Badger about Marvel comics' brand new Kickapoo Captain America. Vincent joins us today with more details.
  • Indigenizing Universities
    Tuesday, May 18
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Patty Loew is a professor at the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University. She's a citizen of the Bad River Band of Lake Superior Ojibwe, Lowe is also a documentary producer and former broadcast journalist. Patty is the award-winning author of three books including Native People of Wisconsin, which is used by 15,000 Wisconsin school children. She joins us today to talk about Indigenizing universities. Orchestras are broadening the definition of classical music--to embrace works by Native American composers. An article in Symphony Magazine by Cheyenne River writer Rita Pyrillis explains how Indigenous musicians express their traditions in a western framework.
  • Indigenizing Universities
    Tuesday, May 18
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    Patty Loew is a professor at the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University. She's a citizen of the Bad River Band of Lake Superior Ojibwe, Lowe is also a documentary producer and former broadcast journalist. Patty is the award-winning author of three books including Native People of Wisconsin, which is used by 15,000 Wisconsin school children. She joins us today to talk about Indigenizing universities. Orchestras are broadening the definition of classical music--to embrace works by Native American composers. An article in Symphony Magazine by Cheyenne River writer Rita Pyrillis explains how Indigenous musicians express their traditions in a western framework.
  • Indigenizing Universities
    Monday, May 17
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Patty Loew is a professor at the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University. She's a citizen of the Bad River Band of Lake Superior Ojibwe, Lowe is also a documentary producer and former broadcast journalist. Patty is the award-winning author of three books including Native People of Wisconsin, which is used by 15,000 Wisconsin school children. She joins us today to talk about Indigenizing universities. Orchestras are broadening the definition of classical music--to embrace works by Native American composers. An article in Symphony Magazine by Cheyenne River writer Rita Pyrillis explains how Indigenous musicians express their traditions in a western framework.
  • The Healing Efforts of Indian Country
    Monday, May 17
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    On this weekend edition of Indian Country Today, we hear from Native leaders who sum up COViD response, as well as repatriation efforts in California. Plus how creativity heals in a pandemic.
  • The Healing Efforts of Indian Country
    Monday, May 17
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    On this weekend edition of Indian Country Today, we hear from Native leaders who sum up COViD response, as well as repatriation efforts in California. Plus how creativity heals in a pandemic.
  • The Healing Efforts of Indian Country
    Friday, May 14
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    On this weekend edition of Indian Country Today, we hear from Native leaders who sum up COViD response, as well as repatriation efforts in California. Plus how creativity heals in a pandemic.
  • Surviving A Third Pandemic
    Friday, May 14
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    For the past year we have asked many tribal leaders about how the coronavirus has impacted their people and their economies. We've heard many stories, some familiar and others unique to the tribe. Joining us today is Mark Macarro. He's the chairman of the Pechanga Band of Luiseno Indians in southern California. The coronavirus created several issues for tribes such as putting people on lockdown and closing tribal businesses and services. Perhaps one unexpected outcome of the pandemic is the increase in tribal enrollment. Kalle Benallie joins the show to talk about how COVID-19 helped increase the population of the Navajo Nation.
  • Surviving A Third Pandemic
    Friday, May 14
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    For the past year we have asked many tribal leaders about how the coronavirus has impacted their people and their economies. We've heard many stories, some familiar and others unique to the tribe. Joining us today is Mark Macarro. He's the chairman of the Pechanga Band of Luiseno Indians in southern California. The coronavirus created several issues for tribes such as putting people on lockdown and closing tribal businesses and services. Perhaps one unexpected outcome of the pandemic is the increase in tribal enrollment. Kalle Benallie joins the show to talk about how COVID-19 helped increase the population of the Navajo Nation.
  • Surviving A Third Pandemic
    Thursday, May 13
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    For the past year we have asked many tribal leaders about how the coronavirus has impacted their people and their economies. We've heard many stories, some familiar and others unique to the tribe. Joining us today is Mark Macarro. He's the chairman of the Pechanga Band of Luiseno Indians in southern California. The coronavirus created several issues for tribes such as putting people on lockdown and closing tribal businesses and services. Perhaps one unexpected outcome of the pandemic is the increase in tribal enrollment. Kalle Benallie joins the show to talk about how COVID-19 helped increase the population of the Navajo Nation.
