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Go Fly a Kite

Summary

In this lesson students will learn to distinguish between goals and dreams and identify the benefits of having dreams, setting goals, and working toward them. They will learn how to use guidelines for making dreams come true and for planning how to reach a specific goal.


Materials


Intended Learning Outcomes

  • Distinguish between goals and dreams.
  • Identify the benefits of having dreams, setting goals, and working toward them.
  • Use guidelines for making dreams come true and for planning how to reach a specific goal.


Instructional Procedures

Lesson at a Glance

  1. Discuss the definitions and importance of goals and dreams.
  2. Tell the kite story and discuss the importance of goals.
  3. Discuss specific ideas for achieving goals (Koosh Ball® activity).
  4. Complete the kite project.

New Vocabulary

  • short-term goals
  • long-term goals
  • dreams

Introduction (Setting Focus)

  1. Discuss the definition and importance of dreams and goals. Using the "You Have to Have a Dream to Make a Dream Come True" poster, encourage students to think about:
    • What they want to have;
    • What they want to do;
    • What they want to be;
    • Where they want to go;
    • What they want to see.
  2. Students complete the "I Have A Dream" worksheet and share some of their ideas with the class.
  3. Discuss the difference between a dream and a goal using the "Dreams are things you want to have happen and goals are dreams that you make happen" poster.

Body (Strategies/Activities)

  1. Relate the following story.

    One March day, a little boy and his father were out flying a kite. It took them a while, but finally they managed to get their kite into the air. The little boy held on to the string as the kite went higher and higher. Curiously, the little boy inquired, "Dad, what is holding the kite in the air?" "It's the string you're holding on to," replied the father. The boy gave a couple of jerks on the string and, smiling, said, "No, no, Dad, the string is holding the kite down. I want to know what is holding it up there." Again the father replied, "The string holds it up. If you don't believe me, let go of the string." The boy let go of the string and sure enough the kite started to come down. It seems odd, but the very thing that appeared to hold the kite down was actually allowing the kite to go higher and higher.

  2. Discuss that a kite doesn't fly very high without a string and it's not very fun or rewarding just flying the string. Dreams make our lives fun and exciting, whereas, structure, plans, and deadlines help us reach our goals and make our dreams become a reality.
  3. Discuss the benefits of having dreams, setting goals, and working toward them.
  4. Discuss some of the basic guidelines for reaching goals using the following outline, the Koosh Ball® exercise. Complete the "Getting Your Goals Off the Ground" worksheet after discussing all the guidelines.
    1. Decide on a measurable goal. The goal should be believable, achievable, within control, precise enough to measure, desirable and positive.
    2. Be specific. Set a specific goal that is measurable so you know when you've reached it. The more specific, the better.
    3. Make the goal challenging yet realistic. The goal should be achievable but not too easy.
    4. Break long-term goals into short-term goals. Discuss the difference between long- and short-term goals . Achieving each short-term goal can provide motivation and keep you moving forward.
    5. Seek the support of others. Find people who will help and support you in reaching your goal.
    6. Don't let obstacles get you down. Don't give up. Find ways to overcome any obstacles you may face.
    7. Stay focused. Keep working toward your goal.
    8. Periodically evaluate your progress. Make changes as needed.

    Activity suggestion: Koosh Ball®.

    1. Invite a volunteer to hold the Koosh Ball® for a few seconds and then return it. Next, the student chooses a specific, nonhuman target and attempts to hit the target with the ball. Encourage the student to be as specific as possible in selecting a target. Discuss the differences between the two activities using some of the following ideas:

      "What were you thinking when you held the ball and gave it back?"

      "What different feelings happened when there was a target to try for as opposed to just holding the ball?"

      "What is the difference between having a goal and not having a goal?"

      "What are the benefits of having a measurable and specific goal?"

    2. Use another volunteer and instruct him or her to toss the Koosh into a large garbage can. Place the garbage can right next to the student. Place the garbage can so far away that the student can't possibly toss the Koosh in to it. Have the student select a place for the garbage can that offers a challenge but close enough allow the student to make the goal.

      Discuss the differences between the two activities using some of the following ideas:

      "How rewarding is the activity if the goal is too close?"

      "What are the different feelings between a goal that is too easy, too far or achievable?"

      "What is the difference between having a goal and not having a goal?"

      "How can a goal be both challenging and realistic?"

      "What kind of goals can students set that challenge, yet are achievable?"

       

    3. Use another volunteer to figure out how to get the Koosh into a garbage can that is placed so far away that it is impossible to make the goal in one throw. The task can be complicated by requiring the ball never to touch the ground. Then allow the student to throw the Koosh and pick it up again to reach the goal.

      Discuss the differences between the two activities using some of the following ideas:

      "How was the goal achieved?"

      "What other ways could this long goal have been achieved?"

      "What makes long-term goals achievable?"

      "What makes long-term goals difficult?"

       

    4. Use a different volunteer to throw the Koosh into the garbage can which another student is holding. As the first student tosses the Koosh, the second moves the can so the Koosh misses the target. Discuss the concept of connecting with people who can help realize goals and not stand in the way of achievement. Instruct the second student to cooperate with the goal of hitting the target.

      Discuss the activities using some of the following ideas:

      "What happened to make the first efforts unsuccessful?"

      "What traits make a good team to achieve goals?"

      "How did this team change to achieve their goals?"

      "What other ideas would make this team more effective or efficient?"

       

    5. Use a different volunteer to tell you where to stand in the room that is challenging yet realistic. As the volunteer is attempting to hit the target, allow a few students to try to block it. If the volunteer is unsuccessful, brainstorm ways to overcome the obstacle. The volunteer and the class work together to overcome the few obstacles and achieve the goal.

      Discuss the activities using some of the following ideas:

      "What happened to make the first efforts unsuccessful?"

      "What kinds of obstacles get between us and our goals?"

      "What kinds of resources are available to people to realize goals and dreams?"

      "Name several ideas that can help individuals overcome obstacles."

       

    6. Another volunteer instructs you where to stand with the box (challenging but realistic). The volunteer attempts to throw the Koosh in the box a few times, while turned in the opposite direction so he or she can not see the box. The volunteer then faces the target and tosses until successful.

      Discuss the activities using some of the following ideas:

      "What happened to make the first efforts unsuccessful?"

      "When have you lost focus on a goal, turned away and forgotten about it?"

      "What skills and behaviors do people need to stay focused on their goals?"

      "What behaviors do you need to change to realize a lost goal or dream?"

       

    7. The next volunteer tells you where to stand with the garbage can target (challenging but realistic). Place the garbage can on the floor with the open side down. The volunteer tosses the ball at the target with the intent of making the goal. Evaluate the activity's success. Brainstorm changes that must be made and try again.

      Discuss the activities using some of the following ideas:

      "What kinds of frustrations do people feel when trying to achieve goals?"

      "What kinds of things need to periodically evaluated to ensure progress?"

      "What changes would you need to make to achieve a current goal that is not being met?"

       

    8. Complete the "Getting Goals off the Ground" worksheet.

Closure (Wrap-Up and Extension)

  1. Complete this lesson using the "Getting Goals Off the Ground" worksheet.
  2. Students share their plans for reaching their goals and show their completed kites to the class.
  3. Encourage the class to keep their kites as a reminder of their goals and to help them stay focused.


Created: 12/15/2009
Updated: 01/24/2020
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