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How to Recognize Fake News

Think of fake news as a disease. Without knowing how to identify and stop its spread, information literacy is at risk, especially among audiences whose critical thinking skills are vulnerable. This video series equips viewers with tools to spot the stories and images that are false, biased, altered or slanted, even those shared by trusted friends or family. Easy tips to detect and check fake news will encourage scrutinizing material for opinion, inaccuracy or misrepresentation. Target audiences learn how to avoid being duped by fake news and may be less quick to click until they know what’s real and what’s not.

How to Recognize Fake News  
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  • Fake News Part 2
    Thursday, October 10
    2:22 pm on UEN-TV 9.1
    Fake news is prevalent because it seems so real. But passing it along via social media is more than sharing. It lends credibility to untrustworthy sources. By explaining click baits, bias and information bubbles, this video helps viewers discern what’s real and what’s not. Startling examples of altered photos reveal the skills employed by fake newsmongers. Cross-referencing to determine objective news sources and sites is explained along with reverse image search and expert confirmation. This video will assist viewers in getting past the hype of fake news to discover the real story.
  • Fake News Part 1
    Thursday, October 10
    2:00 pm on UEN-TV 9.1
    Fake news is more than a social media menace—it’s threatening critical thinking skills needed to develop information literacy. Combined with the impulse to share exciting, shocking and alarming stories, fake news is shaping—and distorting—perceptions, especially in younger demographics. In this video, viewers learn what drives fake news, how to spot it and how to de-bunk it. They’ll see how to distinguish between bias and accuracy, and opinion from fact. Vignettes that mimic online feeds and searches show how to detect completely false stories, slanted information, pure propaganda and misused data.
  • Fake News Part 2
    Wednesday, October 9
    10:22 am on UEN-TV 9.1
    Fake news is prevalent because it seems so real. But passing it along via social media is more than sharing. It lends credibility to untrustworthy sources. By explaining click baits, bias and information bubbles, this video helps viewers discern what’s real and what’s not. Startling examples of altered photos reveal the skills employed by fake newsmongers. Cross-referencing to determine objective news sources and sites is explained along with reverse image search and expert confirmation. This video will assist viewers in getting past the hype of fake news to discover the real story.
  • Fake News Part 1
    Wednesday, October 9
    10:00 am on UEN-TV 9.1
    Fake news is more than a social media menace—it’s threatening critical thinking skills needed to develop information literacy. Combined with the impulse to share exciting, shocking and alarming stories, fake news is shaping—and distorting—perceptions, especially in younger demographics. In this video, viewers learn what drives fake news, how to spot it and how to de-bunk it. They’ll see how to distinguish between bias and accuracy, and opinion from fact. Vignettes that mimic online feeds and searches show how to detect completely false stories, slanted information, pure propaganda and misused data.