  • Bringing Ancestors Home
    Thursday, May 13
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    The process of repatriation, moving ancestors from museums to burial grounds, has been painstakingly slow. Assemblyman James Ramos has said Indigenous people have had to jump through unnecessary hoops for a burial process that should not even be an issue. The Assemblyman, who is Serrano and Cahuilla, is the first California Indian to be elected to the California state legislature. John Tahsuda III is a regular contributor to Indian Country Today. In 2002 he worked as the staff director for the Senate Indian Affairs Committee. He also is a former principal deputy assistant secretary for Indian Affairs and served in that position from 2017 to 2020. Prior to that he worked with Navigators Global which is a company that provides political services to several industries including tribes.
  • Bringing Ancestors Home
    Thursday, May 13
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    The process of repatriation, moving ancestors from museums to burial grounds, has been painstakingly slow. Assemblyman James Ramos has said Indigenous people have had to jump through unnecessary hoops for a burial process that should not even be an issue. The Assemblyman, who is Serrano and Cahuilla, is the first California Indian to be elected to the California state legislature. John Tahsuda III is a regular contributor to Indian Country Today. In 2002 he worked as the staff director for the Senate Indian Affairs Committee. He also is a former principal deputy assistant secretary for Indian Affairs and served in that position from 2017 to 2020. Prior to that he worked with Navigators Global which is a company that provides political services to several industries including tribes.
  • Bringing Ancestors Home
    Wednesday, May 12
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    The process of repatriation, moving ancestors from museums to burial grounds, has been painstakingly slow. Assemblyman James Ramos has said Indigenous people have had to jump through unnecessary hoops for a burial process that should not even be an issue. The Assemblyman, who is Serrano and Cahuilla, is the first California Indian to be elected to the California state legislature. John Tahsuda III is a regular contributor to Indian Country Today. In 2002 he worked as the staff director for the Senate Indian Affairs Committee. He also is a former principal deputy assistant secretary for Indian Affairs and served in that position from 2017 to 2020. Prior to that he worked with Navigators Global which is a company that provides political services to several industries including tribes.
  • Orchestrating Solo
    Wednesday, May 12
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Pandemic restrictions and the social justice movement are colliding on stage in St. Paul, Minnesota. The result is, small scale compositions that are premiering this month all composed by people of color. These solo pieces are made for wind instruments and the concerts are being streamed online by the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra. Brent Michael Davids is one of the composers and he joins us today. Up until recently, the Muscogee Nation, in Oklahoma had the word "Creek" in its name. Reporter Kolby KickingWoman joins us on the show today to discuss what the name change means and doesn't mean.
  • Orchestrating Solo
    Wednesday, May 12
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    Pandemic restrictions and the social justice movement are colliding on stage in St. Paul, Minnesota. The result is, small scale compositions that are premiering this month all composed by people of color. These solo pieces are made for wind instruments and the concerts are being streamed online by the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra. Brent Michael Davids is one of the composers and he joins us today. Up until recently, the Muscogee Nation, in Oklahoma had the word "Creek" in its name. Reporter Kolby KickingWoman joins us on the show today to discuss what the name change means and doesn't mean.
  • Orchestrating Solo
    Tuesday, May 11
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Pandemic restrictions and the social justice movement are colliding on stage in St. Paul, Minnesota. The result is, small scale compositions that are premiering this month all composed by people of color. These solo pieces are made for wind instruments and the concerts are being streamed online by the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra. Brent Michael Davids is one of the composers and he joins us today. Up until recently, the Muscogee Nation, in Oklahoma had the word "Creek" in its name. Reporter Kolby KickingWoman joins us on the show today to discuss what the name change means and doesn't mean.
  • Vaccines: We Know Our Population and Our Patients
    Tuesday, May 11
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Indian Country has been a leader in vaccination plans. The Indian Health Service is central to that progress. Elizabeth Fowler, Comanche, is acting director of the Indian Health Service, an agency within the U.S Department of Health and Human services. Diversity in education is a topic that has focused on students, curriculum and leadership. Joaqlin Estus is our national correspondent based in Anchorage and she joins us now to talk about how that's being played out at the University of Alaska, the University of Alaska Anchorage and even at Ilisagvik tribal college in Utquiagvik, Alaska.
  • Vaccines: We Know Our Population and Our Patients
    Tuesday, May 11
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    Indian Country has been a leader in vaccination plans. The Indian Health Service is central to that progress. Elizabeth Fowler, Comanche, is acting director of the Indian Health Service, an agency within the U.S Department of Health and Human services. Diversity in education is a topic that has focused on students, curriculum and leadership. Joaqlin Estus is our national correspondent based in Anchorage and she joins us now to talk about how that's being played out at the University of Alaska, the University of Alaska Anchorage and even at Ilisagvik tribal college in Utquiagvik, Alaska.
  • Vaccines: We Know Our Population and Our Patients
    Monday, May 10
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Indian Country has been a leader in vaccination plans. The Indian Health Service is central to that progress. Elizabeth Fowler, Comanche, is acting director of the Indian Health Service, an agency within the U.S Department of Health and Human services. Diversity in education is a topic that has focused on students, curriculum and leadership. Joaqlin Estus is our national correspondent based in Anchorage and she joins us now to talk about how that's being played out at the University of Alaska, the University of Alaska Anchorage and even at Ilisagvik tribal college in Utquiagvik, Alaska.
  • Celebrating Native American Women
    Monday, May 10
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Rodney Cawston is the Chairman of the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation. He joins the show to talk about an important anniversary for all Native Americans. On the National Day of Awareness for Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women. Mary Kathryn Nagle, who is Cherokee, is on the show to talk about the continuing crisis. Shari Pena, who is Cherokee, is a wife and the mother of four who has always wanted to have a large family. Shari said she and her husband Hyrum wanted to be foster parents long before they had biological children.
  • Celebrating Native American Women
    Monday, May 10
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    Rodney Cawston is the Chairman of the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation. He joins the show to talk about an important anniversary for all Native Americans. On the National Day of Awareness for Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women. Mary Kathryn Nagle, who is Cherokee, is on the show to talk about the continuing crisis. Shari Pena, who is Cherokee, is a wife and the mother of four who has always wanted to have a large family. Shari said she and her husband Hyrum wanted to be foster parents long before they had biological children.
  • Celebrating Native American Women
    Friday, May 7
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Rodney Cawston is the Chairman of the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation. He joins the show to talk about an important anniversary for all Native Americans. On the National Day of Awareness for Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women. Mary Kathryn Nagle, who is Cherokee, is on the show to talk about the continuing crisis. Shari Pena, who is Cherokee, is a wife and the mother of four who has always wanted to have a large family. Shari said she and her husband Hyrum wanted to be foster parents long before they had biological children.
  • Fostering Little Sacred Ones
    Friday, May 7
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Shari Pena, who is Cherokee, is a wife and the mother of four who has always wanted to have a large family. Shari said she and her husband Hyrum wanted to be foster parents long before they had biological children. The Pena's have been fostering since 2017. There are hundreds of staffers who work in the White House. And as President Joe Biden's administration continues to take shape several Native Americans are being tapped for positions in the White House. Reporter and producer Aliyah Chavez, joins us today to tell us more.
  • Fostering Little Sacred Ones
    Friday, May 7
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    Shari Pena, who is Cherokee, is a wife and the mother of four who has always wanted to have a large family. Shari said she and her husband Hyrum wanted to be foster parents long before they had biological children. The Pena's have been fostering since 2017. There are hundreds of staffers who work in the White House. And as President Joe Biden's administration continues to take shape several Native Americans are being tapped for positions in the White House. Reporter and producer Aliyah Chavez, joins us today to tell us more.
  • Fostering Little Sacred Ones
    Thursday, May 6
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Shari Pena, who is Cherokee, is a wife and the mother of four who has always wanted to have a large family. Shari said she and her husband Hyrum wanted to be foster parents long before they had biological children. The Pena's have been fostering since 2017. There are hundreds of staffers who work in the White House. And as President Joe Biden's administration continues to take shape several Native Americans are being tapped for positions in the White House. Reporter and producer Aliyah Chavez, joins us today to tell us more.
  • Missing But Not Forgotten
    Thursday, May 6
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Native women face murder rates more than 10 times the national average. More than 5,000 American Indian and Alaska Native women are missing. And 55 percent of Native women have experienced domestic violence, according to the U.S. Department of Justice. Joining us today is Cherokee citizen Mary Kathryn Nagle. She's a partner at Pipestem and Nagle. She represents the National Indigenous Women's Resource Center and works on issues facing women. Mary Kathryn has written and produced several plays relating to Indians and the law. And also joining us today is Red Lake Band of Ojibwe citizen Holly Cook Macarro. A partner at Spirit Rock Consulting, she's worked for tribal nations for more than 20 years. Holly is a regular contributor to Indian Country Today and today she breaks down what's going on in the nation's capital.
  • Missing But Not Forgotten
    Thursday, May 6
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    Native women face murder rates more than 10 times the national average. More than 5,000 American Indian and Alaska Native women are missing. And 55 percent of Native women have experienced domestic violence, according to the U.S. Department of Justice. Joining us today is Cherokee citizen Mary Kathryn Nagle. She's a partner at Pipestem and Nagle. She represents the National Indigenous Women's Resource Center and works on issues facing women. Mary Kathryn has written and produced several plays relating to Indians and the law. And also joining us today is Red Lake Band of Ojibwe citizen Holly Cook Macarro. A partner at Spirit Rock Consulting, she's worked for tribal nations for more than 20 years. Holly is a regular contributor to Indian Country Today and today she breaks down what's going on in the nation's capital.
  • Missing But Not Forgotten
    Wednesday, May 5
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Native women face murder rates more than 10 times the national average. More than 5,000 American Indian and Alaska Native women are missing. And 55 percent of Native women have experienced domestic violence, according to the U.S. Department of Justice. Joining us today is Cherokee citizen Mary Kathryn Nagle. She's a partner at Pipestem and Nagle. She represents the National Indigenous Women's Resource Center and works on issues facing women. Mary Kathryn has written and produced several plays relating to Indians and the law. And also joining us today is Red Lake Band of Ojibwe citizen Holly Cook Macarro. A partner at Spirit Rock Consulting, she's worked for tribal nations for more than 20 years. Holly is a regular contributor to Indian Country Today and today she breaks down what's going on in the nation's capital.
  • Staying Prepared for Wildfire Season
    Wednesday, May 5
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Rodney Cawston is the Chairman of the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation. His tribe is located in Nespelem, Washington which has experienced wildfires in the past. He joins us today to talk about fire prevention and the importance of knowing the signs. For more than a year now tribes have been dealing with the impact of the coronavirus pandemic. After scrambling in the beginning, some tribes are starting to get the pandemic under control. Joining us today is Mike LeGarde, who is Grand Portage Band of Chippewa. He's the senior producer of the program, "Almanac North."
  • Staying Prepared for Wildfire Season
    Wednesday, May 5
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    Rodney Cawston is the Chairman of the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation. His tribe is located in Nespelem, Washington which has experienced wildfires in the past. He joins us today to talk about fire prevention and the importance of knowing the signs. For more than a year now tribes have been dealing with the impact of the coronavirus pandemic. After scrambling in the beginning, some tribes are starting to get the pandemic under control. Joining us today is Mike LeGarde, who is Grand Portage Band of Chippewa. He's the senior producer of the program, "Almanac North."
  • Staying Prepared for Wildfire Season
    Tuesday, May 4
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Rodney Cawston is the Chairman of the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation. His tribe is located in Nespelem, Washington which has experienced wildfires in the past. He joins us today to talk about fire prevention and the importance of knowing the signs. For more than a year now tribes have been dealing with the impact of the coronavirus pandemic. After scrambling in the beginning, some tribes are starting to get the pandemic under control. Joining us today is Mike LeGarde, who is Grand Portage Band of Chippewa. He's the senior producer of the program, "Almanac North."
  • Those Are Our People
    Tuesday, May 4
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    More than a dozen years ago the Phoebe A. Hearst museum fired its anthropology team that was supposed to be monitoring human remains and said it had a final inventory of some 2000 human remains and funerary objects. All of those remains and objects are associated with the Chumash people. Even now the tribe has said the University of California Berkeley is a "documented bad actor" that continues to deliberately obstruct repatriation. Today we speak with Chairman Kenneth Kahn of the Santa Ynez Band of Mission Indians. There are two cases involving Indian Country that are being heard in the Supreme Court. Our reporter Kolby KickingWoman joins the newscast to tell us more about those cases as well as some reactions from the movers and shakers in and around Washington D.C. And Kolby tell us more about the commission the Biden administration has formed.
  • Those Are Our People
    Tuesday, May 4
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    More than a dozen years ago the Phoebe A. Hearst museum fired its anthropology team that was supposed to be monitoring human remains and said it had a final inventory of some 2000 human remains and funerary objects. All of those remains and objects are associated with the Chumash people. Even now the tribe has said the University of California Berkeley is a "documented bad actor" that continues to deliberately obstruct repatriation. Today we speak with Chairman Kenneth Kahn of the Santa Ynez Band of Mission Indians. There are two cases involving Indian Country that are being heard in the Supreme Court. Our reporter Kolby KickingWoman joins the newscast to tell us more about those cases as well as some reactions from the movers and shakers in and around Washington D.C. And Kolby tell us more about the commission the Biden administration has formed.
  • Those Are Our People
    Monday, May 3
    8:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    More than a dozen years ago the Phoebe A. Hearst museum fired its anthropology team that was supposed to be monitoring human remains and said it had a final inventory of some 2000 human remains and funerary objects. All of those remains and objects are associated with the Chumash people. Even now the tribe has said the University of California Berkeley is a "documented bad actor" that continues to deliberately obstruct repatriation. Today we speak with Chairman Kenneth Kahn of the Santa Ynez Band of Mission Indians. There are two cases involving Indian Country that are being heard in the Supreme Court. Our reporter Kolby KickingWoman joins the newscast to tell us more about those cases as well as some reactions from the movers and shakers in and around Washington D.C. And Kolby tell us more about the commission the Biden administration has formed.
  • A Plan for Tomorrow's Leaders
    Monday, May 3
    1:00 pm on FNX 9.3
    Peggy Flanagan, who is White Earth Ojibwe, shares some of her personal highlights while serving as Minnesota's 50th Lieutenant Governor. Ruth Buffalo of the Mandan, Hidatsa, and Arikara Nation, speaks with us about the effort to get public schools in North Dakota to teach American Indian history and the many people who helped to make it a reality. Mary Kim Titla, who is San Carlos Apache talks about her magical experience with UNITY, INC and continuing its 45 year commitment to Indigenous youth. Henry Red Cloud, from the Oglala Lakota Nation in South Dakota knows a thing or two about trees. This May, his crew will plant 35 thousand trees. For Ojibwe the sugarbush is a means to not only collect healthy traditional food but also a way to reconnect with the healing properties of subsistence activities. National correspondent Mary Annette Pember reports.
  • A Plan for Tomorrow's Leaders
    Monday, May 3
    7:00 am on FNX 9.3
    Peggy Flanagan, who is White Earth Ojibwe, shares some of her personal highlights while serving as Minnesota's 50th Lieutenant Governor. Ruth Buffalo of the Mandan, Hidatsa, and Arikara Nation, speaks with us about the effort to get public schools in North Dakota to teach American Indian history and the many people who helped to make it a reality. Mary Kim Titla, who is San Carlos Apache talks about her magical experience with UNITY, INC and continuing its 45 year commitment to Indigenous youth. Henry Red Cloud, from the Oglala Lakota Nation in South Dakota knows a thing or two about trees. This May, his crew will plant 35 thousand trees. For Ojibwe the sugarbush is a means to not only collect healthy traditional food but also a way to reconnect with the healing properties of subsistence activities. National correspondent Mary Annette Pember reports.